Staff and Students

Ieke de Vries

Graduate Research Assistant

i.devries@northeastern.edu

Ieke de Vries is a doctoral student at the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University. Since joining the Ph.D. program in September 2015, Ieke has been engaged with various projects at the Institute of Race and Justice and in particular the development of a database for monitoring and responding to the needs of youths at risk for commercial sexual exploitation and labor exploitation (in close cooperation with the CAC Suffolk). Her own research focuses on labor trafficking, victimization experiences and the role of the private sector in human trafficking practices. She received the Summer Research Fellowship of the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice to investigate the private sector engagement with labor trafficking practices. Before coming to Northeastern, Ieke worked for three years at the Dutch Rapporteur of Trafficking in Human Beings and Sexual Violence against Children in The Hague (The Netherlands). She holds a degree in Cultural Anthropology and Development Studies (BSc, Radboud University) as well as Conflict Studies and Human Rights (MA, Utrecht University). She studied and worked on issues around security and crime in different countries, including the U.S., The Netherlands, Chile and Jordan. 

Candence Wills

Graduate Research Assistant

c.wills@northeastern.edu

Candence D. Wills is a second year doctoral student in the Criminology and Criminal Justice program at Northeastern University. She is currently working with a multidisciplinary team (MDT) created by members of agencies that interact with commercially and sexually exploited children (CSEC) to analyze child CSEC data from four counties in Massachusetts. There are several components to the research project including administering training surveys to participants in child trafficking awareness workshops, interviewing MDT members, transcribing and interviews, and utilizing Tableau software to create visuals of county data on exploited children in an effort to influence policies regarding CSEC victims. Prior to attending Northeastern University, Ms. Wills completed both her Bachelors of Arts in Communications: Rhetoric and Masters in International Development in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh. She served as a member on several research teams including ORA-CASOS Terrorism Social Network Analysis, Ford Institute for Human Security (FIHS) Human Trafficking Working Group, United Nations Gender Equality in Public Administration, and two projects associated with U.S. State Department Diplomacy Lab: FIHS Countering Violent Extremism Working Group and a comparative analysis of state failure among Libya, Somalia, and Syria. During her time at Pitt, Candence enjoyed working as the Executive Assistant to the Vice Provost of Enrollment.

Jesenia Robles

Graduate Research Assistant

robles.je@husky.neu.edu

Jesenia Robles is a former McNair Scholar who began her graduate studies at Northeastern in the Fall of 2017. She was previously a teaching assistant for Dr. Martinez’s Race, Crime and Justice course. She began working with the IRJ in January of 2018. She comes with a Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice and a minor in Sociology from Boise State University in Boise, ID. Her research interests pertain to the relationship between marginalized communities and the criminal justice system. Her prior research has explored the perceptions of police officers held by the Muslim community. Jese is currently working under Dr. Farrell and Dr. Cuevas on the Latino Biased Victimization Grant designed to study the victimization experiences of Latinos as consequence of their ethnic identity and perceived immigration status.

Sarah Lockwood

Graduate Research Assistant

lockwood.s@husky.neu.edu

Sarah Lockwood is currently a first-year Doctoral student at Northeastern University. She holds a B.A in Psychology and B.S in Criminology from the University of South Florida, and received her Master’s degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from Northeastern. Her current research focuses on institutional responses to human trafficking, but her main interests focus on human trafficking and victimization of underserved populations more generally. While working as a graduate researcher in the Institute on Race and Justice, she has collaborated on the My Life My Choice program evaluation study, the Capturing Human Trafficking Victimization through Crime Reporting grant, and most recently the Latino Bias Victimization grant. Through the institute, she has also become a research consultant for the Children’s Advocacy Center of Suffolk County, researching residential placement options for commercially exploited or trafficked youth. While at the IRJ, she has also served as the Violence and Justice Research Lab coordinator.

Kelly Goggins

Graduate Research Assistant

goggin.k@husky.neu.edu

Kelly Goggin is pursuing a Master of Science degree in the Criminology and Criminal Justice Program at Northeastern University. She graduated from Iowa State University with a Bachelor of Science in Psychology in May 2016. As an undergraduate, she worked as a research assistant in Jason C.K. Chan’s Memory, Law, and Education lab. Here, she studied how taking memory tests affects subsequent memory performance and how misleading information affects eyewitness memory accuracy. Kelly joined the Violence and Justice Research Lab in September 2016, and is currently examining the risk factors that leave youth susceptible to human trafficking. Her research interests include youth victimization and delinquency and juvenile justice.

Matthew Kafafian

Graduate Research Assistant

kafafian.m@husky.neu.edu

Matthew Kafafian is a first year doctoral student at Northeastern University. He received his Bachelors of Arts at West Virginia University in Criminology with a minor in Political Science and his Master's in Criminology and Criminal Justice from Northeastern University. While at West Virginia University, Matthew served as the president of the Sociology Anthropology Criminology Association and was one of the lead interns at the Research Center on Violence. Matthew’s interest in research started after he got involved with the Research Center on Violence under the leadership Walter Dekeseredy. Currently, Matthew is working on his Masters in Criminology and Criminal Justice. His research interests include global criminology and human rights. Matthew got involved with the research center in Fall of 2016 and is currently working on the Child Welfare Trafficking Grant where he is involved with policy landscape portion of the research.

Stephen Abeyta

Graduate Research Assistant

abeyta.s@husky.neu.edu

Stephen Abeyta is a first year Doctoral Student at Northeastern University in the school of Criminology and Criminal Justice. He holds a B.A. in sociology, graduating Magna Cum Laude, from the University of Colorado Boulder. Previously, he was involved in a qualitative research project where he had the opportunity to interview several survivors of sexual exploitation. He has also been a Research Assistant for Dr. Joanne Belknap, coding police cases on intimate partner abuse. He is currently a Research Assistant for Dr. Amy Farrell working in the IRJ and is investigating labor trafficking among potentially vulnerable in an exploratory project. His research interests include human trafficking and victimization, specifically the long-term recovery of survivors, as well as the death penalty and the public perception surrounding state sponsored execution.

Brianne Kane

Graduate Research Assistant

kane.br@husky.neu.edu

Brianne Kane is a doctoral student in the School of Criminology and Justice Policy at Northeastern University. She received her M.A. in Criminal Justice and Criminology at Sam Houston State University and her B.A. in Psychology and Crime, Law and Justice from the University of Connecticut. Prior to joining the Violence and Justice Research Lab, Brianne was engaged in research that focused on mental health issues within correctional populations. Brianne’s research interests focus on human trafficking and she is currently working as a research assistant on the UCR for human trafficking cases project.

Keller Sheppard

Graduate Research Assistant

sheppard.k@husky.neu.edu

Keller Sheppard is a doctoral student from Atlanta, GA. After receiving his bachelors in Sociology and Criminal Justice from The University of Georgia, he worked as a grant manager for The Georgia Governor’s Office of Highway Safety. In this role, he oversaw the state’s Highway Enforcement of Aggressive Traffic (H.E.A.T.) program and two law enforcement training grants focused on speeding and advanced DUI/DWI enforcement. Since enrollment at Northeastern, he has been working with Anthony Braga, Jack McDevitt, and Greg Zimmerman on several projects including a RCT experiment looking at the Boston Police Department’s Body-Worn Camera implementation and a police legitimacy implementation with the Cambridge police department. His research interests include police discretion and the influences of ecological context on policing tactics.

Stephen Douglas

Graduate Research Assistant

douglas.st@husky.neu.edu

Stephen Douglas became a doctoral student at the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University in September 2017. Stephen earned his Bachelor’s degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Ulster in Northern Ireland, and was a police officer in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, prior to enrolling at Northeastern. His experience as a police officer has fed into his research interests, primarily focusing upon strategies of policing, police victimization, and use of force by officers. At the moment, he is working with Dr. Braga, Dr. McDevitt, and Dr. Zimmerman on projects examining the use of procedural justice by police officers, and the effects of body cameras worn by officers in the BPD.

Megan Jose

Undergraduate Research Assistant

jose.m@husky.neu.edu

Megan Jose is a fourth-year undergraduate student at Northeastern, pursuing a B.S. in Criminal Justice, and minors in International Affairs and Psychology. Megan joined the lab in May 2017 as a fellow working on a research paper measuring public opinion of private sector responses to labor exploitation. Working now as a Research Assistant, she is involved in research surrounding Commercial Sexual Exploitation of children. She has completed a co-op at a law firm, and is currently co-oping at the International Institute of New England, working with the resettlement of refugees. Megan's interests include victimization, advocacy, and human rights, and hopes to pursue a career in the advocacy of under-served populations.

Julie van Westendorp

Undergraduate Research Assistant

vanwestendorp.j@husky.neu.edu

Julie van Westendorp is a fifth-year undergraduate student majoring in Criminal Justice and Psychology. Julie joined the lab in May 2017 as a Summer Research Fellow for the DAVILA study and now works as a Research Assistant under Carlos Cuevas assisting on several projects. Julie has completed two co-ops: she was an Associate Investigator at the MA Attorney General’s Office’s Investigations Division, and a Junior Paralegal at the Intellectual Property Litigation department at Foley Hoag, LLP. After graduating from Northeastern, Julie hopes to attend law school in Boston to pursue a career in criminal law.

Luzmila Moreno

Graduate Research Assistant

Luzmila Moreno is a second year grad student in the Counseling Psychology program with a concentration in Forensic Counseling. Luzmila is originally from Texas and holds a BS in Criminal Justice and a BA in Political Science and Spanish from Midwestern State University. Luzmila volunteers on the project because she is interested in doing research within the Latino community. Luzmila is a Bilingual Dual Diagnosis Clinical Intern at Casa Esperanza in Roxbury and has enjoyed doing individual and group therapy with Latino based clients. Luzmila is also a Mental Health Associate at an inpatient psychiatric hospital in Jamaica Plain. Her future endeavors include merging her interests in Criminal Justice, Psychology and Political Science.

Nicholas Johnson

Graduate Research Assistant

johnson.n@husky.neu.edu

Nicholas Johnson (He, His, And Him) was born and raised in Philadelphia PA, with roots in the Caribbean and the Deep South. His experiences with inequality in the city in conjunction with the wisdom of his community instilled a spirit of service in pursuit of equity and inclusion. He works in multicultural leadership development and is invested in marginalized groups in developing means of self-determination. He has a background community organizing and how it correlates with building social and political capital and has research interest in the intersection of Race, Globalization, and Human Rights. He earned his undergraduate from Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania where he majored in International Studies & Human Communications with a minor in Ethnic Studies, and he is now pursuing his master’s degree in Global Studies & International Relations from Northeastern University. He is also the co-founder of Culturally Rooted Reformations LLC and serves as a Graduate Assistant in the Social Justice Resource Center.

Niharika Sane

Graduate Research Assistant

sane.n@husky.neu.edu

Niharika Sane is a first year graduate student pursuing her Masters degree in Health Informatics. She graduated with a BS-MS dual degree in Biology from IISER Pune in May 2015. She comes with 2 years of research experience, working with animals models to test the efficacy of a drug and with human subjects studying metabolic effects of passive smoking. She also has 1.5 years of experience as a variant analyst in PierianDx. Her previous projects involve topics like cancer genomics, personalized medicine, therapeutic interventions and data analysis. She has been awarded multiple scholarships during her education and research tenure. She is currently working with a multidisciplinary team (MDT) that interact with commercially and sexually exploited children (CSEC) to analyze child CSEC data from four counties in Massachusetts utilizing Tableau software.

Carlande Nicolas

Graduate Research Assistant

nicolas.c@husky.neu.edu

Carlande Nicolas is a first year graduate student pursuing her Masters of Science in Criminology and Criminal Justice. She is a first generation Haitian-American, who was born in the Bronx. Carlande went to boarding school at The Taft School in Connecticut and graduated from Boston College with a BA in Linguistics. Her interests lie in human trafficking (especially the commercial sexual exploitation of children), race and crime, and criminal justice policy. Prior to the Violence and Justice Research Lab, Carlande worked at the United Nations Headquarters in New York. She has also done research on Somali Bantu and Bhutanese child refugees at the Boston College Research Program on Child and Adversity. Carlande is currently working on a government-funded project with Professor Amy Farrell on a statewide analysis of child sex trafficking in Massachusetts.