Home » Undergraduate Course Offerings – FALL 2018

Undergraduate Course Offerings – FALL 2018

Fall 2018

1000 Level Courses

HIST 1120 - Public History, Public Memory

Title: HIST 1120 – Public History, Public Memory

Instructor: Victoria Cain

CRN: 17987

Sequence: 2 (9:15 AM – 10:20 AM MWR)

Description: Explores the politics surrounding the creation and consumption of history outside the classroom. Draws on contemporary debates over memorials, museum displays, television and film, and other popular sources of historical information to answer the questions: How does memory become history? How, where, and why do people encounter and interpret history outside of the classroom? Why are certain versions of the past so controversial? Through readings, discussion, field trips, and assignments, offers students an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of public history’s challenges and opportunities and to develop more informed opinions about its philosophical, ethical, and practical aspects.

HIST 1130 - Introduction to the History of the United States

Title: HIST 1130 – Introduction to the History of the United States

Instructor: Cameron Blevins

CRN: 10653

Sequence: 2 (9:15 AM – 10:20 AM MWR)

Description: Engages with the major issues in U.S. history. Topics include the interaction of native populations with European settlers, the American Revolution and the Constitution, slavery, the Civil War, industrialization and migration, the growth of government and rise of the welfare state, media and mass culture, struggles for civil rights and liberation, and America’s role in the world from independence to the Iraq wars. 

HIST 1150 - East Asian Studies

Title: HIST 1150 – East Asian Studies

Instructors: Tom Havens & Philip Thai

CRNS: 14739 (Havens) / 13983 (Thai)

Sequences: 

Havens: 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Thai: 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Description: Seeks to provide an understanding of the constituent characteristics that originally linked East Asia as a region and the nature of the transformations that have occurred in the region over the last two thousand years. Concentrates on China and Japan, and addresses Korea and Vietnam where possible. Also seeks to provide students with effective interdisciplinary analytical skills as well as historical, ethical, cultural diversity, and aesthetic perspectives. Cross-listed with ASNS 1150. 

 

HIST 1170 - Empires, Wars, & Revolutions

Title: HIST 1170 – Empires, Wars, & Revolutions

Instructor: Laura Frader

CRN: 14476

Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Description: Examines how empires, wars and revolutions have influenced the development of the modern world, focusing on Europe and Europe’s connections with the non-European world. Explores how wars and revolutions led to the emergence of modern concepts of sovereignty, the state, and citizenship and how global competition between states led to the emergence of empires. Traces the promise of allegedly liberating ideologies and the political and economic revolutions to which they led, repeated wars and their aftermaths, and the challenges of recent world developments viewed from the perspective of history. Explores how human diversity and difference have shaped modern societies through history and how human difference and multiculturalism have both fostered and posed challenges to civic sustainability. Interrogates the meanings of “modernity,” democracy and totalitarianism, capitalism and socialism, and globalization.

HIST 1200/1201 - First Year Research Seminar

Title: HIST 1200/1201 – First Year Research Seminar

Instructors: Victoria Cain & Louise Walker

CRNS: 13625/12179 (CAIN) & 13053/13624 (Walker)

Sequences:

Cain  – A (11:45 AM – 1:25  PM MW)

Walker – 2 (9:15 AM – 10:20 AM MWR)

Description: Provides an introduction to historical methods, research, writing, and argument in which all students produce a substantial research project that passes through at least two revisions, and that is presented publicly to other members of the colloquium

HIST 1206 - Drug Trade & Drug Wars

Title: HIST 1206 – Drug Trade & Drug Wars

Instructor: Louise Walker

CRN: 17497

Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Description: Analyzes the role of drugs in world history. From the early use of stimulants such as coca and sugar to the “war on drugs” and narco-terrorism, the course examines drugs as commodities in the world economy. Focuses primarily on opiates, stimulants, and hallucinogens from the nineteenth century to the present, considering how changing social and cultural mores led different drugs to be coded as licit and illicit. Topics include traditional uses, early medical use, trade networks, prohibition, black market, and drug cultures, as well as the role of drugs in the histories of industrialization, imperialism, and cold war geopolitics. Sources include historical scholarship, declassified intelligence reports, documentaries, novels, movies, songs, and art.

HIST 1252 - Japanese Language & Culture

Title: HIST 1252 – Japanese Language & Culture

Instructor:  Tom Havens

CRN: 175001

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MW)

Description: Studies World War II, the most devastating war in history, which began in Asia and had a great long-term impact there. Using historical and literary texts, examines the causes, decisive battles, and lingering significance of the conflict on both sides of the Pacific.

HIST 1253 - History of Vietnam Wars

Title: HIST 1253 – History of Vietnam Wars

Instructor: Peter Fraunholtz

CRN: 17499

Sequence: ONLINE

Description: Presents a history of military conflicts on the Indochinese peninsula from its precolonial settlement, internal developments and divisions, its stormy relationship with China, French colonization and the resistance to it, the rise of the Viet Minh during World War II, the postwar struggle against the French, the impact of the Cold War, and the involvement of the United States after 1950 in the creation of two Vietnams and in the conflict that engulfed it and its neighbors, Laos and Cambodia, in the decades that followed. Emphasizes the roles of nationalism and communism in the twentieth-century conflicts and the motives for American intervention. Films revealing the reactions of Americans to the escalating conflict are shown and evaluated.

HIST 1285 - Introduction to Russian Civilization

Title: HIST 1285 – Introduction to Russian Civilization

Instructor: TBA

CRN: 17985

Sequence: E (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM WF)

Description: Examines the origins of Russian culture in Eastern Orthodoxy and relations with the Byzantine Empire, and the subsequent evolution of Kiev, Moscow, and St. Petersburg as cultural/political centers, up to the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. Includes readings in medieval Russian literature and nineteenth-century fiction, with consideration of the development of music and the visual arts. Conducted in English.

2000 Level Courses

HIST 2000 - Native American Resistance: Past and Present

Title: HIST 2000 – Native American Resistance: Past and Present

Instructor: Nick Brown

CRN: 17498

Sequence: E (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM WF)

Description: Introduces the Indigenous peoples of North America and the academic field of Native American and Indigenous studies. Combines public history and public art, field trips, and original research to focus on the ongoing resistance to colonization and erasure and the resilience of Indian nations in New England and beyond. Covers particular themes, including the present-day impact of historical treaties and policies including land allotment, relocation, termination, boarding schools, and natural resource extraction.

HIST 2211 - The World Since 1945

Title: HIST 2211 – The World Since 1945

Instructors: TBA, Heather Streets-Salter & Peter Fraunholtz

CRN:  13995 (TBA) / 11726 (Streets-Salter) / 11821 (Fraunholtz)

Sequence:

TBA- Sequence E (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM WF)

Streets-Salter – Sequence 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Fraunholtz – ONLINE

Description: Examines the political, economic, social, and cultural relationship between the developed and developing world since the end of World War II. Topics include the Cold War, independence and national movements in developing countries, the globalization of the world economy, scientific and technological innovations, wealth and poverty, the eradication of some diseases and the spread of others, the fall of the Soviet Union, Middle East turmoil, and the enduring conflict between Israel and Palestine.

 

HIST 2280 - Hitler, Germany, and the Holocaust

Title: HIST 2280 – Hitler, Germany, and the Holocaust

Instructors: Timothy Brown

CRN: 15683

Sequence: B (2:50 PM – 4:30 PM MW)

Description: Studies historical developments from Germany’s defeat in World War I to the end of World War II. Topics include the failure of Weimar democracy; Weimar culture; the rise to power of Hitler and National Socialism; Nazi culture and racial wars against alleged “degenerates”; the roles of party leaders, business and cultural elites, and ordinary Germans in supporting and legitimizing the Nazi dictatorship.

HIST 2301/2302 - 2nd Year History Seminar

Title: HIST 2301/2302 – 2nd Year History Seminar

Instructor: Katherine Luongo

CRN: 10650 / 10549

Sequence: B (2:50 PM – 4:30 PM MW)

Description: Introduces history majors to advanced techniques of historical practice in research and writing. Offers students an opportunity to conduct original research and write an original research paper. Seminar themes vary; students should check with the Department of History for a list of each year’s seminar offerings. Focusing on human rights throughout history.

HIST 2308 - Law, Justice, and Society in Modern China

Title: HIST 2308 – Law, Justice, and Society in Modern China

Instructor: Philip Thai

CRN: 14475

Sequence: B (2:50 PM – 4:30 PM MW)

Description: Offers an overview of the historical development and function of law in Chinese society from the late imperial era to today and in comparison with other bodies of jurisprudence. Reading a wide range of scholarly articles and monographs, the course looks at “law” beyond jurisprudence and legal codes to examine its changing relationship with social customs, political institutions, religious traditions, popular culture, family and gender relations, and economic exchanges.

HIST 2375 - The Tudors, the Stuarts, and the Birth of Modern Britain

Title: HIST 2375 – The Tudors, the Stuarts, and the Birth of Modern Britain

Instructor: Robert Cross

CRN: 17502

Sequence: 3 (10:30 AM – 11:35 AM MWR)

Description: Examines the history of early modern England as well as Ireland, Wales, and Scotland. Follows the development of England from a small backwater to one of the most powerful European nations by the end of the seventeenth century. Analyzes the constantly shifting relationships between the various cultural identities within Britain. Concentrates on British history not only from the perspective of the elites but also the ordinary people whose names have often been lost to history. Key themes include the growth of the British Empire, issues of gender, the interactions between England and the Celtic fringes, and participation in the political franchise.

HIST 2376 - Britain & the British Empire

Title: HIST 2376 – Britain & the British Empire

Instructor: Thanasis Kinias

CRN: 17986

Sequence: E (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM WF)

Description: Studies the history of the empire on which the sun never set from the 18th century through the 20th century. Traces the rise of Britain as a major world power. Topics include nationalism; the growth of capitalism and the international economy; and the role of women and gender, scientific racism, and anticolonial resistance movements.

HIST 2390 - Africa & the World in Early Times

Title: HIST 2390 – Africa & the World in Early Times

Instructor: Katherine Luongo

CRN: 17496

Sequence: 4 (1:35 PM – 2:40 PM MWR)

Description: Examines the place of Africa in the world from 1000 C.E. to the mid-19th century. Investigates the histories of ancient Egypt, the savannah and forest regions of West Africa, coastal and interior East Africa, and southern Africa. Explores the rise of medieval city-states and empires, the activities of the Atlantic slave trade and the trans-Saharan and Indian Ocean slave trades, debates over mass migration and the spread of language groups, the rise of agriculture, the development of nonstate political structures, the growth of trading societies, and the development of new cultural forms. Links Africa’s early histories to current debates about the role of history in contemporary politics and to present understandings of Africa’s historical place in world affairs.

3000 Level Courses

HIST 3322 - History of Medicine in North America

Title: HIST 3322 – History of Medicine in North America

Instructor:  Chris Parsons

CRN: 17988

Sequence: A (11:45 AM – 1:25 PM MR)

Description: Surveys the history of medicine in what is now the United States between the arrival of European explorers in the 16th century and the end of the Second World War. Introduces exemplary moments in the history of medicine as it is practiced today and examines how these histories connect to the experience of the dispossessed, the enslaved, and the economically and culturally marginalized in American history. Encourages students to consider how the history of medicine has been written both by historians and practitioners. Explores the history of medicine both as a series of events, places, and people and as a method for opening up American history more broadly.

4000 Level Courses

HIST 4701 - Capstone

Title: HIST 4701 – Capstone

Instructors: Timothy Brown

CRN: 10651

Sequence: Mondays, 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM

Description: Offers students an opportunity to make use of advanced techniques of historical methodology to conduct original research and write a major, original research paper as the culmination of their work toward the history degree. This is a capstone research and writing seminar for history majors.