Undergraduate Course Offerings – FALL 2017

Fall 2017

1000 Level Courses

HIST 1130 - Introduction to the History of the United States

Title: HIST 1130 – Introduction to the History of the United States

Instructor: Benjamin Schmidt

CRN: 10734

Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Description: Engages with the major issues in U.S. history. Topics include the interaction of native populations with European settlers, the American Revolution and the Constitution, slavery, the Civil War, industrialization and migration, the growth of government and rise of the welfare state, media and mass culture, struggles for civil rights and liberation, and America’s role in the world from independence to the Iraq wars. 

HIST 1150 - East Asian Studies

Title: HIST 1150 – East Asian Studies

Instructors: Philip Thai & Tom Havens

CRN: 414972 (Thai) & 16144 (Havens)

Sequence: 

Thai – 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Havens – 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Description: Seeks to provide an understanding of the constituent characteristics that originally linked East Asia as a region and the nature of the transformations that have occurred in the region over the last two thousand years. Concentrates on China and Japan, and addresses Korea and Vietnam where possible. Also seeks to provide students with effective interdisciplinary analytical skills as well as historical, ethical, cultural diversity, and aesthetic perspectives. Cross-listed with ASNS 1150. 

 

HIST 1170 - Europe: Empires, Revolutions, Wars, and Their Aftermath

Title: HIST 1170 – Europe: Empires, Revolutions, Wars, and Their Aftermath

Instructor: Laura Frader

CRN: 15697

Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Description: Examines major themes in the history of Europe from 1500 to the present, emphasizing the conceptual tools historians use to think about European history, and drawing on historical documents, literature, and film. Examines the emergence of states and nations as theoretical constructs and political realities; men’s and women’s experience of social conflict-rebellions, revolutions, and wars-and the complex relationships between Europeans and non-Europeans. Attention is given to how race, class, and gender shaped the way people made and understood their history. 

HIST 1180 - African History

Title: HIST 1180 – African History

Instructor: Katherine Luongo

CRN: 17662

Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Description: Explores the history of the African continent from 1000 C.E. to the present era. Topics include medieval kingdoms (Ghana, Mali, Songhai, Zimbabwe, the city-states of East Africa, and the Kongo kingdom); slave trades (Indian Ocean, trans-Saharan, and transatlantic); the partition of Africa and European colonization; and the decolonization process. Emphasizes the interactions of African peoples with the rest of the world, particularly the relations between Africa and Europe after 1500 C.E. 

HIST 1185 - Introduction to Middle Eastern History

Title: HIST 1185 – Introduction to Middle Eastern History

Instructor: Ilham Khuri-Makdisi

CRN: 14964

Sequence: D (9:50 AM – 11:30 AM TF)

Description: Relies on historical and literary sources, as well as such other cultural artifacts as architecture and photography, and focuses on interaction and changing relations and perceptions between Europe and the Middle East. Surveys the major political and economic events that have linked the trajectory of both civilizations, as well as broad patterns of human activity, such as migrations, conversions, and, cultural exchange. Emphasizes the commonality of encounters, and analyzes the construction of an “other” and its enduring legacy in modern times. 

HIST 1200/1201 - First Year Research Seminar

Title: HIST 1200/1201 – First Year Research Seminar

Instructors: Cameron Blevins & Victoria Cain

CRN: 14513/13735 (Blevins) & 12638/14514 (Cain)

Sequence: 

Blevins – B (2:50 PM – 4:30 PM MW) 

Cain – D (9:50 AM – 11:30 AM TF)

Description: Provides an introduction to historical methods, research, writing, and argument in which all students produce a substantial research project that passes through at least two revisions, and that is presented publicly to other members of the colloquium

HIST 1218 - Pirates, Planters, and Patriots: Making the Americas, 1492 - 1804

Title: HIST 1218 – Pirates, Planters, and Patriots: Making the Americas, 1492 – 1804

Instructor: Chris Parsons

CRN: 14967

Sequence: 2 (9:15 AM – 10:20 AM MWR)

Description: Seeks to challenge students to understand more than the outlines of American history—Pilgrims, patriots, plantations— in the broader contexts of events that unfolded in and around the Atlantic Ocean in the Americas, Europe, and Africa. Covers Columbus’s first landing in the Caribbean to the Haitian declaration of independence in 1804 and includes the Atlantic trade, piracy, slavery and other forms of labor, cultural and ecological exchange, and independence and emancipation.

HIST 1225 - Gender, Race, and Medicine

Title: HIST 1225 – Gender, Race, and Medicine

Instructor: Moya Bailey

CRN: 16351

Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Description: Examines the basic tenets of “scientific objectivity” and foundational scientific ideas about race, sex, and gender and what these have meant for marginalized groups in society, particularly when they seek medical care. Introduces feminist science theories ranging from linguistic metaphors of the immune system, to the medicalization of race, to critiques of the sexual binary. Emphasizes contemporary as well as historical moments to trace the evolution of “scientific truth” and its impact on the U.S. cultural landscape. Offers students an opportunity to develop the skills to critically question what they “know” about science and the scientific process and revisit their disciplinary training as a site for critical analysis.

HIST 1270 - Ancient Greece

Title: HIST 1270 – Ancient Greece

Instructor: Edward Gutiérrez

CRN: 12986

Sequence: E (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM WF)

Description: Studies the Greek achievement from proto-Indo-European migrations through the Minoan and Mycenaean bronze age, to the evolution of Homeric and Hellenic societies in the iron age, to the rise of the city-states and the age of Alexander. Topics include the coexistence of the rational and the irrational; the paradox of ethical philosophies and exclusionary political systems; the tensions between particularism and cultural unity; and gender ideology and what has been termed “the reign of the phallus.” 

HIST 1272 - Europe in the Middle Ages, 500 - 1500

Title: HIST 1272 – Europe in the Middle Ages, 500 – 1500

Instructor: Robert Cross

CRN: 18164

Sequence: E (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM WF)

Description: Examines the history of medieval Europe in a period of tremendous fluidity, migration, and flux. Looks at the experiences of men and women in European societies before clearly defined nation-states had emerged. Topics include forms of political and cultural integration, the contacts between Europeans and non-Europeans in the Mediterranean and beyond, and the place of religion, art, and ideology, with attention to how Europeans’ experiences varied according to their gender, class, and race. 

HIST 1279 - History of the American Film Industry

Title: HIST 1279 – History of the American Film Industry

Instructor: Harlow Robinson

CRN: 17663

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MR)

Description: Examines and analyzes the artistic, commercial, cultural, and political history of the American film industry from its beginnings around 1900 to the present day. Emphasizes the development of the financial and artistic model of the classic “studio system” at the major Hollywood studios. Readings and lectures focus on economic factors that changed this system over time, such as labor-management relations and the rise and fall of the “star system.” Studies major genres and styles of film and their evolution, as well as their relationship to American historical and political trends: the Depression, World War II, the cold war, and the impact of the cultural revolution of the 1960s. Considers the changing role of the actor and of the director in Hollywood filmmaking. 

HIST 1390 - History of Espinage 2: Cold War Spies

Title: HIST 1390 – History of Espinage 2: Cold War Spies

Instructor: Jeff Burds

CRN: 15695

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MR)

Description: Explores the history of espionage during the Cold War era (1943–1991) through a series of case studies. Draws from a wide variety of published and unpublished primary and secondary sources, supplemented by modern theoretical and social science perspectives, literature, and films. Students work individually and in teams to explore the history of covert operations, including the following subthemes: the origins of the Cold War in World War II, the postwar battle for German scientists, containment and rollback, Venona and code breaking, nuclear spies, defectors, proxy wars, insurgencies and counterinsurgencies, terrorism, and technology. 

2000 Level Courses

HIST 2211 - The World Since 1945

Title: HIST 2211 – The World Since 1945

Instructors: Heather Streets-SalterPeter Fraunholtz, and TBA

CRN:  15005 (TBA) / 12066 (Streets-Salter) / 12202 (Fraunholtz)

Sequence:

TBA – Sequence E (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM WF)

Fraunholtz – ONLINE

Streets-Salter – 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Description: Examines the political, economic, social, and cultural relationship between the developed and developing world since the end of World War II. Topics include the Cold War, independence and national movements in developing countries, the globalization of the world economy, scientific and technological innovations, wealth and poverty, the eradication of some diseases and the spread of others, the fall of the Soviet Union, Middle East turmoil, and the enduring conflict between Israel and Palestine.

 

HIST 2280 - Hitler, Germany, and the Holocaust

Title: HIST 2280 – Hitler, Germany, and the Holocaust

Instructor: Timothy Brown

CRN: 17664

Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Description: Studies historical developments from Germany’s defeat in World War I to the end of World War II. Topics include the failure of Weimar democracy; Weimar culture; the rise to power of Hitler and National Socialism; Nazi culture and racial wars against alleged “degenerates”; the roles of party leaders, business and cultural elites, and ordinary Germans in supporting and legitimizing the Nazi dictatorship.

HIST 2282 - The Holocaust and Comparative Genocide

Title: HIST 2282 – The Holocaust and Comparative Genocide

Instructor: Natalie Bormann

CRN: 18133

Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Description: Examines the origins of the Holocaust, perpetrators and victims, and changing efforts to come to terms with this genocide. The Holocaust, the murder of six million Jews by Germans in Nazi-occupied Europe during World War II, is one of the crucial events of modern history. Investigates the uniqueness of the Holocaust relative to other acts of ethnic cleansing or genocide, including mass death in the New World and mass murder in Armenia, Bosnia, and Rwanda. 

HIST 2299 - Uses and Abuses of History: Historical Reasoning in U.S. Global and Domestic Policy

Title: HIST 2299 – Uses and Abuses of History: Historical Reasoning in U.S. Global and Domestic Policy

Instructor: Richard Freeland

CRN: 17980

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MR)

Description: Studies how historical information influenced decision making in the United States during four policymaking episodes of the post–World War II era: the confrontation with the Soviet Union during the Cold War; the expansion of the welfare state during the 1960s; the war in Vietnam; and the Reagan “revolution.” Focuses on decisions made by policymakers as these four episodes evolved. Analyzes why decision makers did what they did; what extent they were guided by their understanding of history; how accurate their historical information was; and how usefully they applied their historical understanding to the situation at hand. 

HIST 2301/2302 - 2nd Year History Seminar

Title: HIST 2301/2302 – 2nd Year History Seminar

Instructor: Katherine Luongo

CRN: 10731/10617

Sequence: B (2:50 PM – 4:30 PM MW)

Description: Introduces history majors to advanced techniques of historical practice in research and writing. Offers students an opportunity to conduct original research and write an original research paper. Seminar themes vary; students should check with the Department of History for a list of each year’s seminar offerings.

HIST 2304 - Special Topics: The World in the 1990's

Title: HIST 2304 – Special Topics: The World in the 1990’s

Instructor: Peter Fraunholtz

CRN: 16181

Sequence: ONLINE

Description: Special topics course on the world during the 1990’s

HIST 2308 - Law, Justice, and Society in Modern China

Title: HIST 2308 – Law, Justice, and Society in Modern China

Instructor: Philip Thai

CRN: 15696

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MR)

Description: Offers an overview of the historical development and function of law in Chinese society from the late imperial era to today and in comparison with other bodies of jurisprudence. Reading a wide range of scholarly articles and monographs, the course looks at “law” beyond jurisprudence and legal codes to examine its changing relationship with social customs, political institutions, religious traditions, popular culture, family and gender relations, and economic exchanges

HIST 2351 - Modern Japan

Title: HIST 2351 – Modern Japan

Instructor: Tom Havens

CRN: 17665

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MR)

Description: Examines state formation, economic growth, imperialism and colonialism, war and defeat, and contemporary culture. 

HIST 2370 - Renaissance to Enlightenment

Title: HIST 2370 – Renaissance to Enlightenment

Instructor: Robert Cross

CRN: 16165

Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Description: Covers the social, economic, political, and cultural transformations of Europe from the Renaissance to the French Revolution. Traces the rebirth of Catholic Europe from 1300; the Reformation; the religious wars; struggles over religious and scientific beliefs; advances in technology, science, and warfare; overseas expansion; the scientific revolution; and the Enlightenment. 

HIST 2431 - Immigration and Identity in the American Jewish Experience

Title: HIST 2431 – Immigration and Identity in the American Jewish Experience

Instructor: Jennifer Sartori

CRN: 17993

Sequence: 2 (9:15 AM – 10:20 AM MWR)

Description: Examines Jewish political, social, and cultural history from the arrival of the first group of Jews at New Amsterdam in 1654 to the present. Themes include immigration, adaptation, family life, religion, anti-Semitism, Zionism, the Holocaust, and American-Israeli relations

3000 Level Courses

HIST 3304 - Special Topics: History of Terrorism

Title: HIST 3304 – Special Topics: History of Terrorism

Instructor: Jeff Burds

CRN: 18045

Sequence: B (2:50  PM – 4:30 PM MW)

Description: Special topics course on the history of terrorism

HIST 3304 - Special Topics: History of Conservatism in USA

Title: HIST 3304 – Special Topics: History of Conservatism in USA

Instructor: Gretchen Heefner

CRN: 18112

Sequence: D (9:50 AM – 11:30 AM TF)

Description: Special topics course on the history of Conservatism in the United States. Will focus from the New Deal to the election of Donald Trump.

HIST 3322 - History of Medicine in North America

Title: HIST 3322 – History of Medicine in North America

Instructor: Chris Parsons

CRN: 18149

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MW)

Description: Surveys the history of medicine in what is now the United States between the arrival of European explorers in the sixteenth century and the end of the Second World War. Introduces students to exemplary moments in the history of medicine as it is practiced today and examines how these histories connect to the experience of the dispossessed, the enslaved, and the economically and culturally marginalized in American history. Encourages students to consider how the history of medicine has been written both by historians and practitioners. Explores the history of medicine both as a series of events, places, and people and as a method for opening up American history more broadly.

4000 Level Courses

HIST 4701 - Capstone

Title: HIST 4701 – Capstone

Instructor: Ilham Khuri-Makdisi

CRN: 10732

Sequence: F (1:35 AM – 3:15 PM TF)

Description: Offers students an opportunity to make use of advanced techniques of historical methodology to conduct original research and write a major, original research paper as the culmination of their work toward the history degree. This is a capstone research and writing seminar for history majors.