This Dialogue explores education and learning in Ghana, West Africa. It involves gaining knowledge of the country’s educational system from primary schools to higher education. Students will engage with Ghanaian students in various ways by attending the various types of institutions including: The School for the Blind (soccer game), The School for the Deaf (drumming presentation), The Special Needs School (reading to students), interviewing college students, and interacting with college faculty, administrators, and staff members. Participants will visit and reside on the campuses of five of Ghana’s premiere colleges or universities. They will discuss education in Ghana with diplomats from organizations such as the US Embassy in Ghana and the United Nations in Ghana. They will visit a medical and law school in the country to discover how they differ in Ghana than in the US and their roles in country development. Students will compile a portfolio that makes evident their understanding of education and learning in Ghana and reflects their learning as a result of participating in the Dialogue. The portfolio will consist of students’ experiences with educational institutions in the country, reflections on those experiences, and “artifacts” that represent their own learning. Such artifacts include materials about the educational institutions at that they visited, materials from cultural activities in which they participated, and others that they feel are relevant to their experiences in Ghana. Students will choose an Adinkra symbol that best represents them individually and their experiences in Ghana. (Adinkra symbols are visual symbols that represent concepts and original thoughts). For another assignment, students will work in teams on a project that contributes to their learning college student development theories and how they manifest in Ghanaian institutions of higher education by creating a Ghanaian College Student Development Theory. Individually, students will explore student affairs administration in Ghana colleges and universities by writing a Functional Area Research Paper that explores such areas as student activities, student involvement, career services, etc.

Students will engage in local communities in various ways. First, we will visit schools from elementary to high school. They will interact with students attending the Special Needs school (read stories), the School for the Blind (play soccer), and the School for the Deaf (drumming performance). They will have meals with and conduct interviews with college students attending Ghanaian colleges and universities. Students will participate in drumming and dancing lessons, craft making, and make presentations based on what they learned about college student development to Ghanaian student affairs administrators. Students will visit the US Embassy in Ghana and the United Nations to explore the strengths and challenges of education in the country.

Application Procedure

  • Application Open: November 1, 2019
  • Application Deadline: December 3, 2019
  • Application Extension Deadline: February 15, 2020
Submit to GEO
  • GEO Application: All applicants must complete the GEO application. This is the first step for applying to any program.
  • $500 non-refundable deposit: Deposits must be paid through NUPay. Be sure to select the appropriate summer term.
  • Photocopy of Passport: This is to be given to your faculty leader after acceptance.
  • Faculty Interview: Faculty will schedule interviews with applicants of interest to determine acceptance. The interviews can occur anytime before the final deadline.
  • Essay Questions: Answer each question in 2-3 paragraphs (completed online via GEO application).
    • What are your personal and academic reasons for wishing to participate in this Dialogue of Civilizations program?
    • How will the program further your academic and career goals?
    • What is your previous travel and language experience, if any?
    • What courses have you taken which are directly relevant to the program?

Applications are not considered complete until deposit is received. This deposit will be applied to the full cost of the program.

Update My Travel Plans on myNortheastern
Once you have been accepted into the program and your the flight and accommodation details have been shared with you, you are required to create an entry in My Travel Plans for the trip. Please be sure to enter the following pieces of information:
  • Personal and Emergency Contact Info
  • HealthTravel Info: Dates, flight and accommodation details, etc.
  • Passport Details: Passport number, Expiration date, Passport Country of issue, etc.

Please refer to this step-by-step user’s guide for directions on how to navigate the My Travel Plans system.

Should you fail to complete this step as directed, you may be prevented from traveling, may not receive credit for courses, and/or may be excluded from participating in other Northeastern global programs.

Eligibility Requirements

Studying abroad requires a valid passport. You may also need a visa and/or other travel documents. It is your responsibility to ensure that all your documents are valid and appropriate to the nature of your program.

Minimum Requirements
  • Minimum Cumulative GPA: 2.50
  • Minimum Semesters: Minimum of 2 completed Northeastern semesters at the time of program start date. NUin students are eligible to apply. Transfer and Global Pathways students contact GEO program coordinator for eligibility.
Other Requirements
  • Possible Student Challenges: This program requires that students make sure they are hydrated through the trip. Students should also make sure that they bring enough mosquito repellent to last throughout the trip. On a few occasions there are lengthy bus rides between cities, about four hours each time

Courses

This undergraduate course will explore education and learning in educational institutions in Ghana, West Africa. Students will explore learning in primary, junior, secondary schools and institutions of higher education in the context of Ghanaian policies, structures, and culture. Students will explore issues of educating the Ghanaian citizenry in contrast to issues faced in the United States. They will be exposed to the current standards of education in Ghana and the policies that guide them. Participants will be exposed to the educational opportunities available as alternatives to those students not admitted to institutions of higher education. Students will witness how Ghanaian culture educates its students with disabilities.

Students will visit educational institutions in Ghana from primary, junior, and secondary schools to institutions of higher education. These institutions will represent the various types of available to students in the country such as private, public, vocational as well as those for special populations such as students with disabilities. Northeastern students will not only attend classes with students at their respective educational institutions, but they will also engage in conversations with the educators and students about learning and education in their country. Prior to departure, students will prepare for the Dialogue by doing group presentations of education in Ghana based on literature. Students will examine their own notions about education and learning in pre- and post-learning statements, through reflection in daily journals, and through the compilation of a portfolio.

This Dialogue will enhance participants’ cultural competency by exposing them to international perspectives in education and learning. They will gain an understanding of education not just for individual social mobility but also for national development. they will be exposed to education that infuses African culture by way of Ghana into educational systems. Students witness the pride and dignity of Ghanaian students, faculty, and administrators. Students see the importance of cultural artifacts in educational systems to developing individual and national pride.

  • CAEP2010 - Counseling and Applied Educational Psychology in a Global Context: Education and Learning in Ghana : This undergraduate course will explore education and learning in educational institutions in Ghana, West Africa. Students will explore learning in primary, junior, secondary schools and institutions of higher education in the context of Ghanaian policies, structures, and culture.   Students will explore issues of educating the Ghanaian citizenry in contrast to issues faced in the United States. They will be exposed to the current standards of education in Ghana and the policies that guide them. Participants will be exposed to the educational opportunities available as alternatives to those students not admitted to institutions of higher education. Students will witness how Ghanaian culture educates its students with disabilities. This course includes a service-learning component which are “hands-on service roles and projects by which students learn about and apply course concepts while intentionally addressing the needs/interests identified by our community partners”.   Learning Outcomes of Service-Learning for Dialogue of Civilization to Ghana 1. Identify skills that participants can use to contribute to or engage in throughout their experiences while in Ghana. 2. Analyze one or more social issues through the lens of education and learning in Ghana. 3. Identify community needs being addressed by students participating in the Dialogue. 4. Integrate the relationship between course concepts and students’ learning experiences. 5. Demonstrate critical reflection of service through guided activities of the Dialogue. Dialogue to Ghana: Education and Learning in Ghana Service-learning Activities Pre-Departure Husky Starter Fund collection site to raise money for computers for the Church of Christ Basic School and the School for the Deaf Secondary School.  Also, money will be used to purchase braillers for the School for the Blind. Donation of materials for hygiene kits for St. Monica’s High School for Girls
  • CAEP2020 - International Perspectives on Student Services and Higher Education-Ghana : This undergraduate course explores Student Affairs/Services and College Student Development in the context of Ghanaian culture and society examines the administration of student services/affairs and college student development in institutions of higher education in Ghana, West Africa. Students will explore issues of access, student development and higher education administration. Students will consider college student development theories as they relate to Ghanaian students. They will also engage in a comparative analysis of Ghanaian colleges and universities with those of the United States. This course includes a service-learning component which are “hands-on service roles and projects by which students learn about and apply course concepts while intentionally addressing the needs/interests identified by our community partners”.   Learning Outcomes of Service-Learning for Dialogue of Civilization to Ghana 1. Identify skills that participants can use to contribute to or engage in throughout their experiences while in Ghana. 2. Analyze one or more social issues through the lens of education and learning in Ghana. 3. Identify community needs being addressed by students participating in the Dialogue. 4. Integrate the relationship between course concepts and students’ learning experiences. 5. Demonstrate critical reflection of service through guided activities of the Dialogue. Dialogue to Ghana: Education and Learning in Ghana Service-learning Activities Pre-Departure Husky Starter Fund collection site to raise money for computers for the Church of Christ Basic School and the School for the Deaf Secondary School.  Also, money will be used to purchase braillers for the School for the Blind. Donation of materials for hygiene kits for St. Monica’s High School for Girls

Cost

Northeastern Tuition: Summer term tuition as published by Northeastern
Dialogue of Civilizations Fee: $3,000
  • Northeastern Tuition and DOC Fee Includes: 8 Northeastern credits, international roundtrip airfare from Boston, accommodations for program duration, international security and emergency support, and program related expenses (local transportation, field trips, excursions and some group meals)

Additional Expense - Meals and Incidentals: $325-485
  • Students should anticipate spending this estimated amount during the program for meals and incidentals.

    If necessary, students may incur additional fees for visa costs and travel to consulates or embassies to obtain the visa. If you have questions about costs you may incur while participating in this program, please ask your GEO advisor.

GEO offers scholarships and grants for students studying abroad on Dialogue of Civilizations programs. Please visit our Scholarships page for more info!

Destination

Ghana, a nation on West Africa’s Gulf of Guinea, is known for diverse wildlife, old forts and secluded beaches, such as at Busua. Coastal towns Elmina and Cape Coast contain posubans (native shrines), colonial buildings and castles-turned-museums that serve as testimonials to the slave trade. North of Cape Coast, vast Kakum National Park has a treetop-canopy walkway over the rain forest.

The U.S. State Department lists travel advisories, local laws, alerts from the embassy, and other important information about Ghana here. Please review this information before applying.

Accommodations

  • University Housing: Faculty, staff, and students will reside at university guesthouses (University of Ghana, Cape Coast University, Engineering Guest House of Kwame Nkrumah University). These guesthouses provide double rooms, refrigerators, air conditioning, laundry services (for a fee), breakfast, meeting areas, and a daily change of bedding. To the best of their abilities, these guesthouses provide WiFi.
  • Hotel: We will stay in the Windy Lodge located near the University of Education – Winneba. This is located in Winneba, Ghana. It is a quaint hotel.

Host University or Organization

This Dialogue has an in-country coordinator who travels with participants. In-Country Coordinator: Edward Mudashiru. Edward also has one assistant that accompanies participants to all programs, lectures, and services. There are also in-city coordinators for each city that we reside during the trip. These coordinators also accompany participants to activities in their particular cities. These coordinators serve to help persons on the Dialogue navigate the cultural norms of Ghana, identity and utilize any necessary services such as purchasing food, etc. They also help to resolve any unexpected needs of Dialogue participants. Faculty, staff and students travel in a bus throughout the Dialogue so no other forms of transportation are needed. The bus provides water and other amenities.

Faculty Advisor
Advisors