Welcome to the International Affairs Program

A message from the Director

The International Affairs Program at Northeastern University brings faculty and students together in courses and research projects that fundamentally strive to create a better world—one that is freer, more peaceful, more humane, more just, and more inclusive.  We are a supportive community, where undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and administrative staff collaborate in an intellectually engaging and friendly environment. We are strongly committed to experiential education (a cornerstone mission of Northeastern University), and the IAF has pioneered the university’s Dialogues of Civilizations program, which now take place in more than 70 countries around the world.  Our internationally diverse faculty (hailing from Brazil, Columbia, the UK, to Turkey, Egypt and Tunisia to name just a few countries) has a wide-ranging scholarly expertise, with particular strengths in conflict resolution and peace-building, international law, and the global politics of gender, ethnicity, cities and religion.

 

Berna Turam

Director of International Affairs Program
Professor of Sociology and Anthropology

To read the full Message from the Director, please click here.

Research-active Faculty from Across the Globe

From women’s education, labor, and feminist movements; to transnational mobilities and contested urban spaces; to democratization and demographic changes in the Middle East, North Africa, and the Mediterranean; and to international law and policy the International Affairs faculty engage in a variety of research projects spanning the globe. To read about the research activities and expertise of our faculty members, please select from the buttons below.

Learn about our faculty research

United Nations Dialogue in Geneva

Example of Dialogue opportunities

The United Nations Dialogue in Geneva is titled Global Governance of International Security & the World Politics of Diplomacy. It started in 2007 by Professor Denise Garcia with the aim of exposing students to the practice and real life of diplomacy and negotiation of key world politics issues at the highest level that occur in the city of Geneva, capital of humanitarian diplomacy.

For more information click here

 

 

International Careers

Careers on the International Stage

What can a International Affairs major provide for you?  There are several options for careers on the international stage in several areas.  View resource tools, websites, job platforms, information about professional paths found in Professor Denise Garcia’s new stellar presentation

 

Featured Event from 2017

04/05/2017

Women’s Empowerment is Smart Economics

Professor Yana Rodgers will discuss women’s empowerment in the labor market using a global perspective, with a focus on successful strategies for empowering women in the labor market and what the benefits are not just to women but to economies as a whole…
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Educating Global Leaders for the 21st Century

International affairs at Northeastern University challenges students to engage across intellectual and geographic boundaries, while also asking them to think and act “locally” through academic coursework, experiential opportunities, and language proficiency. Read more about our mission>>

Learn About Our Undergraduate Program

Research Reports

The Precariat: A New Dangerous Class

Guy Standing, author of The Precariat: The New Dangerous Class, and A Precariat Charter, spoke about his new work to an overflow group of students and faculty in the Raytheon Amphitheater on February 22nd, 2016.

Standing defines the precariat as an emerging class of people facing lives of economic insecurity, moving in and out of jobs that give little meaning to their lives. As such, they develop emotions of anomie, anxiety, alienation, and anger. The precariat is a “dangerous class” because it is internally divided, including college graduates without career prospects, adjuncts and other involuntary part-time workers, migrants and other vulnerable groups that tend to be vilified, as well as what Standing called “atavists” and “nostalgics”. Lacking agency, its members may be susceptible to the calls of political extremism.

To read a full report on the event, please click here.