Course Descriptions

Depending on your college, major, and academic interest, there are a variety of ways for you to fulfill your Advanced Writing in the Disciplines (AWD) requirement. Students in different colleges have different options, but you should always make your decision in consultation with your academic advisor. The following brief descriptions are meant to help you start the conversation with your advisor.

Students are highly encouraged to enroll in the AWD course most appropriate for their major, not only because of distinctions among the course descriptions but also because they will work with others in their disciplines.

Speakers of Other Languages (SOL) Sections
The Writing Program also offer a few sections of AWD for Speakers of Other Languages (SOL) each semester.Students who identify as non-native speakers of English and wish to register for one of these courses will need to fill out the Speakers of Other Languages Course Survey.

Typically, an SOL section:

  • Offers more one-to-one attention because of smaller class size (15 students in SOL vs 19 students in a regular AWD section)
  • Offers a community in which multilingual students often feel more comfortable participating in class
  • Offers pacing designed to meet the needs of multilingual writers
  • Often includes cultural introductions to pop-culture, humor, and contemporary events
  • Often provides closer attention to specific language use and vocabulary

We currently offer SOL sections for ENGW 3304 (Advanced Writing in the Business Administration Professions) and ENGW 3315 (Interdisciplinary Advanced Writing).

ENGW 3302 Advanced Writing in the Technical Professions
Provides writing instruction for students in the College of Engineering and the College of Computer and Information Science. Students practice and reflect on writing in professional, public, and academic genres, such as technical reports, progress reports, proposals, instructions, presentations, and technical reviews, relevant to technical professions and individual student goals. In a workshop setting, students evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.
ENGW 3304 Advanced Writing in the Business Administration Professions
Provides writing instruction for students in the College of Business Administration. Students practice and reflect on writing in professional, public, and academic genres, such as proposals, recommendation reports, letters, presentations, and emails, relevant for careers in business. In a workshop setting, students evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.
ENGW 3305 Advanced Writing in the Criminal Justice Professions
Provides writing instruction for students in criminal justice. Students practice and reflect on writing in professional, public, and academic genres, such as reports, protocols, press releases, and public service announcements, relevant for careers in criminal justice and related fields. In a workshop setting, students evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.
ENGW 3306 Advanced Writing in the Health Profession
Provides writing instruction for students in the Bouvé College of Health Sciences. Students practice and reflect on writing in professional, public, and academic genres, such as literature reviews, case studies, protocols, and care instructions, relevant for careers in nursing, pharmacy, and other health professions. In a workshop setting, students evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.
ENGW 3307 Advanced Writing in the Sciences
Provides instruction in writing for students considering careers or advanced study in the physical or life sciences. By exploring research literature and reflecting on their own experiences, class members identify issues of interest in their field and analyze how scientific texts make claims, invoke other scientific literature, offer evidence, and deploy key terms. Through analysis and imitation, students are exposed to the challenges of the scientific project, such as the use of quantitative data and visual presentation of evidence. In a workshop setting, students evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.
ENGW 3308 Advanced Writing in the Social Sciences
Provides instruction in writing for students considering careers or advanced study in the social sciences. By exploring research literature and reflecting on their own experiences, class members identify issues of interest and analyze how texts make claims, invoke other social science literature, offer evidence, and deploy key terms. Through analysis and imitation, students are exposed to the challenges of the social science project, including the collection of data on human subjects and the ethical presentation of evidence. In a workshop setting, students evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.
ENGW 3309 Advanced Writing in the Humanities
Provides instruction in writing for students considering careers or advanced study in the humanities. By exploring critical literature and reflecting on their own experiences, class members identify issues of interest and analyze how texts make claims, invoke primary and secondary texts, offer evidence, and deploy key terms. Through analysis and imitation, students are exposed to the challenges of the humanities project, including the framing of interpretive questions and the presentation of textual evidence. In a workshop setting, students evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.
ENGW 3310 Advanced Writing in Literature
Builds upon courses in the English major by focusing on “writing about literature” as a genre, a kind of writing that has its own history and set of styles and conventions. Students analyze a variety of strategies that readers, including published scholars, use in writing about literature. Students also examine how such strategies are shaped by different literary theories and approaches to texts, as well as by assumptions about what constitutes an argument and what is an appropriate persona or voice to adopt in literary studies. In a workshop setting, students evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.
ENGW 3311 Advanced Writing for Prelaw
Provides instruction in writing for students considering legal careers. Introduces students to legal reasoning and to the contexts, purposes, genres, audiences, and styles of legal writing. Emphasizes the role of writing and argument in American legal culture. Using strategies drawn from rhetorical theory and criticism, students examine briefs, memoranda, opinions, and other legal texts to identify and describe techniques of analysis and persuasion. In a workshop setting, students evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.
ENGW 3313 Advanced Writing in Educations
Provides instruction in writing for students considering careers in education. Students practice and reflect on writing in professional, public, and academic genres in education, including teaching narratives, classroom ethnographies, case studies, educational policies, standards and outcomes, curricula, syllabi, lessons plans, etc. In a workshop setting, students evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.
ENGW 3314 Advanced Writing in Arts, Media, and Design
Examines writing in fields of architecture, art and design, communication, journalism, music, creative industries, and cinema studies. Students explore writing in a wide array of media and genres. Students also practice writing for a range of public and professional audiences, including scholarly and critical. Particular emphasis will be placed upon understanding different literacies: alphabetic, visual, musical, and sculptural. Genres might include critical reviews, grant writing, promotional pieces, interactive narratives, newspaper articles, and web pages, among others.
ENGW 3315 Interdisciplinary Advanced Writing in the Disciplines
Provides writing instruction for students interested in interdisciplinary study or who wish to explore multiple disciplines. Students practice and reflect on writing in professional, public, and academic genres relevant to their individual experiences and goals. In a workshop setting, students evaluate a wide variety of sources and develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision.

Questions about course suitability can be sent to the Director of Advanced Writing in the Disciplines, Laurie Nardone (l.nardone@northeastern.edu). Registration-specific inquiries can be sent to the English Department’s Administrative Specialist, Jennifer Lobisser (j.lobisser@northeastern.edu).