Home » Undergraduate Course Offerings – SPRING 2018

Undergraduate Course Offerings – SPRING 2018

Spring 2018

1000 Level Courses

HIST 1130 - Introduction to the History of the United States

Title: HIST 1130 – Introduction to the History of the United States

Instructor: James Robinson

CRN: 36804

Sequence: F (1:35 PM – 3:15 PM TF)

Description: Engages with the major issues in U.S. history. Topics include the interaction of native populations with European settlers, the American Revolution and the Constitution, slavery, the Civil War, industrialization and migration, the growth of government and rise of the welfare state, media and mass culture, struggles for civil rights and liberation, and America’s role in the world from independence to the Iraq wars. 

HIST 1150 - East Asian Studies

Title: HIST 1150 – East Asian Studies

Instructor: Tom Havens

CRN: 33211

Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Description: Seeks to provide an understanding of the constituent characteristics that originally linked East Asia as a region and the nature of the transformations that have occurred in the region over the last two thousand years. Concentrates on China and Japan, and addresses Korea and Vietnam where possible. Also seeks to provide students with effective interdisciplinary analytical skills as well as historical, ethical, cultural diversity, and aesthetic perspectives. Cross-listed with ASNS 1150. 

 

HIST 1187 - Introduction to Latin American History

Title: HIST 1187 – Introduction to Latin American History

Instructor: Louise Walker

CRN: 36805

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MR)

Description: Surveys major themes in Latin American history from the arrival of the first human inhabitants until the present through a diversity of primary and secondary sources. Examines the social, cultural, political, and economic transformations that shaped Latin America during this period. Emphasizes how concepts of race, class, gender, and sexuality informed these changes and the people’s experiences of them. Topics include migration, colonialism and postcolonialism, war and revolution, slavery and abolition, nationalism and nation building, democracy and despotism, urbanization, modernization, religion, imperialism and underdevelopment, human rights, drug policy and international relations, labor, the arts, popular culture, and the environment. 

HIST 1190 - Picturing Modernity: The Photographic Image in Culture and Society

Title: HIST 1190 – Picturing Modernity: The Photographic Image in Culture and Society

Instructor: Victoria Cain

CRN: 37299

Sequence: D ( 9:50 AM – 11:30 AM TF)

Description: Explores the role of the photographic image in culture and society from the early nineteenth century to the present day. Examines how the photographic image has altered cultural and perceptual patterns across the globe and investigates how cultural and social power have been influenced by photographs. Offers students an opportunity to read a cross-section of criticism, theory, and history and to study images and exhibitions to analyze how culture and history have been affected by and reflected in photographic images.

HIST 1200/1201 - First Year Research Seminar

Title: HIST 1200/1201 – First Year Research Seminar

Instructor: Chris Parsons

CRN: 32074 / 30745

Sequence:  B (2:50 PM – 4:30 PM MW) 

Description: Provides an introduction to historical methods, research, writing, and argument in which all students produce a substantial research project that passes through at least two revisions, and that is presented publicly to other members of the colloquium

HIST 1246 - World War II in the Pacific

Title: HIST 1246 – World War II in the Pacific

Instructor:  Tom Havens

CRN: 35075

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MW)

Description: Studies World War II, the most devastating war in history, which began in Asia and had a great long-term impact there. Using historical and literary texts, examines the causes, decisive battles, and lingering significance of the conflict on both sides of the Pacific.

HIST 1271 - Ancient Rome

Title: HIST 1271 – Ancient Rome

Instructor: Edward Gutiérrez

CRN: 32295

Sequence: F (1:35 PM – 3:15 PM TF)

Description: Studies the establishment and origins of civilization in the Italian peninsula from Etruscan, Latin, and Greek foundations through the rise and institutionalization of the republic, to the achievement of empire, to Rome’s interactions with diverse peoples and its decline and collapse. Themes include diversity, toleration, uses and dangers of power, Rome’s legalistic legacy, and the Latinization of Christianity. 

HIST 1286 - History of the Soviet Union

Title: HIST 1286 – History of the Soviet Union

Instructor: Regina Kazyulina

CRN: 35077

Sequence: F (1:35 PM – 3:15 PM TF)

Description: Surveys social, political, economic, demographic, and cultural developments in the former Soviet Union since 1917: the legacies of war and revolution, the civil war between the communists and the anti-communists, famine, the New Economic Policy, competing perspectives on the new regime, the rise of Stalin, the Cultural Revolution, collectivization and industrialization, the Purges, World War II and its impact, the “two camps” and the origins of the Cold War, the Soviet Union and the new East European system, Khrushchev, destalinization, intellectuals and the “thaw,” the Cuban missile crisis, the demise of Khrushchev, Brezhnev and the period of stagnation, the Gorbachev Revolution, Yeltsin, nationalism, and the dissolution.

HIST 1290 - Modern Middle East

Title: HIST 1290 – Modern Middle East

Instructor: Ilham Khuri-Makdisi

CRN: 34045

Sequence: D (9:50 AM – 11:30 AM TF)

Description: Studies Middle Eastern politics, culture, and society from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.

HIST 1297 - Reformers, Tribes, Saints: North Africa in World History, 1500 - Present

Title: HIST 1297 – Reformers, Tribes, Saints: North Africa in World History, 1500 – Present

Instructor: Peter Fraunholtz

CRN: 37486

Sequence: ONLINE

Description: Covers North Africa (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia) and its emergence as a key arena in the spread of the global economy, the struggle for human rights and gender equality, the emergence of civil society, and the struggle between moderate and militant forms of political Islam. Analyzes these recent challenges in the context of centuries of authoritarian tribal-based rule, religious reform movements, and popular efforts to withstand considerable foreign political and economic pressure from Europe and beyond. While sultans “ruled” the region for centuries, they did so in varying degrees with the assistance of or under pressure from reformers, tribes, and saints, both moderate and militant. Uses a variety of sources and media to investigate how these factors shape ongoing postcolonial political, social, and economic development.

HIST 1389 - History of Espinage 1: Antiquity to World War II

Title: HIST 1389 – History of Espinage 1: Antiquity to World War II

Instructor: Jeff Burds

CRN: 35078

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MR)

Description: Explores the history of espionage through a series of case studies from ancient Rome, Greece, and China; the Reformation; the Age of Discovery; the French Revolution; the American Civil War; World War I and the Russian Revolution; and World War II. Commonly referred to as the world’s “second oldest profession,” espionage is an intrinsic part of the relationships between communities, institutions, and states. Draws from a wide variety of published and unpublished primary and secondary sources, supplemented by modern theoretical and social science perspectives, literature, and films.

HIST 1500 - Modern Chinese History and Culture

Title: HIST 1500 – Modern Chinese History and Culture

Instructor: Philip Thai

CRN: 34949

Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Description: Introduces modern Chinese history and culture through literary works, films, and historical texts. Examines political, social, and cultural changes in China since 1800: the decline of empire; the New Culture Movement of the 1920s; the rise of nationalism and rural revolution; the changing roles of women; the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s; and China’s cinematic, literary, and economic engagement with the world since 1978. Taught in English and open to all undergraduates. CLTR 1500 and HIST 1500 are cross-listed.

2000 Level Courses

HIST 2000 - Native American Resistance: Past and Present

Title: HIST 2000 – Native American Resistance: Past and Present

Instructor: Nick Brown

CRN: 37302

Sequence: E (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM WF)

Description: Introduces the Indigenous peoples of North America and the academic field of Native American and Indigenous studies. Combines public history and public art, field trips, and original research to focus on the ongoing resistance to colonization and erasure and the resilience of Indian nations in New England and beyond. Covers particular themes, including the present-day impact of historical treaties and policies including land allotment, relocation, termination, boarding schools, and natural resource extraction.

HIST 2211 - The World Since 1945

Title: HIST 2211 – The World Since 1945

Instructors: Jack Gronau, Daniel Squizzero & Peter Fraunholtz

CRN:  35767 (Gronau) / 37476 (Squizzero) / 33156 (Fraunholtz)

Sequence:

Gronau – Sequence E (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM WF)

Squizzero – Sequence 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Fraunholtz – ONLINE

Description: Examines the political, economic, social, and cultural relationship between the developed and developing world since the end of World War II. Topics include the Cold War, independence and national movements in developing countries, the globalization of the world economy, scientific and technological innovations, wealth and poverty, the eradication of some diseases and the spread of others, the fall of the Soviet Union, Middle East turmoil, and the enduring conflict between Israel and Palestine.

 

HIST 2214 - War in the Modern World

Title: HIST 2214 – War in the Modern World

Instructor: Edward Gutiérrez

CRN: 37617

Sequence: G (3:25 PM – 5:05 PM TF)

Description: Provides an analysis of the political and economic revolutions that produced modern industrial warfare, and explores the causes, prosecutions, and effects of the major wars fought since the mid-nineteenth century. Large portions of the course focus on World Wars I and II, but attention is also paid to the smaller wars of this period, to unconventional and nonmilitary forms of warfare, to the international trade in arms and training, and to terrorism, both state-sponsored and transnational. Using films, simulations, and team projects, students explore the diplomatic, political, economic, social, cultural, and psychological impacts of these wars as well as their military and technological aspects.

HIST 2285 - America and the Holocaust

Title: HIST 2285 – America and the Holocaust

Instructor: Laurel Leff

CRN: 36855

Sequence: H (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM T / 2:50 PM – 4:30 PM R)

Description: Examines the American response to the Holocaust, in terms of both contemporaneous knowledge and actions and the lasting impact on policy and culture. Starts with early twentieth-century events, such as the Armenian genocide, that shaped later attitudes. Explores the prewar period, particularly U.S. immigration and isolationist policies. Assesses Americans’ knowledge of European events as the extermination campaign unfolded and fights ensued over rescue possibilities. Examines changing depictions of the Holocaust that emerged in the postwar period as a result of critical events such as the Eichmann trial and popular television and film portrayals. Finally, considers how perceptions of the Holocaust have shaped subsequent U.S. responses to genocide. HIST 2285, JRNL 2285, and JWSS 2285 are cross-listed.

HIST 2301/2302 - 2nd Year History Seminar HUMAN RIGHTS IN HISTORY

Title: HIST 2301/2302 – 2nd Year History Seminar

Instructor: Laura Frader

CRN: 30487 / 30486

Sequence: B (2:50 PM – 4:30 PM MW)

Description: Introduces history majors to advanced techniques of historical practice in research and writing. Offers students an opportunity to conduct original research and write an original research paper. Seminar themes vary; students should check with the Department of History for a list of each year’s seminar offerings. Focusing on human rights throughout history.

HIST 2330 - Colonial and Revolutionary America

Title: HIST 2330  – Colonial and Revolutionary America

Instructor: Robert Cross

CRN: 34046

Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Description: Covers the discovery and exploration of the New World, the settlement of the English, French, Dutch, Swedish, Spanish, and Russian colonies on the North American mainland, their development to 1763, the origins of their clashes with England, and the American Revolution.

HIST 2341 - History of the Western U.S.

Title: HIST 2341 – History of the Western U.S.

Instructor: Cameron Blevins

CRN: 36810

Sequence: B (2:50 PM – 4:30 PM MW)

Description: Examines the history of the western areas of North America that eventually became the United States. Topics include the history and culture of the indigenous peoples of the trans-Mississippi and far western United States; the political, economic, social, and cultural expansion of European settlers; cultural and military encounters of European and indigenous peoples; technological innovation and agriculture in the Great Plains, the Intermountain West, and the West Coast; cattle and sheep ranching; water and the West; ecology, conservation, and the politics of the “Sagebrush Rebellion”; Asian Americans in the West; mining; the Civil War in the West; African Americans and the Western experience; the cowboy and the importance of rodeo; and the West and the Native American in American popular culture (film, radio, television, literature, and advertising).

HIST 2360 - History of Capitalism in East Asia

Title: HIST 2360 – History of Capitalism in East Asia

Instructor: Philip Thai

CRN: 35613

Sequence: B (2:50 PM – 4:30 PM MW)

Description: Traces capitalism’s transformation of economic life in East Asia from the early modern era to the contemporary world. Explores changes in the human participation of production, exchange, and consumption. Reading a wide range of scholarly articles and monographs, the course examines key topics, including the great divergence debate, commodification of labor, consumer cultures, birth of industrialization, resilience of family enterprises, gender and the economy, and the role of the developmental state.

HIST 2373 - Gender and Sexuality in World History

Title: HIST 2373 – Gender and Sexuality in World History

Instructor: Bridget Keown

CRN: 36809

Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Description: Introduces key concepts in the fields of gender and identity studies as they apply to world history since about 1800. Offers students an opportunity to understand the critical significance of gender, sex, sexuality, and identity to world events and how these contentious subjects influence the contemporary world. Surveys a series of major movements in geopolitics, labor, economics, culture, and society in order to analyze how individual and group identities, as well as mass assumptions about behavior and performance, have shaped these events. Gender, sex, and sexuality are integral to class discussions of work, welfare, art, culture, violence, war, and activism. HIST 2373 and WMNS 2373 are cross-listed.

3000 Level Courses

HIST 3304 - Special Topics: Assassinations Throughout History

Title: HIST 3304 – Special Topics: Assassinations Throughout History

Instructor: Jeff Burds

CRN: 35416

Sequence: B (2:50  PM – 4:30 PM MW)

Description: Special topics course on the history of assassinations.

HIST 3304 - Special Topics: The City & Middle East History

Title: HIST 3304 – Special Topics: The City & Middle East History

Instructor: Ilham Khuri-Makdisi

CRN: 37303

Sequence: F (1:35 PM – 3:15 PM TF)

Description: Special topics course on the history of the city and Middle East History.

HIST 3330 - Global Cold War

Title: HIST 3330 – Global Cold War

Instructor:  Gretchen Heefner

CRN: 37312

Sequence: D (9:50 AM – 11:30 AM TF)

Description: Examines the Cold War, emphasizing how the Soviet-American struggle for global preeminence intersected with decolonization and the rise of the “Third World.” Uses primary sources, monographs, and scholarly articles to trace the major events and developments of the Cold War—ideological differences between the capitalist and socialist systems, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the construction of the Berlin Wall, the Vietnam War—while also exploring how and why the Cold War came to pervade economic, cultural, and social relations globally. Examines how unexpected actors—Cuban doctors and Peace Corps volunteers—responded to and shaped superpower rivalry. Considers how the Cold War continues to shape the world today.

4000 Level Courses

HIST 4701 - Capstone

Title: HIST 4701 – Capstone

Instructors: Louise Walker & Timothy Brown

CRN: 34044 (Walker) / 36803 (Brown)

Sequence: 2 (9:15 AM – 10:20 AM MWR WALKER) / A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MR BROWN)

Description: Offers students an opportunity to make use of advanced techniques of historical methodology to conduct original research and write a major, original research paper as the culmination of their work toward the history degree. This is a capstone research and writing seminar for history majors.