Looking to have a global experience that challenges your thinking and takes you to new places? Look no further than GEO’s 2020 Virtual Dialogue of Civilizations! Choose from any of the following intensive 4-5 week courses in order to fulfill your degree requirements and have an immersive digital experience. These aren’t your average summer courses. Explore global ideas and systems, engage with cross-cultural perspectives, and investigate how diverse communities are tackling timely issues. Cultivate your global mindset this summer with Dialogue of Civilizations faculty and the Global Experience Office. 

To register for these classes:

  • Search MyNortheastern or the Course Scheduler by CRN, title, or “Faculty-Led Study Abroad”
  • Register for the course(s)
  • Some 2-Course Dialogues are intended to be taken together and/or require instructor permission

Space is limited! Register now to secure your spot.

Withdrawing:

If you would like to withdraw from a Virtual Dialogue of Civilizations course, you must fill out the Withdrawal Form linked here, in addition to withdrawing in banner.

DOC II 2020 Withdrawal Dates

College of Arts, Media and Design

Design in the Wilds (June 29 – August 3)

Design Process Context and Systems Abroad : Explores common design practices, principles, and vocabularies, introducing the design process as a method of inquiry and problem solving through in the field activities with an emphasis on outdoor products and experiences. Emphasizes the importance of an awareness of audience and context in the creation of meaningful communications and experiences. Explores the practice of design as an iterative process, offering students an opportunity to obtain an understanding of the value of systems thinking and the importance of feedback and exchange as a means for assessing the quality of design’s effectiveness in helping users achieve their goals. In a digital format this course focuses on a series of design activities that teach heuristics and tools and design reflection.

Experience Design 1 Abroad : Investigates a wide range of design research methods and means of representing user intentions and actions in order to develop coherent designs based on the needs of the user. Includes use of context assessment, user experience audits, and scenario development as a means to understand the motivations, behaviors, and values of audiences and participants. The ideation, prototyping, and iteration of an outdoor product or experience is the locus of this course.

College of Engineering

Sustainable Urban Transportation (July 7 – August 14)

Design for Sustainable Transportation: Netherlands: Examines how the design of Dutch transportation infrastructure promotes travel by foot, bicycle, and public transportation as opposed to private automobile and how it promotes urban livability and traffic safety. Topics include bicycling infrastructure planning and design; Vision Zero traffic safety principles and design treatments for safe roads, intersections, and crossings; and high-quality transit service planning and design. Through design projects, offers students an opportunity to apply lessons learned to the U.S. context.

Planning and Policy for Sustainable Urban Transportation: Netherlands: Examines urban transportation planning practices and policies in the Netherlands that promote travel by bicycling, public transportation, and foot and help prevent urban mobility from degrading urban livability. Topics include land-use planning at the site, neighborhood, and regional scale; transit- and bicycle-oriented development, including both land-use and transportation infrastructure planning and policies for large-scale urban expansions; and traffic-circulation planning and policies to promote safety, prevent roads from becoming barriers to walking, cycling, or transit, and to create car-free and car-lite zones.

College of Science

Personality and Abnormal Psych: The Intersection of Science and Culture (June 29 – August 5)

Abnormal Psychology Syllabus vDOC 2020

Personality Syllabus Summer 2 2020 vDOC

College of Social Sciences and Humanities 

The Mathematical Heritage of Hungary (June 29 – July 31)

Unity and Diversity – Politics and Migration in the Netherlands (July 1 – August 14)

Syllabus

This program introduces provides students with an in-depth and experiential introduction to comparative local and national politics focusing on the development of politics in the Netherlands and in the city of Rotterdam in an increasingly globalized era. One course (POLS 4937) examines the political institutions and developments that have led to the current Dutch model of democracy and the rise of Rotterdam as a global city, and offers a look at local and everyday politics in another democratic system. The other course (POLS 4938) focuses on immigration, looking at how recent waves of migration came about and examining the political and social questions raised by significant demographic change, in the context of a relatively wealthy and open society.

Students will have a chance to have direct virtual meetings with politicians and civil society organizations in the city of Rotterdam, as well as with counterparts in the cities of Amsterdam and Boston and in the Dutch national government. There will also be guest lectures and conversations with political scientists and sociologists working to understand how cities integrate and adapt to increasingly diverse populations. The program overall will give students an in-depth, experiential introduction to how policy and politics are conducted in the Netherlands, focused on one of the most salient issues facing the Netherlands (and many other countries) today.

City Politics and National Politics in The Netherlands : (Understanding Societies and Institutions (SI) and Integrating Knowledge and Skills Through Experience (EX) NUPath) This course examines the political institutions and developments that have led to the current Dutch model of democracy and the rise of Rotterdam as a global city. It focuses on the formal and informal structures of Dutch politics, and it will introduce students to the most important issues in the country’s political and policy debates today. The course also takes a historical look at the political and economic rebuilding of the Netherlands after World War II and up through the present day, focusing particularly on the city of Rotterdam. Students will also spend time examining how local institutions in Rotterdam and its neighborhoods mediate responses to national and global phenomena. Through virtual meetings with politicians, community activists, and civil servants in Rotterdam and on the national stage, students will also learn the particulars of Dutch politics at multiple levels of government, and think about how local institutions mediate the response to global phenomena like migration.

Migration and Diversity in the Netherlands : (Understanding Societies and Institutions (SI) and Integrating Knowledge and Skills Through Experience (EX) NUPath) This course will look at how immigration has affected Dutch society and will focus on the political and social developments that may follow from demographic changes in the context of a relatively wealthy and open society. A large number of immigrants came to the Netherlands following the end of the Dutch Empire (from former colonies such as Suriname and Indonesia), as did many from other countries (such as Turkey and Morocco) in response to labor shortages in the mid-to-late 20th century. Today, a large percentage of Dutch residents and citizens are either immigrants or the descendants of immigrants, and questions of migration and integration have been central to many political debates in the last two decades. Students will learn more about the everyday experience of first- or second-generation immigrants in the Netherlands, the ways in which the Dutch state has responded to questions around migration and integration, and the different understandings that exist today of what it means to be “Dutch.”

Balkan Puzzles: Democracy vs. Authoritarianism & International Meddling( June 29 – July 31)

his course is an interdisciplinary Balkans (Southeast Europe) Studies course. Starting with the “shot heard around the world” – the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand in Sarajevo in 1914, marking the start of World War One – the course tracks the collapse of the Ottoman, Austro-Hungarian, and Russian Empires and the rise of Yugoslavia (first as a Kingdom and later as a Socialist Federal Republic).  With these as a foundation, this course focuses primarily on the collapse of Yugoslavia and the 1990s ethno-religious wars that continue to define current political, social, and economic issues,  and which partly inspired Samuel Huntington’s (in)famous article “The Clash of Civilizations”. Course discussions build off of numerous online guest lectures by war veterans, politicians, activists and religious leaders of all ethnicities and religions (Serbs, Croats, Bosnian Muslims, Kosovar Albanians, among others), and representatives from the EU, UN and others. Assignments draw upon personal narratives, films, documentaries, podcasts, and other online resources.

The Virtual Balkans Dialogue will investigate conflict and post-conflict reconstruction in this geopolitically sensitive region of Southeastern Europe, focusing on the former Yugoslavia (principally Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia, and Kosovo). We examine the Balkans conflicts: the formation and then the break-up of Yugoslavia, its civil wars, American-led efforts to end the bloody conflict in Bosnia (1995), and the U.S. and NATO military strikes against Serbia (1999). We examine the effects of war crimes trials on both regional reconciliation and international politics, such as the Balkan origins of white supremacists’ Islamophobic terrorism and their “Kosovo-Crimea-Palestine” comparisons. Expanding from regional into international politics, we examine the increasing global interest in the Balkans, not only from the European Union and NATO, but also from Russia, China, Arab States, Iran, Israel, and Turkey. This “interest” is measured by large-scale economic investments, diplomatic initiatives, military partnerships, “soft power” projects (universities, cultural centers, and others) and strategic dimension of Coronavirus-related international assistance.

Disasters and Recovery: COVID-19 (June 29 – July 27)

Syllabus

This program, “Disasters and Recovery: COVID19,” is a short-term, faculty-led academic program based in the College of Social Sciences and Humanities and supported by the Global Experience Office at Northeastern University. Students will learn about the conditions which lead to disasters and the factors which accelerate or retard processes of recovery and develop the skills to analyze these conditions and make recommendations to policy makers. Participants will focus on the dynamics of several major disasters and crises including the ongoing COVID19 pandemic and the 1918 flu which may have killed 70 million people worldwide. Along with 1918 flu and the COVID19 pandemic, participants will study rehabilitation and revitalization after the 1923 Tokyo, the 1995 Kobe earthquake, and the 11 March 2011 triple disasters in Japan: earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown. Students will develop their knowledge of crisis and disaster recovery through books, articles, movies, and audio clips. Further, over the month long dialogue students will look at qualitative and quantitative data from multiple levels of analysis (individual, city, and national), learn how to visualize these data, and then develop short policy memos for local, regional, and national decision makers.

Students will learn about the conditions which lead to disasters and the factors which accelerate or retard processes of recovery and develop the skills to analyze these conditions and make recommendations to policy makers. Participants will focus on the dynamics of several major disasters and crises including the ongoing COVID19 pandemic and the 1918 flu which may have killed 70 million people worldwide. Along with 1918 flu and the COVID19 pandemic, participants will study rehabilitation and revitalization after the 1923 Tokyo, the 1995 Kobe earthquake, and the 11 March 2011 triple disasters in Japan: earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown. Students will develop their knowledge of crisis and disaster recovery through books, articles, movies, and audio clips. Further, over the month long dialogue students will look at qualitative and quantitative data from multiple levels of analysis, learn how to visualize these data, and then develop short policy memos for local, regional, and national decision makers. Co-requisite: POLS 4938

Students will learn about the international conditions which lead to disasters and the factors which accelerate or retard processes of recovery and develop the skills to analyze these conditions and make recommendations to policy makers. Participants will focus on the dynamics of several major disasters and crises including the ongoing COVID19 pandemic and the 1918 flu which may have killed 70 million people worldwide. Focusing especially on the national and international levels, students will develop their knowledge of crisis and disaster recovery through books, articles, movies, and audio clips. Further, over the month long dialogue students will look at qualitative and quantitative data from multiple levels of analysis (individual, city, and national), learn how to visualize these data, and then develop short policy memos for local, regional, and national decision makers.

D’Amore McKim School of Business

Social Entrepreneurship and Micro-Enterprise Consulting in South Africa (July 7 – August 10)

Honors

Happiness and Sustainability in the Nordics (July 20 – August 14)

Happiness in the Nordics : Introduces students to the science of happiness, focusing on the intersection between economics, psychology, and public policy. Through experiential learning and reflection, students gain the necessary tools for developing sustainable happiness and increased life satisfaction, as well as enhancing their effectiveness in various professional contexts. Focuses on the Nordic countries.

Sustainability in the Nordics : Introduces students to the divergent goals and complex processes associated with sustainable development from a European perspective. Specific focus is given to the interplay between social, political, and economic issues and environmental concerns. Explores the interaction of global sustainability and human psychology, examining how the environment influences cognition, behavior, and emotional well-being. Focuses on the Nordic countries.

College of Arts, Media and Design

Peru Y La Fotografía (July 6 – August 7)

College of Social Sciences and Humanities 

Global Refugee Crisis: Rome and Palermo

Recently, we have observed that displaced people have turned into bargaining chips by states, including Western democracies, that prioritize border politics and securitization in their power politics. One of the main ironies of our times is that we are feeling less safe and more fearful in a world that is increasingly securitized. In the aftermath of the break of Syrian civil war, Europe fell into a major “security crisis” owing to the first mass influx of refugees from outside of Europe in history. Against the backdrop of tightened border control and rise of anti-immigrant regimes in Europe since 2016, this seminar demonstrates how cities of refuge take on innovative socio-spatial roles and political agency. In the context of massive refugee flow, we will explore the ways in which cities of refuge, such as Athens and Palermo, shape the perception and experience of safety and fear. As these cities resist to and negotiate with anti-immigration policies and securitization in Europe, they carve out safe places and generate urban practices of inclusion and protection. Unlike “secured” places detectable by the politics of fear and exclusion, safe places in this project are distinguished by inclusion and protection. Unsurprisingly, the safety of the most vulnerable category of our times, Muslim refugees and asylum seekers, falls to the center of analysis in the post 9-11 context of rising Islamophobia. The broader implication of this seminar is to question the interplay between security states and the cities that receive and accommodate large numbers of refugees. We will explore how security states and cities of refuge are the two sides of the same coin. Together, they constitute the Zeitgeist: While security states and their harsher border control generate the politics of fear and exclusion, cities of refuge are increasingly charged with creating safe havens of inclusion for vulnerable refugee populations.

Khoury College of Computer Sciences

Software Development Practices in Germany (June 29 – July 31)

Software Project Management :Covers both technical and managerial aspects of software and data project management, which is critical to the success of software and data science projects. Emphasizes the differences between traditional software life-cycle models and modern iterative and agile practices. Includes project manager responsibilities, stakeholder management, staffing, resource allocation, estimation, activity scheduling, budget control, quality management, risk assessment, communication, scope control, and project metrics. Introduces standard project management tools combined with control mechanisms including PERT, burndown, and Gantt charts. Examines these methods in the context of standard frameworks, including the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK), applicable IEEE Standards, ISO 9001, CMMI, Unified Process, Scrum, and Kanban-driven continuous delivery models. Compares project management practices in US versus Germany. Includes guest workshops, case studies, lectures, and virtual company visits from German practitioners and academics.