THE FIRST THREE STUDENTS TO APPLY TO UNIVERSITY OF DUNDEE FOR FALL 2020 WILL RECEIVE A $1,500 FELLOWSHIP. MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE FELLOWSHIP CAN BE FOUND HERE 

The University of Dundee doesn’t just create your average scientist, they create the full package. They give you the opportunity to work side by side leading research scientists and work with state of the art equipment ~ WENDY MACMILLAN, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES – BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY & DRUG DISCOVERY

Join Northeastern’s newest program in the Life Sciences, based at the University of Dundee -- No. 1 in the UK for research impact. Join fellow NU Biology, Cell and Molecular Biology, Behavioral Neuroscience, and Biochemistry students as you take expanded course offerings in bioinformatics, cell culture, and techniques in biomedicine. Fulfill BIOL3411, BIOL3415, BIOL3409, BIOL5541, BIOT5631, BIOL4707, BIOL3413, BIOL4991, BINF6308, BIOL3609, BIOL5583, BINF6309, or other life sciences and humanities courses. This is a unique opportunity to engage in hands-on research at one of the world's emerging centers for biomedical research.

For those studying abroad in the Spring Semester, there is an option to apply for a competitive summer research internship during May-June in Dundee’s labs that includes a living stipend.

See the Advising Guide for Biology, CMB, and Biochemistry Majors
See the Advising Guide for Behavioral Neuroscience Majors
Overview of Practical Project Opportunities - Next Generation Science at the University of Dundee
BNS-Dundee curriculum mapping_9_19

***Please note that Practical Project B will show up as BIOL4991 but an alternative credit can be awarded if students have already completed BIOL4991.***

 Interested? Please E-mail GEO Advisor, Jeff Sullivan (je.sullivan@northeastern.edu) to discuss the details.

Application Procedure

  • Application Open: January 1, 2020
  • Deadline: March 31, 2020
Submit to GEO
  • GEO Application: All applicants must complete the GEO application. This is the first step for applying to any program.
  • Passport Photo ID: a copy of ID page of government issued passport.
Submit to Host University
  • Host Application: In addition to the GEO application, all applicants must complete the host institution or program’s application.
  • Official Transcript
  • Personal Statement
  • Letter(s) of recommendation
  • Passport Photo ID: a copy of ID page of government issued passport.
  • Photo(s) (passport sized [1x2])
Update My Travel Plans on myNortheastern
Once you have been accepted into your program, you are required to create an entry in My Travel Plans for the trip. Please be sure to enter the following pieces of information:
  • Personal and Emergency Contact Info
  • HealthTravel Info: Dates, flight and accommodation details, etc.
  • Passport Details: Passport number, Expiration date, Passport Country of issue, etc.

Please refer to this step-by-step user’s guide for directions on how to navigate the My Travel Plans system.

Should you fail to complete this step as directed, you may be prevented from traveling, may not receive credit for courses, and/or may be excluded from participating in other Northeastern global programs.

Eligibility Requirements

Study abroad spaces will be filled on a first come first serve basis by qualified students that meet eligibility requirements. The program may fill before the application deadline and will be closed as soon as all spaces are filled.

Minimum Requirements
  • Minimum Cumulative GPA: 2.7
  • Minimum Semesters: Minimum of 3 completed Northeastern semesters at the time of program start date. NUin students are eligible to apply during their first semester on the Boston campus. Transfer and Global Pathways students contact GEO program coordinator for eligibility.
Restrictions
  • Restricted to: Northeastern students from the College of Science. Due to pre-requisites for the courses offered on this program, this is primarily for students studying Biology, Cell and Molecular Biology, Behavioral Neuroscience and Biochemistry. Combined majors should contact their academic adviser.

Studying abroad requires a valid passport. You may also need a visa and/or other travel documents. It is your responsibility to ensure that all your documents are valid and appropriate to the nature of your program.

Courses

The University of Dundee works according to the British, or SCOTCAT, credit system, which means that visiting students can take a maximum course load of 60 University of Dundee credits per semester (65 credits are allowed on a case-by-case basis). Northeastern students will follow a credit conversion scale, as outlined below:

  • The credit conversion ratio is 1:0.2667 (University of Dundee: Northeastern)
  • 60 credits per semester at the University of Dundee is a full-time course load. 
  • A 10-credit University of Dundee course will come is as 2.667 NU credits, a 15-credit University of Dundee course will come in as 4 NU credits, and 20-credit University of Dundee course will come in as 5.33 NU credits.
  • If a student takes 65 University of Dundee credits abroad, they will receive 17.34 NU credits. If a student takes 60 University of Dundee credits abroad, they will receive 16 NU credits. If a student takes 55 University of Dundee credits abroad, they will receive 14.67 NU credits. All three options are considered full-time credit loads. 
  • Course evaluations will not be impacted by the credit conversion change

Each international host university has its own credit system. You should plan on taking what is considered a full-time credit load at the host institution. 

This is a new type of study abroad program; all Dundee courses have been mapped to Northeastern courses. Northeastern has mapped the curriculum for second-semester sophomores and juniors (at time of study abroad) in Biology, Cell and Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, and Behavioral Neuroscience. Students will typically enroll in three science courses and one elective/fourth course.

Please note that the Humanities courses listed below and in the advising guides are last year’s offerings. Updates for Fall 2020 will be available soon.

See the Advising Guide for Biology, CMB, and Biochemistry Majors for more information on choosing Fall courses

See the Advising Guide for Behavioral Neuroscience Majors for more information on choosing Fall courses 

Life Science Courses (Typically Choose 3)
  • BS31006 - Gene Regulation and Expression : (Equivalent to BIOL3411 Current Topics in Cell & Molecular Biology) (note – timetable conflicts with BS31020 – these cannot be taken together) The aim of this module is to introduce specific topics within the area of Gene Regulation and Expression including examples of how defects at the molecular level result in disease. Topics will include transcription, translation, mRNA processing, RNAi and miRNA function and utilisation, DNA recombination and Epigenetics and genetic disease. Students will understand the fundamental processes in molecular biology that are critical for gene expression in relation to cellular function. To be able to apply this knowledge and other information to explain the mechanism by which at least one disease state is manifest by perturbation and mutation of the apparatus to allow normal function. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
  • BS31013 - Biomembranes : (Equivalent to BIOL3415 Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) This module will provide the student with an understanding of the regulation of normal membrane function and the physiological principles underlying this, showing how our current understanding of membrane function has been arrived at using examples from current literature, provide an understanding of some basic cellular and molecular physiological and pharmacological techniques and their application to investigate membrane function and enable the acquisition of skills, attitudes and techniques useful in the pursuit of modern biology. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
  • BS31016 - Practical Techniques in Biomedical Sciences : (Equivalent to BIOL3409 Current Topics in Biology) This module will broaden and strengthen the practical, laboratory research and skills of students. After successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of changes in biological membranes, pre-clinical methods used in drug screening and development, techniques available for evaluating human psychological and/or physiological responses and different types of study design in clinical trials. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
  • BS31019 - Regulatory Physiology and Pharmacology : (Equivalent to BIOL5541 Endocrinology) This module will provide a good understanding of the physiological and pharmacological regulation of body systems for maintaining homeostasis.  After successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how key body systems are regulated by physiological and pharmacological agents in the maintenance of processes such as blood sugar, calcium balance, obesity/appetite/satiety and reproduction. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
  • BS31020 - Experimental Cell Culture : (Equivalent to BIOT5631 Cell Culture Processes for Biopharmaceutical Production) (note – timetable conflicts with BS31006 – these cannot be taken together) To introduce practical tissue culture laboratory skills, and strengthen research and generic skills of students by building on their level 1 and 2 or other previous experience and preparing them for more advanced study. After successful completion of this module students should be able to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the effects of signalling mechanisms on cells and molecules; of the techniques available for evaluating physiological responses in tissue culture cells; and of the principles underlying advanced instrumentation commonly used to assess experiments involving cultured cells e.g. fluorescent microscopes, luminometers. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
Humanities & Arts Courses (Typically Choose 1)
  • EN11001 - Introduction to Literary Study : (Equivalent to ENGL1400 Introduction to Literary Studies) Introduces students to Literary Studies through close examination of the three main literary genres: drama, poetry and the novel. Through close study of relevant examples, the module provides students with fundamental tools for the study of literary texts. Lectures will cover essay writing and referencing skills, tragic and comic forms, performance, irony, genres of poetry, metre and stanza, imagery and symbolism, diegesis, focalisation and other formal aspects of the novel. 20 University of Dundee Credits/5.33 NU Credits.
  • EN11003 - Reading the Screen: An Introduction to Film Studies : (Equivalent to MSCR1990 Elective) provides an introduction to the study of film from a critical and technical perspective, exploring how films are put together, various different styles of filmmaking and a range of directors. The aim is to familiarize you with the vocabulary of film studies through an examination of topics such as directing, editing, mise-en-scene, costume, lighting, framing and composition, auteur theory, genre and representation. By understanding how films work we can perceive how the medium can inform, entertain, manipulate or enthrall the viewer. 20 University of Dundee Credits/5.33 NU Credits.
  • HU11001 - Human Futures : (Equivalent to ENGL1990 Elective) A distinctive characteristic of human culture — and something that distinguishes humans as a species — is our capacity and instinct to imagine the future.  This course helps you to explore the rich variety of imagined futures across time and place through a study of examples based mainly upon historical, literary and philosophical texts. 20 University of Dundee Credits/5.33 NU Credits.
  • EN22002 - Romantic to Victorian Literature : (Equivalent to ENGL2270 Victorian Literature) The texts studied in this course form an introduction to one of the most appealing, varied and accessible phases in the recent history of English Literature. The work of the great Romantic poets is read along with a series of 19th century novels which link closely with the themes and moods of the poetry. These novels bring out, in fact, the powerful strand of Gothic Romanticism which is the counterweight to the social realism of the Victorian novel. 20 University of Dundee Credits/5.33 NU Credits.
  • EN22006 - National Cinemas Post-1945 : (Equivalent to MSCR1990 Elective) This module examines a variety of cinematic movements from a global perspective. Exploring seminal films from Britain and Europe as well as the national cinemas of Japan, Iran and Africa this module will enhance student awareness of film-historical contexts and the language of film criticism and analysis more broadly. 20 University of Dundee Credits/5.33 NU Credits.
  • HY11005 - The Rise of Atlantic Empires, 1500-1750 : (Equivalent to HIST1990 Elective) This module will provide a comparative understanding of the development of European Empires in Africa and the Americas between 1500-1750. It will also examine the origins of modern “globalization” and improve your ability to read original sources (in English translation) and use them towards constructive argument. You will gain an understanding of the major forces that shaped the expansion of Europe from the 15th to the 18th Centuries and an appreciation of the comparative development of British, French, Spanish and Dutch empires. 20 University of Dundee Credits/5.33 NU Credits.
  • HY11007 - The History of Dundee, 1700-2000 : (Equivalent to HIST1990 Elective) Offers an introduction to the history of the city of Dundee. It introduces students to the periodization of the city’s history. It contrasts Dundee with other Scottish cities, primarily Edinburgh and Glasgow. It sets the history of Dundee in its global context. The aim is to enable students to understand specific architectural, social and economic features of the city in historical context. Taught in the evening. 10 University of Dundee credits/2.67 NU Credits.
  • HU11004 - Understanding Race in America : (Equivalent to SOCL2270 Race and Ethnic Relations) The aim of this course is to offer critical examination of the construction and history of race and racial politics in the United States since the colonial period to modern times. Students should demonstrate an understanding of the development of race relations, racism, and its continuous impact on modern American identity, politics, its legal system, society, arts, culture, and economy. Taught in the evening. 10 Dundee credits/2.67 NU Credits.
  • PI22006 - Aesthetics : (Equivalent to PHIL2990 Elective) Aesthetics is the branch of philosophy concerned with the nature of art and with judgments concerning art. This course examines both art and art criticism using techniques and methods derived from European Philosophy. The course begins by examining how Immanuel Kant responds to the question of art, and then how a number of French and German-language philosophers continue on this debate in the nineteenth and twentieth century. 20 University of Dundee Credits/5.33 NU Credits.
  • PI31022 - Fear, Anxiety, and Courage in Philosophy and Film : (Equivalent to PHIL1667 Science Fiction/Film: Ethics (NUpath (DD) Difference/Diversity & NUpath (ER) Ethical Reasoning). In modernity, anxiety for the first time enters the ranks of the philosophical concept. Relatively late, Martin Heidegger will famously distinguish between fear (that always has an object) and anxiety (that is without concrete object) and argue that the latter – by shattering all certainties – liberates us from our attachments to external objects and to the ordinary course of the world. This experience is so fundamentally disorienting that, in turn, it allows for a new orientation in and toward the world to arise. Anxiety gains the status of a philosophical concept because it is conceptually linked to a potential experience of freedom. Freedom thus, as Heidegger suggests, necessitates a peculiar form of courage, “the courage to be anxious”. 30 University of Dundee Credits/8.00 NU Credits (Note: To take this course, you will likely need to take just two science courses – best for Philosophy Minors or Double Majors in a life science major and in Philosophy).
  • PI11006 - Plato and the Good Life : (Equivalent to PHIL2990 Elective) This module introduces philosophy through the works of Plato and by asking the question: what is the good life?  This question and Plato’s answers to it are among the most enduring themes in the Western tradition of thought.  20 University of Dundee Credits/5.33 NU Credits.
Evaluated Courses

All courses taken abroad must successfully be evaluated through the course equivalency process. To review the course equivalencies process and database please click here.

Policies & Procedures

Prior to application, please review GEO’s policies and procedures. This is the student’s responsibility.

Course Approval Form
Students must confirm their study abroad courses and corresponding Northeastern equivalents with their academic advisors for approval, using the online course approval process. This is located on myNortheastern within Services & Links, under Experiential Learning/Co-op, labeled Global Experiences/Study Abroad Course Selection. Please note that only academic advisors can confirm how a Northeastern equivalent will fit into students’ degree audits, and if it will fulfill any degree requirements.

Cost

Northeastern Tuition: $
  • Tuition covers 12-16 Northeastern credits. On certain programs students may be required by the host institution to enroll in a course load that could exceed 16 credits. If a student elects to transfer back more than four courses (or 16 credits), then the student will incur an overload fee as defined by the Northeastern University Registrar’s website. 

International Security and Emergency Support: $100
  • This fee covers International Security and Emergency Support.

Students are responsible for all other expenses, including housing and other non-academic costs for which they will be billed directly by the program provider or host institution. Students are also responsible for arranging and purchasing their own flights.

GEO offers scholarships and grants for students studying abroad on Traditional programs. Please visit our Scholarships page for more info!

Resources

Additional Resources

Application Procedure

  • Application Open: July 1, 2019
  • Deadline: September 30, 2019
Submit to GEO
  • GEO Application: All applicants must complete the GEO application. This is the first step for applying to any program.
  • Passport Photo ID: a copy of ID page of government issued passport.
  • Photo(s) (passport sized [1x2])
Submit to Host University
  • Host Application: In addition to the GEO application, all applicants must complete the host institution or program’s application.
  • Official Transcript
  • Personal Statement
  • Letter(s) of recommendation
  • Passport Photo ID: a copy of ID page of government issued passport.
  • Photo(s) (passport sized [1x2])
Update My Travel Plans on myNortheastern
Once you have been accepted into your program, you are required to create an entry in My Travel Plans for the trip. Please be sure to enter the following pieces of information:
  • Personal and Emergency Contact Info
  • HealthTravel Info: Dates, flight and accommodation details, etc.
  • Passport Details: Passport number, Expiration date, Passport Country of issue, etc.

Please refer to this step-by-step user’s guide for directions on how to navigate the My Travel Plans system.

Should you fail to complete this step as directed, you may be prevented from traveling, may not receive credit for courses, and/or may be excluded from participating in other Northeastern global programs.

Eligibility Requirements

Study abroad spaces will be filled on a first come first serve basis by qualified students that meet eligibility requirements. The program may fill before the application deadline and will be closed as soon as all spaces are filled.

Minimum Requirements
  • Minimum Cumulative GPA: 2.7
  • Minimum Semesters: Minimum of 3 completed Northeastern semesters at the time of program start date. NUin students are eligible to apply during their first semester on the Boston campus. Transfer and Global Pathways students contact GEO program coordinator for eligibility.
Restrictions
  • Restricted to: Northeastern students from the College of Science. Due to pre-requisites for the courses offered on this program, this is primarily for students studying Biology, Cell and Molecular Biology, Behavioral Neuroscience and Biochemistry.

Studying abroad requires a valid passport. You may also need a visa and/or other travel documents. It is your responsibility to ensure that all your documents are valid and appropriate to the nature of your program.

Courses

The University of Dundee works according to the British, or SCOTCAT, credit system, which means that visiting students can take a maximum course load of 60 University of Dundee credits per semester (65 credits are allowed on a case-by-case basis). Northeastern students will follow a credit conversion scale, as outlined below:

  • The credit conversion ratio is 1:0.2667 (University of Dundee: Northeastern)
  • 60 credits per semester at the University of Dundee is a full-time course load. 
  • A 10-credit University of Dundee course will come is as 2.667 NU credits, a 15-credit University of Dundee course will come in as 4 NU credits, and 20-credit University of Dundee course will come in as 5.33 NU credits.
  • If a student takes 65 University of Dundee credits abroad, they will receive 17.34 NU credits. If a student takes 60 University of Dundee credits abroad, they will receive 16 NU credits. If a student takes 55 University of Dundee credits abroad, they will receive 14.67 NU credits. All three options are considered full-time credit loads. 
  • Course evaluations will not be impacted by the credit conversion change

Each international host university has its own credit system. You should plan on taking what is considered a full-time credit load at the host institution. 

This is a new type of study abroad program; all Dundee courses have been mapped to Northeastern courses. Northeastern has mapped the curriculum for second-semester sophomores and juniors (at time of study abroad) in Biology, Cell and Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, and Behavioral Neuroscience. Students will typically enroll in three science courses (two in one block and one in the other block) and one elective/fourth course.

See the Advising Guide for Biology, CMB, and Biochemistry Majors for more information on choosing Spring courses

See the Advising Guide for Behavioral Neuroscience Majors for more information on choosing Spring courses 

Life Science Courses - Block C (First Half of Semester)
  • BS32006 - Cell Signaling : (Equivalent to BIOL4707 Cell & Molecular Bio) This course will cover methods of cell-to-cell communication, signal transduction pathways, key proteins in signal transduction and downstream effects. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
  • BS32008 - Plant Sciences : (Equivalent to BIOL3413 Current Topics Org/Pop) This course will study the structures and diversities of plant genomes, plant sexual strategies, plant responses to the environment, hormonal signalling, developmental programming, seasonal change, symbionts and pathogens.  Learning Outcomes include plant genomes, plants and the environment, plants and human welfare, plant development, plants and their biotic environment and plant improvement. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
  • BS32011 - Practical Project A : (Equivalent to BIOL4991 Research) (note – timetable conflicts with BS32026 and BS32028 – these cannot be taken together) This course will offer a range of projects related to specialist courses in your spring study abroad semester. Project Titles include: Applied Bioinformatics / Microbial Cell Biology / Molecular Biochemistry. Check out the practical projects you can engage in. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
  • BS32026 - Sensory & Motor Neuroscience : (Equivalent to BIOL3415 Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) (note – timetable conflicts with BS32011 – these cannot be taken together) This course will provide an opportunity to acquire a good understanding of the physiology and anatomy of systems that govern the sensory perception and motor function. After successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how nervous systems, in particular the motor and sensory systems, are built and function, using examples from all stages of neural organization (at the molecular, cellular, circuits and systems levels). 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
  • BS32028 - Molecular Pharmacology : (Equivalent to BIOL3415 Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience) (note – timetable conflicts with BS32011 – these cannot be taken together) This course will provide an understanding of the fundamental principles of molecular pharmacology, from drug receptor interactions to activation of intracellular signalling cascades. After successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate and explain the basic principles of receptor pharmacology, with a focus on G protein coupled receptor structure, signalling and function. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
  • BS32029 - Cell Proliferation & Survival Mechanisms Underlying Disease : (Equivalent to BIOL4707 Cell & Molecular Bio) This course will provide a firm grounding in key molecular mechanisms and pathways underpinning proliferation and survival relevant to the development of cancer and other  disease-related themes. Additionally, it will  provide  an insight into the  experimental approaches that have advanced the field of cancer biology . Topics  covered will include reversible post-translational modification of proteins and the  nature/function of the enzymes that mediate these processes, with emphasis on their  dysregulation in cancer; major pathways controlling proliferation and survival including  cell cycle regulation and programmed cell death; key principles by which transcriptional  regulation underpinning the control of gene expression is perturbed during cancer   development;  pathological mechanisms (with emphasis on post-translational  modification) by which stimulatory and inhibitory signals regulate cell cycle control  through selective gene expression in cancer ; and general therapeutic strategies in  cancer based on the understanding of these pathways. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
  • BS32031 - Bioinformatics Research Skills 1 : (Equivalent to BINF 6308 Bioinformatics Computational Methods 1) This course will develop key skills required for conducting research/analysis with bioinformatics approaches. Topics include Using the Unix environment, Version control and collaborative working, and Data analysis and manipulation with Python. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
Life Science Courses - Block D (Second Half of Semester)
  • BS32003 - Drug Discovery & Development : (Equivalent to CHEM4700 Topics in Organic Chemistry) (note – timetable conflicts with BS33024 – these cannot be taken together) This course will give an understanding of the process involved in identifying drug targets and developing drugs against that target including assay development.  The main topics discussed include target identification, assay development, pharmacokinetics, and structure activity relationships (SAR). Students will gain a knowledge and understanding of the drug development process from target identification to assay development and pre-clinical trials. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
  • BS32005 - Cell & Develop Biology : (Equivalent to BIOL3609 Developmental Biology) This course will introduce students to the specialist area of study of developmental biology. To give the student an understanding of the stages and processes involved in the development of organisms. Topics include: Morphogenesis, patterning embryos, patterning tissues, morphogenetic movements, development and diseases stem cells. Students will be able to explain broad aspects of the development of vertebrates and invertebrates and what happens when these processes go wrong and will develop their literature review skills, and group working and ways of presenting information in an informative manner. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
  • BS32009 - Immunology : (Equivalent to BIOL5583 Immunology) This course will provide students with a broad understanding of key topics in immunology. This course will underpin more specialised areas of  immunology. The course aims to strengthen students’ skills in problem solving, critical analysis of scientific literature and will be able to explain central concepts in the field of immunology and relate this to protection against infectious disease. Students will be able to explain central concepts in the field of immunology and relate this to protection against infectious disease, innate immune mechanisms that sense and eliminate pathogens, processing and presentation of antigenic material to drive immune responses, antibody-mediated protection, development and activation of B and T lymphocytes, lymphocyte function, mucosal immune defences, immunological memory and vaccination, immunity to viruses, immunodeficiency diseases, autoimmune diseases and immune hyper reactivity. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
  • BS32010 - Applied Bioinformatics : (Equivalent to BINF 6309 Bioinformatics Computational Methods 2. Note – timetable conflicts with BS32024 and BS32020 – these cannot be taken together). This course build on the basic bioinformatics introduced in Years 1 and 2, and give students a broad understanding of modern bioinformatics using Python programming and bioinformatics toolkits to study algorithms used for phylogeny, data mining, interpretation of high throughput data including next generation sequencing analysis and statistical evaluation of the relevance of results. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
  • BS32012 - Practical Project B : (Equivalent to BIOL4991 Research OR BIOL3409, 3411, 3413, or 3415, depending on the topic. Note – timetable conflicts with BS32024 and BS32020 – these cannot be taken together)) This course will offer a range of projects related to specialist courses in your study abroad semester. Project Titles include: Plant Science Synthetic Biology Drug Discovery and fragment synthesis. Check out the practical projects you can engage in. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
  • BS32020 - Human Epithelial Biology : (Equivalent to BIOL3409 Current Topics in Biology) This course will provide a good understanding of the physiology and pharmacology of the human respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal systems. After successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the functions and related pharmacology of respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal systems in human physiology. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
  • BS32024 - Neuropsychopharmacology : (Equivalent to BIOL3415 Current Topics in Behavioral Neuroscience. Note – timetable conflicts with BS32012 and BS32010 – these cannot be taken together.) This course will provide students with a good knowledge and understanding of chemical transmission within the central nervous system and how this may be modulated to achieve therapeutic benefit in several disorders of nervous system function. After successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate chemical transmission within the central nervous system, pathological mechanisms involved in disorders of the central nervous system and the modulation of chemical transmission to achieve therapeutic benefit. 15 University of Dundee Credits/4 NU Credits.
Fourth Course - Online Course Options through Northeastern
  • INSH/PSYC 2101 - Love and Hate: Social, Psychological, and Literary Approaches : NU Path IC, SI Studies materials that define and describe love and hate from the fields of literature and literary criticism, social psychology, and criminology and criminal justice. Love and hate are small words describing powerful emotions with profound effects on individuals and on social groups. Focusing largely on contemporary examples, offers students an opportunity to analyze the differences and areas of overlap in the above fields’ approaches to love and hate, to discuss societal responses to these emotions, and to apply the methodologies of each field to research questions of their own. INSH 2101 and PSYC 2101 are cross-listed. 4 Northeastern Credits.
  • HIST 2211 - The World Since 1945 : NUPath DD, SI Examines the political, economic, social, and cultural relationship between the developed and developing world since the end of World War II. Topics include the Cold War, independence and national movements in developing countries, the globalization of the world economy, scientific and technological innovations, wealth and poverty, the eradication of some diseases and the spread of others, the fall of the Soviet Union, Middle East turmoil, and the enduring conflict between Israel and Palestine. 4 Northeastern Credits
  • PHIL1195 - Research Ethics : NUPath ER, SI. Addresses how to engage in scientific, medical, and technological research in an ethically responsible manner. Research is crucial to understanding social, environmental, and health problems, as well as to developing effective responses to them. If the paradigm of responsible research is too restrictive, the benefits of scientific progress and technological innovation can be delayed or unrealized. At the same time, researchers have a responsibility to protect research subjects, to appropriately engage with members of the community, and to avoid behaving in ways that undermine scientific research in the long run. Explores the many ethical dimensions of research, and introduces students to the ethical foundations and controversies that are central to developing appropriate ethical frameworks for engaging in research. 4 Northeastern Credits.
  • CLTR1240 - Latin American Film : NUPath IC Examines contemporary works of cinematography in Latin America, focusing on the culture and imagery of the Spanish-, French-, and Portuguese-speaking peoples of the Western hemisphere, including the United States. Critically engages–from a technical (cinematographic), genre, and sociohistorical perspective–topics of history, memory, and cultural resiliency; colonialism, racism, and patriarchy; dictatorship, revolution, and democratization; and nationalism, dependency, and globalization. Conducted in English; most films are in French, Portuguese, or Spanish with English subtitles. 4 Northeastern Credits.
  • ENGW3315 - Interdisciplinary Advanced Writing in the Disciplines : NUPath AWD. Offers writing instruction for students interested in interdisciplinary study or who wish to explore multiple disciplines. Students practice and reflect on writing in professional, public, and academic genres relevant to their individual experiences and goals. In a workshop setting, offers students an opportunity to evaluate a wide variety of sources and to develop expertise in audience analysis, critical research, peer review, and revision. Several Versions of AWD may be offered. Please stay tuned. 
Fourth Course - Humanities/Arts Course Options at the University of Dundee
  • EN11006 - Early Modern Literature : (Equivalent to ENGL2240 17th Century British Literature) This module surveys the development of English Literature from the Early Modern period to the middle of the Eighteenth century in relation to the ideas of the Enlightenment and the emergence of modern culture, with its concerns about identity, gender, religion, and power.  The module will explore Early Modern drama, including texts by William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, John Webster; metaphysical poetry including work by John Donne, Andrew Marvell, John Milton; and the rise of the novel form, including work by Daniel Defoe or Samuel Richardson. 20 University of Dundee Credits/5.33 NU Credits.
  • EN21004 - Modernist to Contemporary Literature : (Equivalent to ENGL3730 20th/21st Century Major Figures) This course surveys 20th and 21st century writing, paying particular attention to the way fiction, poetry and drama develops out of earlier traditions and tendencies and how they break from earlier movements. It examines how the forces of modernity – industrialization, urbanization, technological changes, war, empire, migration challenges previous ways of structuring and making sense of the world through a range of 20th and 21st century texts including: fiction by Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, Katherine Mansfield, Angela Carter, Chinua Achebe, Bernard Malamud and Michel Faber; poetry by T.S. Eliot, W.B. Yeats, Mina Loy, W.H. Auden, Seamus Heaney, Geoffrey Hill, Carol Ann Duffy and Margaret Atwood; drama by Harold Pinter and Caryl Churchill; and a ‘graphic novel’ by Keiji Nakazawa. 20 University of Dundee Credits/5.33 NU Credits.
  • HU11004 - Understanding Race in America : (Equivalent to SOCL2270 Race and Ethnic Relations, NUPath DD Credit for Special Section Pending) The aim of this course is to offer critical examination of the construction and history of race and racial politics in the United States since the colonial period to modern times. Students should demonstrate an understanding of the development of race relations, racism, and its continuous impact on modern American identity, politics, its legal system, society, arts, culture, and economy. Taught in the evening. 10 Dundee credits/2.67 NU Credits.
  • PI11009 - Technology and the Human : PI11009- Technology and the Human: (Equivalent to ARTH1100 Interactive Media and Society) This course aims to introduce students to key philosophical and ethical perspectives on the role of technology in human lives. Students will have the chance to engage with philosophical texts and traditions of argumentation that reflect on the nature of technology itself, as well as the role it plays in transforming human practices and self-understanding. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to identify and articulate philosophical views on technology and evaluate its normative impact on contemporary society. Taught in the evening. 10 University of Dundee credits/2.67 NU Credits.
  • EN12008 - Comics and Other Media : EN12008- Comics and Other Media: (Equivalent to ARTH1990) The course has several aims; to allow students to study comics history, and the formal properties of the medium; to foster an understanding of comics texts through critical analysis and creative work; to provide students with an opportunity to explore the interaction of comics and graphic novels with other media. The course combines a critical history of the comics and other media with practical exercises and assignments. There will be 5 x 3 hour workshops on Saturday mornings. The workshops comprise of a lecture/seminar and creative component, with each session ending with a reflection on the creative work with feedback from the tutors and peers. For the creative element, students may concentrate on a particular aspect of comics e.g. writing or art, and there will be an opportunity for collaboration. Taught on Saturdays. 10 University of Dundee credits/2.67 NU Credits.
  • EN22004 - Film Noir: The Dark Side of the Street : (Equivalent to MSCR 1990 Elective) This course examines the development of film noir as a counter tradition within Hollywood cinema and as a product of a culture impacted by wartime and Cold War politics.  The module is divided into three distinct sections.  Beginning with the origins of noir we examine the influence of emigre filmmakers on the development of the noir style, engaging with German Expressionist cinema and French Poetic Realism.  Progressing to Hollywood cinema the module explores some of the best films of the so-called classical period of film noir (1941-1948) and the influence of these texts on the development of 1960s and 1970s neo-noir.  The module concludes with a consideration of the wider influence of film noir on cinematic culture.  Organized around staff research interests we explore the relationship between film noir and the Gothic, film noir and Shakespeare (Shaxnoir) and film noir and science fiction. 20 University of Dundee Credits/5.33 NU Credits.
  • HY11004 - The Age of Revolution, 1750-1850 : (Equivalent to HIST1990 Elective) What do we mean by the term ‘revolution’ and are there differing definitions of what is meant by revolution when applied to events taking place across Europe and North America during the period 1750 to 1850? This module aims to address such questions by examining the political and social impact of revolution in America and France, the causes and consequences of Industrial Revolution in Britain, the revolution in ideas during the Enlightenment, over the period 1750 and 1850, and debates and interpretations about this ‘age of revolution’. 20 University of Dundee Credits/5.33 NU Credits.
Evaluated Courses

All courses taken abroad must successfully be evaluated through the course equivalency process. To review the course equivalencies process and database please click here.

Policies & Procedures

Prior to application, please review GEO’s policies and procedures. This is the student’s responsibility.

Course Approval Form
Students must confirm their study abroad courses and corresponding Northeastern equivalents with their academic advisors for approval, using the online course approval process. This is located on myNortheastern within Services & Links, under Experiential Learning/Co-op, labeled Global Experiences/Study Abroad Course Selection. Please note that only academic advisors can confirm how a Northeastern equivalent will fit into students’ degree audits, and if it will fulfill any degree requirements.

Cost

Northeastern Tuition: $
  • Tuition covers 12-16 Northeastern credits. On certain programs students may be required by the host institution to enroll in a course load that could exceed 16 credits. If a student elects to transfer back more than four courses (or 16 credits), then the student will incur an overload fee as defined by the Northeastern University Registrar’s website. 

International Security and Emergency Support: $100
  • This fee covers International Security and Emergency Support.

Students are responsible for all other expenses, including housing and other non-academic costs for which they will be billed directly by the program provider or host institution. Students are also responsible for arranging and purchasing their own flights.

GEO offers scholarships and grants for students studying abroad on Traditional programs. Please visit our Scholarships page for more info!

Resources

Additional Resources

Destination

The Sunday Times recently named Dundee one of the top 12 places to live in Britain. It is also one of the sunniest cities in Scotland!

Dundee is a post-industrial city situated on the northern banks of the Firth of Tay. The city originally thrived as a center of whaling, shipbuilding, and commercial marmalade production. Today, Dundee is an emerging centre of 21st century design for Scotland and the world. It is now home to the first V&A Museum of Design outside of London. Dundee, which will occupy a prime site at the heart of Dundee’s redeveloped waterfront.

Dundee has perhaps the finest location of any Scottish city, according to Lonely Planet Scotland. It is strategically located less than 90 minutes from Edinburgh, St. Andrews, Glasgow and Aberdeen, and is well connected by rail. The Scottish Highlands north of Dundee are also easily accessible and a must-see for study abroad students.

Accommodations

Please remember that Northeastern University does not arrange accommodations for you while you are abroad – this is your responsibility. You should follow all of your host institution’s or housing provider’s procedures and deadlines for obtaining housing. Failure to do so may mean you are not able to arrange housing through the program.

  • Student Residence: We have four residential complexes – Heathfield (426 residents), Belmont (450 residents), Seabraes (411 residents) and West Park (300 residents). The complexes comprise approximately 50 self-contained flats (each flat has its own kitchen and dining space) for between five and ten residents. Bedrooms are all single occupancy and are sized approximately 13 or 15 sq.m. (including the private bathroom). Kitchens are equipped with cooker, fridge/freezer, microwave and kettle. The WiFi and superfast wired broadband will supercharge your study sessions and let you stay connected with friends. Each flat has a well-equipped kitchen and there’s a laundry on site. Staying in Dundee’s accommodation means there are no hidden costs as all electricity costs, maintenance and personal property insurance are included in the price. The majority of Dundee’s accommodation is on campus, or just across the road, and couldn’t be any closer to classes, the library and the students’ union. Not much of a morning commute! Click here for an overview of Dundee’s student accommodation!

Host University or Organization

The University of Dundee has approximately 18,000 students, 60% of whom are from Scotland, 20% from elsewhere in the UK and 20% from the EU or overseas. The majority of students live on or near the University campus situated next to Dundee’s cultural quarter. Theatres, art-house cinema, restaurants, galleries, bars, boutiques and craft shops are all within 5 minutes walking distance – no car necessary!

The University of Dundee has an international reputation and attracts top-class students from across the world. The University of Dundee is ranked #1 in the UK and #26 in the world for research impact by Nature Index 2017. The “State of Innovation” report by Clarivate Analytics ranks Dundee as the most influential scientific research institution in the world for pharmaceuticals for the period 2006-16. In addition, University of Dundee is ranked #1 in the UK for student satisfaction in Biology by the National Student Survey in 2017.

Advisors