Unlocking Opportunities! Part Two in a Three Part Series

Welcome back colleagues!

I hope you enjoyed the first part of my story, Why I chose CPS to pursue my dream! Part One in a Three Part Series.

This second part is about what was, for me, a remarkable journey and experience at CPS. My time in the MS COC  program was full of global workplace learning opportunities, intellectual challenges and my personal and professional growth.  There is a quote by Benjamin Franklin that is very close to my heart and my personal philosophy of life: “To succeed, jump as quickly at opportunities as you do at conclusions.”  And, this quote guided me throughout my learning journey at CPS.

Continue reading “Unlocking Opportunities! Part Two in a Three Part Series”

Why I chose CPS to pursue my dream! Part One in a Three Part Series

Overwhelmed, confused, and nervous… I was sitting in front of my computer screen at 2:00 a.m. on a Tuesday night (2014), staring at a list of hundreds of schools around the world that appeared in the search result for “Masters Degree in Communications.”

Education has always been my priority, and I have an endless curiosity and restlessness for learning something new at all times. I had a dream to be the first generation international degree holder in my family. After thinking about it for a couple of years, I made my decision to pursue my dream that night! Continue reading “Why I chose CPS to pursue my dream! Part One in a Three Part Series”

How can Cultural Audits influence the Information Age?

As we forge into this Information Age and World of Robotics, the concept of Human Literacy has been introduced to the stage. What is Human Literacy? Northeastern University President Aoun has proposed Human Literacy to mean our unique abilities to adapt, collaborate, and offer empathy in comparison to computational literacy generated through artificial intelligence. This new use of the term human literacy is an example of a cultural linguistic adjustment in professional studies within higher education. This is where the idea of a cultural audit takes footing. So, what is a cultural audit?

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How ePortfolios capture your professional brand

 

A fundamental skill of all communicators is the ability to tell a compelling story. ePortfolios enable students to tell their own experiential and educational stories, using words, images, and multimedia. A strong ePortfolio makes a statement about your professional brand – who you are, your values, your commitment to lifelong learning.

A judging panel of our Alumni Advisory Council selected three ePortfolios created during the 2017-2018 academic year as outstanding exemplars of what students can create.

Zirui Yan, Sarah Riggs, and Jillian Porazzo share their unique experiences in crafting their ePortfolios.  Hear directly from Linda, Sarah and Jill in this interview by Professor Patty Goodman! (approx.5 min video)

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What would you do if you weren’t afraid? — Lean In To Grow

Lean In To Grow — Event #10 and growing!

On September 17, 2017, Lean In To Grow was first introduced in the Communications Alumni Network Blog by Teeraporn Johsuntorn ’17. As TJ shared, we started this Lean In Circle from scratch. However, we all knew that it would be something beneficial to international female students. Over the past 17 months, we’ve sponsored ten events and directly inspired more than 200 students.

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Five steps to building a personal brand

How do you build a personal brand that distinguishes you from others?

You start by recognizing what a personal brand is not. It’s not a product. And it is not based on  how many followers you have on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or LinkedIn accounts.

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My capstone experience

I am a learner. I love reading articles, books, taking courses – you name it. If I can learn from it, I’m in.

But, even so, it took me a while to go back and get my master’s degree. I knew it would be an investment, and because of that, I wanted to choose wisely. I left college years ago, went on to have a series of great jobs, and slowly came back around to the idea of going back to school.

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Behind the scenes: More than a press release

Surprise! There is more to corporate communications than writing press releases. We showcased this with five Boston-based graduate students, who joined the MilliporeSigma Corporate Communications team for a day. As alumni from the Corporate and Organizational Communication’s program, we know how exciting it can be to apply classroom learning in the real world.

Yilei Zhao, a current student in the MS in Corporate and Organizational Communication, is seated on the far left

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Co-op Turns Into Hire

Career Change

In 2015, Carlos Colon Raldiris, relocated from his island home in Puerto Rico to the vibrant city of Boston to advance his studies in project management at Northeastern University. He completed his undergraduate degree in Public Communication with Film and TV Production at the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras campus. Carlos reminisced about his last semester working as an intern at a small agency called Nostrom Images Group Corp. He assisted in the production processes for TV commercials. In addition, Carlos produced a short movie and a music video for his advanced film courses as a part of his final projects.

Carlos Colon Raldiris at Curry Student Center Mezzanine, Northeastern University on September 21, 2017.

Upon starting classes for his degree in project management, Carlos discovered that the Public Relations concentration within the Masters of Science in Corporate and Organizational Communication was more appealing. He decided to change his direction and pursue this new passion in public relations. “Even if you have an idea or mindset about something, that doesn’t mean that’s what you are going to end up doing,” explained Carlos. He was selected for a co-op offering the opportunity to use his public relations knowledge and broadcasting background.

Landing the Right Co-op

As the saying goes, “third time is the charm.” Carlos first worked at a public relations agency, then a marketing agency. Those two experiential learning opportunities helped to prepare him for his “favorite” and third co-op at American Public Television. Carlos was hired at American Public Television as a Business Development and Marketing Assistant. His role included but was not limited to composing press releases, notification letters to producers and creating marketing materials for international TV buyers at an annual convention in Paris.

Carlos Colon Raldiris is all smiles with Alberto Vasallo (sitting) at his program, Urban Update Boston’s NBC channel 7

Carlos shared, “Northeastern has a great way of preparing students for work,” as he highlighted ways in which he planned for his co-op. During the co-op preparation process, Carlos learned how to connect his personal objectives with his professional endeavors from his co-op course, Career and Development. He researched various organizations and job requirements to ensure they were in line with his career.

Not only had Carlos gained experience in storytelling, media and broadcasting, he also tapped into his acting skills by appearing in a few documentaries as a prop.

The Power of Co-op

The type of real-world experience Carlos attained during his co-op created a pathway for him to apply for a full-time position at WGBH Television. “This co-op helped me to target exactly where I wanted to go,” Carlos shared. His co-op encouraged him to hone his networking skills, cross-cultural communication skills, and gain work experience while completing his masters program. Carlos voiced, “It’s important to learn how to address intercultural differences in the workplace. I experienced this at the office, but I was never frustrated because Northeastern taught me how to deal with it.” He also mentioned how he learned to adjust to different organizational cultures while being cognizant of the various communication styles. One challenge he overcame was learning how to brand himself and network in a room filled with CEOs from popular television networks, such as PBS.

Carlos shared some advice for co-op and job-seekers:

  1. Don’t let the opinion of others dictate where you go. “You need to taste the waters of wherever you want to go.”
  2. Take your co-op seriously, be responsible. But, don’t forget to have fun as well.
  3. Doing a co-op/internship is the best thing,” exclaimed Carlos “everyone should do it if they want to have a successful professional life.
  4. Build relationships with your colleagues in the office. “Don’t always be formal. There are moments when the informal interaction matters.”
  5. Do your job at work, but also check other parts in the office where you can help someone.”

Future Plans

Carlos shared that his third and final co-op was incredibly rewarding. He was able to view the TV industry through different lenses, from co-op student at American Public Television to a full-time Broadcasting Scheduling Assistant at WGBH Television. Carlos will continue to immerse himself in the TV industry. His ultimate career goal is to become a writer/producer of short films and/or documentaries.

Posted by Racquel Muir, CPS ‘17

Have you been to a professional conference lately?

Why were professional conferences developed? My guess is as a means of efficiently delivering professional development to a large group of people at once. It was a one-stop shop for confirming regulations, gathering new knowledge, gaining motivation, and meeting like-minded people. In our information-rich society, we can click a button to gather data, learn tidbits, and communicate with people across the globe. Has this surge of information and social media changed the image of conferences? Is attending conferences a thing of the past?

If I was asked last year, do you plan on attending a conference this year? I would likely have said, I don’t have time. However, I ended up attending five. Yes, five conferences within six months! I do not share this to boast, but am truly shocked myself. Why would I attend so many and was there value? I should provide a bit of explanation. One was associated to a presentation and another was a result of being part of the planning committee. This still leaves three, which does seem like a high number of conferences to attend. Yet, I will tell you that I would do it all again! Below are some visual takeaways.

 

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All of the conferences that I invested my time and resources were associated with different parts of my personal and career development. Although so much information is available at the touch of a button, I don’t make the time or space to focus on it. Do you?

In particular, I was enriched by attending a professional conference with engaging topics. I was stretched by participating in the planning of our college faculty development conference. Moreover, I was fulfilled from attending an empowerment conference and an alumni conference.

Personally, I found there is a difference in sharing a space with others, engaging in conversation, and being outside of my comfort zone. Honestly, I did not gain new knowledge, but I gathered many amazing stories and developed new connections.  Considering the importance of a strong network, I would say I have been able to develop a deeper network. This in turn offers opportunities to build deeper relationships with people having shared interests.

Below are some links to communication related conferences in order of career focus:

So I ask you, have you been to a professional conference lately? If you have found a good conference, please share the conference name in the comments.  If your answer is no, consider finding one that connects with your personal or career goals. You might be surprised how a conference colleague might become part of your inner-circle.

Posted by Patty Goodman, Ed.D., Faculty