Graduate Course Offerings – SPRING 2017

Spring 2017

5000 Level Courses

HIST 5102 - Theory and Methodology II

Title: HIST 5102 – Theory and Methodology II

Instructor: Heather Streets-Salter

CRN: 31039

Sequence: Thursdays, 4:30 – 7:00 PM

Description: Continues HIST 5101. Offers an advanced exploration of the theories and methods used by historians to develop students’ ability to understand and critique the work of other historians. Emphasis is on theories and methods in world history, such as comparative models, systemic approaches, and focus on interconnections. Explores what it means to have a local, national, or global perspective, and how world history fits in with other fields of historical scholarship. Required of all PhD students. Prereq. HIST 5101 and junior, senior, or graduate standing.

HIST 5244 - Historic Preservation

Title: HIST 5244 – Historic Preservation

Instructor: Victoria Cain

CRN: 37707

Sequence: Tuesdays, 4:30 – 7:00 PM

Description: Introduces historic preservation, with attention to the history, the philosophy, and the practical problems of preservation. Prereq. Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

7000 Level Courses

HIST 7219 - Humanities Data Analysis

Title: HIST 7219 – Humanities Data Analysis

Instructor: Ryan Cordell

CRN: 37957

Sequence: Thursdays, 4:30 – 7:00 PM

Description: Introduces humanities data analysis for graduate students 

HIST 7221 - Ottoman Empire & the World

Title: HIST 7221 – Ottoman Empire & the World

Instructor: Ilham Khuri-Makdisi

CRN: 35912

Sequence: Tuesdays, 4:30 – 7:00 PM

Description: Special Topic course on the Ottoman Empire

HIST 7250 - Public History of Slavery

Title: HIST 7250 – Public History of Slavery

Instructor: Marty Blatt

CRN: 34959

Sequence: Wednesdays, 4:30 – 7:00 PM

Description: W.E.B. DuBois made the notable statement in 1903 that “the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line.” This declaration had much resonance for the 20th century and still is highly relevant in the 21st century. James and Lois Horton identify the “nation’s most enduring contradiction: the history of American slavery in a country dedicated to freedom.”

This course will examine the difficult challenges in addressing slavery in public history venues. We will examine an overview of the history of slavery in the United States but concentrate on how that history has been interpreted and distorted. We will look at the public history of slavery over time and assess several case studies involving commemorations, educational programming, tours, exhibits, and films. Several guest speakers will enhance the course content.

By the end of the course students will have developed an understanding of how slavery has been treated in public history contexts; will have a clear picture of how critical a role race plays in the American narrative; will have a solid grasp of controversies with respect to slavery and public history; will have been exposed to a variety of approaches to address slavery in public history.

HIST 7323 - Modern Colonialism

Title: HIST 7323 – Modern Colonialism

Instructor: Katherine Luongo

CRN: 35910

Sequence: Mondays, 4:30 – 7:00 PM

Description: Focuses on modern colonialism from the seventeenth to the mid-twentieth century, concentrating primarily on European colonialism. Students have an opportunity in this research seminar to investigate many aspects of the colonial project, such as the techniques and practices of empire, the production of knowledge, orientalism and othering, the construction of race and gender, environmental impacts, the growth of nationalism and other forms of resistance, and decolonization. Students are expected to use the methodological and theoretical approaches explored in the course to produce an independent research paper based on primary sources.

HIST 7701 - Advanced Research Seminar in World History

Title: HIST 7701 – Advanced Research Seminar in World History

Instructor: Laura Frader

CRN: 37888

Sequence: Wednesdays, 4:30 – 7:00 PM

Description: Entails research and preparation of a world history paper intended to be part of a larger dissertation. Includes intensive historiographical reading related to the research topic.