Graduate Course Offerings – FALL 2017

Fall 2017

5000 Level Courses

HIST 5101 - Theory and Methodology I

Title: HIST 5101 – Theory and Methodology I

Instructor: Laura Frader

CRN: 11196

Sequence: Wednesdays, 4:30 – 7:00 PM

Description: Examines the following questions in the context of major issues in current historical research and debate. Where do historical questions come from, and how do we answer them? How do we produce knowledge about historical events and processes? What theoretical models guide historians work? Emphasizes interdisciplinary approaches as well as concrete techniques in historical research. Required of all first-year graduate students.

HIST 5237 - Issues & Methods in Public History

Title: HIST 5237 – Issues & Methods in Public History

Instructor: Marty Blatt

CRN: 12970

Sequence: Tuesdays, 4:30 – 7:00 PM

Description: Examines and analyzes major issues and methods in public history in the United States and the world. Topics include the nature and meaning of national memory and myth, the theory and practice of historic preservation, rural and land preservation and the organizational structures and activities associated with those efforts, the interrelationship of historical museums and popular culture, the history and organization of historic house museums, historical documentary filmmaking, historical archaeology in world perspective, interpreting “ordinary” landscapes, and the impact of politics on public history.

7000 Level Courses

HIST 7221 - Topics in World History

Title: HIST 7221 – Topics in World History

Instructor: Harlow Robinson

CRN: 17669

Sequence: Thursdays, 4:30 – 7:00 PM

Description: Special Topic course on the Soviet History

HIST 7250 - Topics in Public History: The Public History of Incarceration

Title: HIST 7250 – Topics in Public History

Instructor: Marty Blatt

CRN: 17667

Sequence: Wednesdays, 4:30 – 7:00 PM

Description: HIST 7250, the Public History of Incarceration, will examine the history and public presentation of prisons in the United States.  We will do so through readings, guest speakers, engaged discussion, and critical writing.  The course will include an examination of such issues as mass incarceration, immigrant detention, the confinement of the mentally ill in prisons, rehabilitation versus punishment, and more, and we will examine public history sites including Alcatraz and Eastern Penitentiary.  A central project of the class will be the production of four panels to be included in the traveling exhibit, “States of Incarceration,” which will be on view on the Northeastern campus in spring, 2018.  

HIST 7312 - Research Seminar in American History

Title: HIST 7312 – Research Seminar in American History

Instructor: Gretchen Heefner

CRN: 18259

Sequence: Thursdays, 4:30 – 7:00 PM

Description: Offers research and writing on selected aspects of American history.

HIST 7322 - Research Seminar: 1968 in Global Perspective

Title: HIST 7322 – Research Seminar: 1968 in Global Perspective

Instructor: Tim Brown

CRN: 17668

Sequence: Wednesdays, 4:30 – 7:00 PM

Description: Examines the significance of 1968, when a worldwide wave of largely student-driven unrest signaled that “something happened” during that year. From London to Tokyo, from Chicago to Prague, from Mexico City to Paris, the young generation of the late sixties challenged the old order. But why? Engages students with the growing interdisciplinary theoretical literature on international protest movements, before going on to examine a number of national “1968s.” Uses primary and secondary sources to seek to understand what these events meant locally, how they were connected globally, and to what extent they can fit into a larger pattern of a world event known as “1968.” Requires a significant research paper dealing with one of these or another question determined in consultation with the instructor.

HIST 7370 - Texts, Maps, and Networks: Readings and Methods in Digital History

Title: HIST 7370 – Texts, Maps, and Networks: Readings and Methods in Digital History

Instructor: Benjamin Schmidt

CRN: 17666

Sequence: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 PM

Description: Introduces the methods and practice of history in a digital age. Offers students an opportunity to see the wide variety of work being done computationally by historians and other humanists today and to obtain the background to be creative producers of new work and critical consumers of existing projects. The rise of computing technology and the Internet has the potential to reshape all parts of historical practice, from curation to research to dissemination. Examines the historian’s craft in three primary domains: the creation of digital sources, the algorithmic transformations that computers can enact on cultural materials like texts, and the new ecologies of publishing and scholarly communication made possible by new media.