News

The unaffordable Health Care Act, or why queer people need health insurance

In thinking about what to write for this week, I originally thought I would discuss religious exemptions and the broad license certain states are granting their citizens to discriminate. Instead, I’m going to write about health care. There are many things that can be said about the Senate’s recently released draft of the AHCA. It’s…
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Published On: June 26, 2017 |
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Commoning the smart city

  New technologies allow citizens to take up new roles in helping to develop and manage urban infrastructures, such as energy, waste and mobility systems. But what are the snags? On May 24, assistant professor Dietmar Offenhuber, a digital urban planner, examined what digital platforms can do and how municipalities can position themselves at A…
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Published On: June 22, 2017 |
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Welcome to Chronicles of a Nonprofit Intern

As a student, I have investigated the formation of social policy and applied a mixed-methods approach in evaluating the prevalence of unequal conditions around us. Now, I am taking that interest a step further by interning at Emerge Massachusetts, a nonprofit organization that aims to identify, train, and inspire democratic women to pursue public office….
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Students study, meet U.S. Supreme Court justices

Northeastern students meet U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer. Courtesy photo   Surreal. Surprising. Impressive. Those are some of the words professor Dan Urman’s students used to describe their recent field trip to the Harvard Marshall Forum, where they met current U.S. Supreme Court Justices Stephen Breyer and Neil Gorsuch. “It was an honor to…
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Published On: June 21, 2017 |
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The Golden Stairs

In lieu of traditional lecture, on Tuesday, our class toured through the immigration history of East Boston. Walking through the streets of East Boston, looking out over the piers and docks to the gleaming skyline in the background, we literally traced the steps generations of immigrants have taken into our nation. Called the Ellis Island…
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Published On: June 20, 2017 |
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Pride

This week, as Pride Month begins winding down, I want to talk about Pride. Specifically, I want to talk about the origins of Pride and how they do (or rather, don’t) relate to current trends within LGBT policy and the LGBTQ community as a whole. Pride Marches today are theoretically meant to be celebrations of…
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On rights

Over the past few years, I’ve thought a lot about three things: access, equality, and rights. It isn’t until this year, however, that I began to look more deeply at these three concepts as a single unit. So, what is a right? Merriam-Webster defines it as: “something to which one has a just claim…the power or…
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Published On: June 14, 2017 |
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A nation of immigrants, laws, and contradictions

This week, we focused on past reforms to the immigration system – from a 1965 reform led by Senator Ted Kennedy (MA-D) to the 1995 “tough on crime” Democrats to the 2007 Gang of Eight failures – and the potential future of the immigration system. Here, I will give a brief tour through the history…
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Published On: June 13, 2017 |
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The faces behind the zeroes

The deluge of immigration news continues. Scheduled to examine the economics of immigration, class this week took on a different life as the news and personal accounts overshadowed our discussion. Ironically, in an attempt to hold an objective discussion about the economic impact of immigrants, our class instead focused on the poignancy beyond the numbers….
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Published On: June 6, 2017 |
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Setting the stage

When I was growing up, I wanted to be a lawyer. Of course, like most kids, I also wanted to be a veterinarian, a doctor, an astronaut, and an opera singer. Years later, I have a degree in voice performance and have performed in multiple operas…I’m also, somewhat ironically, in law school. It’s funny how…
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Published On: June 5, 2017 |
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