Viral Culture Fellows 2013-2014

Viral Culture Fellowship

The 2013-14 theme of “viral culture” names modes of circulation and transmission of information, ideas, and biota across time and space. The Humanities Center thinks of “viral culture” as a way to  engage an array of important and emergent contemporary phenomena- related to areas as diverse  as social networks, the internet, new media, public health, sexuality, marketing, and globalization.  Viral culture has roots, as well, in fields as diverse as the history of public health, economics,  literature, transportation, and print culture. With this theme, scholars working in diverse fields and periods will consider the ways in which the viral transmission of memes, diseases, electronic signals, print texts-of varied forms of culture-inform new research.

 

Faculty Fellows

Nicole Aljoe 
Assistant Professor, Department of English
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Ryan Cordell 
Assistant Professor, Department of English
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Justin Manjourides 
Assistant Professor, Department of Health Sciences
Bouve College of Health Sciences

Suzanna Danuta Walters 
Professor, Department of Sociology
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Sara Wylie
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

Graduate Fellows

Lana Cook
Ph.D. Candidate, Department of English
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

M.J. Motta 
Ph.D. Candidate, Law and Public Policy
College of Social Sciences and Humanities

This symposium is a learning occasion to reflect on interdisciplinary approaches to the humanities and the role of institutional centers in fostering such collaboration.  In the morning, Kathleen Woodward, our guest keynote, will speak on disciplinary collaboration.  After the keynote, we will have a catered lunch and an opportunity to meet fellow attendees.  After lunch, the “viral culture” fellows will present the “viral culture” website.  This presentation will lead into the roundtable discussion, during which the fellows will discuss their experience in the fellowship group and share the outcomes of their collaboration.  The symposium will close with the Department of English’s 10th Annual Peter Burton Hanson Memorial Lecture featuring Marjorie Agosin who will speak on the intersections of poetry, policy, and urban rights.  The keynote, roundtable, and Hanson lecture will all explore the ways humanities scholars come together through theory, practice, and poetic expression.