Why career development should always be top of mind

Are you happy with your current job? Actively seeking another opportunity? Starting from scratch? It doesn’t matter. Career development should be a priority for each of us. Every day. Here’s why.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average person changes jobs 6 times after the age of 24, and the median employee tenure in a job is about 4 years. So change is a constant in our professional landscape.

Moreover, those of us in communication-related jobs are experiencing first-hand the effects of digital disruption: New communication technologies emerging every day; shifting stakeholder expectations; Artificial Intelligence looming on the horizon.

In this sort of turbulent environment, career development is one thing we have control over. This entails learning new skills, staying on top of trends, and – yes – continuing education. Expanding our professional networks should also be part of every career development plan. A visit to Northeastern’s Employer Engagement and Career Design website shows how you can bolster your networks.

Continue reading “Why career development should always be top of mind”

How to answer the “Why do you want this job?”​ interview question

This question usually comes early on in the interview, often being used by the interviewer as an icebreaker. It’s considered one of the easier interview questions, but there’s definitely a right way to answer it.

Although this is meant as an easy question, there are a few things you’ll need to include:

1.   Your core messages – why you’re qualified/how you can benefit the company. If you’re not sure what I mean by this, I’ll explain more below.

2.   The reason the role excites you

3.   The fact that you understand the job

4.   The fact that you want this job, not just any job at the company

5.   The way the job connects to your career plan

6.   The fact that you intend to stay in the job for awhile

You can see that even though this isn’t meant as a complicated question, it has some elements that you might want to brainstorm about before your interview.

Continue reading “How to answer the “Why do you want this job?”​ interview question”

7 crisis communication tips every organization should master

Mere weeks after Samsung unveiled its Galaxy Note 7, reports surfaced of the smartphone catching fire. Within a month of the device’s launch, the company recalled 2.5 million Note 7s, citing faulty batteries as the cause of the crisis.

What started as a manufacturing mishap quickly escalated into a public relations (PR) nightmare. With customers’ safety at stake, all eyes were on Samsung, which didn’t take full responsibility of the flaw for more than three months after the phone’s recall. The company’s mobile division experienced a 96 percent drop in operating profit as negative headlines continued to emerge, including airlines prohibiting passengers from bringing the phone on flights.

What happened to Samsung could happen to any company; several other brands have faced recalls. For example, Johnson & Johnson pulled its Tylenol products from shelves in 1982 after seven people died in the Chicago area, and Hasbro halted sales in 2007 of its Easy Bake Oven after reports of the toy badly burning children.

Continue reading “7 crisis communication tips every organization should master”