Home » Undergraduate » Fall 2016 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Fall 2016 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Fall 2016

The following information is subject to change.

For the most up-to-date and comprehensive course schedule, including meeting times, course additions, cancellations, and room assignments, refer to the Banner Class Schedule on the Registrar’s website.

For curriculum information, see the Undergraduate Full-Time Day Programs catalog, also on the Registrar’s website.

(* Designates 2007 NU Core; % Designates 2016 NUpath)

 

Course Spotlights:

FINAL_FL16 Animals Objects Humans FL16 Modern Short Story_2016-07-25

Fall 2016 Courses by Major Requirement

Foundational

Instructor: Professor Beth Britt

CRN: 13391

Sequence: 4 (MWTh 1:35–2:40)

Additionally fulfills: 2007, 2016 NU Core

Description:
How do we persuade others to change their minds or take action? How do we come to beliefs about ourselves, each other, and the world around us? What is the relationship between language and truth, between knowledge and belief? How do verbal as well as nonverbal symbols—such as images, architecture, clothing, and music—influence what we do, believe, and think we know? This course explores these questions by examining the work of three important thinkers—Aristotle (fourth century B.C.E.), Kenneth Burke (20th century), and Judith Butler (20th-21st century)—who articulate the range and diversity of rhetorical theory. We will read theoretical texts by each of these authors with an eye toward applying them to examples of rhetoric drawn from modern-day culture. Assignments include informal writing, a mid-term exam, two short papers, and a take-home final.

Instructor: Professor Nicole Aljoe

CRN: 12965

Sequence: 2 (MWTh 9:15–10:20)

Additionally fulfills: 2016 NU Core

Description:
A foundational course required of all English majors. Introduces students to the conventions, strategies, debates, and concepts germane to Literary and Cultural studies. Explores strategies for reading, interpreting, and theorizing about texts; for conducting research; for developing skills in thinking analytically and writing clearly about complex ideas; and for entering into dialogue with scholarship in the field.

Instructor: Professor Sari Altschüler

CRN: 18503

Sequence: F (TuF 1:35–3:15)

Additionally fulfills: 2016 NU Core

Description:
A foundational course required of all English majors. Introduces students to the conventions, strategies, debates, and concepts germane to Literary and Cultural studies. Explores strategies for reading, interpreting, and theorizing about texts; for conducting research; for developing skills in thinking analytically and writing clearly about complex ideas; and for entering into dialogue with scholarship in the field.

Instructor: Professor Kathleen Kelly

CRN: 15054

Sequence: B (MW 2:50–4:30)

Additionally fulfills: 2007, 2016 NU Core

Description:

The development of “Global Literature” as a category over that past thirty years or so arises out of a desire to break down barriers that have traditionally kept literatures of the world separate, divided by language, nationalism, geography, and politics. In this course, we’ll read several long narratives—tales of adventures to places like Troy, the faerie Otherworld, and the far reaches of Mongolia—from 2100 BCE through 1500 CE. Can we trace out a line of influence form one text to another? How do genre conventions travel over time and from place to place (imitated, borrowed, or stolen—in the most positive sense)? Texts may include The Epic of Gilgamesh (Mesopotamia), Homer’s The Iliad and The Odyssey (Greece), excerpts from Dante’s The Divine Comedy (Italy), Mandeville’s Travels (England); the Táin Bó Cúailnge (Ireland); the Song of Roland (France); Sundiata (Africa); and excerpts from The Mabinogion (Wales), The Secret History of the Mongols (Mongolia), the Tale of Genji (Japan), and the Arabian Nights (India, Persia [modern Iran], Syria and Egypt). We will supplement our texts with a few films (the 2004 Troy, the 1954 Ulysses, the anime version of the Tale of Genji, Sundiata, Y Mabinogi, and the Russian Mongol). All texts in translation, of course! Requirements: brief response papers, a brief in-class presentation, and one six-page formal paper, and a final exam.

Literary Periods - Early Literatures

Instructor: Professor Erika Boeckeler

CRN: 14278

Sequence: A (MTh 11:45–1:25)

Additionally fulfills: 2007, 2016 NU Core

Description:
Description not available.

Literary Periods - 17th-18th Centuries

Instructor: Professor Francis Blessington

CRN: 17709

Sequence: A (MTh 11:45–1:25)

Additionally fulfills: N/A

Description:

Students will read Paradise Lost with supplementary readings in the minor poems and prose. The course’s emphasis will be upon Milton as a writer of poetry. Midterm, final, paper, and short reports.

Literary Periods - 19th Century

Instructor: Professor Sari Altschüler

CRN: 18177

Sequence: D (TuF 9:50–11:30)

Additionally fulfills: N/A

Description:
In this course we will explore two entwined concerns of the nineteenth-century American novel: sex and the development of the city. We will begin the course with late eighteenth century seduction narratives in which fears about the fate of the United States were routed through stories of heroines ruined by handsome soldiers in New York and Philadelphia. We will then move through mid-century exposés of seedy urban underworlds and will conclude by examining the fate of sex and the city in the late nineteenth century. In this latter part of the course we will focus particularly on how sex and the city are refigured through African American and immigrant experience. As we think through these shifts over the long nineteenth century, we will be interested in how narratives about gender, sex, and sexuality register social, economic, and political change as well as how these stories shape and are shaped by race, ethnicity, class, and ability. At the same time, we will track formal developments in the novel over this period and consider what kinds of stories the genre makes possible and what kinds of stories it occludes.

Students in this class will complete two major assignments: 1) A five-page midterm paper analyzing one of the central texts in terms of the themes we are exploring together. These papers will be due at different points in the mid-semester for different students, as the perspectives introduced in them will help shape our group inquiry, and 2) an 8-10 page final research paper in which students will have the opportunity to pursue their own questions about the texts more fully. There will also be some smaller assignments aimed at helping student develop their ideas for the midterm and final papers.

Instructor: Professor Theo Davis

CRN: 17710

Sequence: 4 (MWTh 1:35–2:40)

Additionally fulfills: N/A

Description:
This course will take a close look at the essays, poetry, and journals of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, two nineteenth-century American writers and friends. In their often whimsical, prophetic, philosophical and at times personal writings, they each considered what it would mean to think that a new day was dawning in human existence: how might persons live to their true potential, in harmony with nature and with society? In addition to studying these writers’ literary and philosophical achievements, we’ll consider their troubled friendship, and their circle of colleagues, friends, and rivals. Requirements: three six to seven page papers and a reading journal. This course will include a field trip to Concord, Mass., where Emerson and Thoreau both lived.

Literary Periods - 20th-21st Centuries

Instructor: Professor Bonnie TuSmith

CRN: 16003

Sequence: 3 (MWTh 10:30–11:35)

Additionally fulfills: Comparative; Diversity major requirement

Description:
This course explores a diverse range of modern short stories by prominent 20th-21st century American writers.  It includes topics such as the evolution of the short story form, literary technique (e.g., narrative structure, implied author, point of view, visual imagery, linguistic minimalism, vernacular usage, repetition, characterization, setting), social/historical context, and the short story cycle as a specific literary genre.  Requirements include brief weekly responses to readings (posted on Blackboard), annotation of scholarly article, textual explication (close reading), and a final paper.

Instructor: Professor Gary Goshgarian

CRN: 15055

Sequence: D (TuF 9:50–11:30)

Additionally fulfills: N/A

Description:

“Bestseller” is an artificial category determined solely by numbers of books sold. However, we will explore some reasons behind the success of recent quality bestselling novels–i.e., what special fantasies, obsessions, themes, plot lines, characters, action, etc. appeal to popular tastes. The selections will represent a cross-section of mainstream and genres titles—mystery, thriller, literary–by men and women, some of whom who have become brand names. Guest bestselling author(s) will visit class. We will also watch and discuss movies made from some novels studied in the course. Student writing: announced quizzes; midterm & final take-home essay exams (7-10 pages each).

Comparative

Instructor: Professor Marina Leslie

CRN: 17695

Sequence: D (TuF 9:50–11:30)

Additionally fulfills: 2016 NU Core

Description:

This first-year seminar will explore utopia as a site for literary, political, social, and personal experimentation.  We will read utopian fiction from its classical origins to contemporary popular culture and science fiction, while responding to this tradition with critical and creative exercises.  Together we will consider utopia in its many forms, as no place, good place, paradox, map, charter, idea, conversation, impossibility, disaster, and hope.  Requirements:   Students in this class will complete three projects,  1) identify and critique contemporary utopian experiments and share their findings with the class; 2) produce a five-page analysis of one of the fictional utopian texts we are reading together and; 3) produce and analyze their own creative utopian “artifacts,” to be shared in a class exhibit.

Instructor: Professor Kathleen Kelly

CRN: 17696

Sequence: A (MTh 11:45–1:25)

Additionally fulfills: 2016 NU Core

Description:

Most of us have done it: we talk to animals and objects. “Gooooooooooood dog!” And Otis the dog tilts his head this way and that and waggles his ears, and one feels connected. We chirp at birds while on a hike, and hope that they chirp back. We mutter as we search our pockets: “Keys, where are you?” And we curse our laptops—and never get the response that we desire, alas. And many of us (I’m betting), at one time or another, imagine animals and objects talking back: what would the cat say if she could? Surely that million-year-old stone found on the beach has a story to tell?

A good deal of literature and art all over the world is devoted to human-animal and human-object relations (in conversation or not), from the first cave paintings to the latest CGI movie in which animals and objects are anthropomorphized. (Disney films are particularly notable in this respect.) And most cultures have a tradition of painting animals, carving wood and other substances into animal shapes (both animal and object!); wearing leather, feathers, bone, shells, and jewels; collecting dolls, guns, baseball cards, stamps, books, tattoos; treasuring souvenirs and exchanging gifts. In this course, we’ll examine the ways in which we humans interact with the more-than-human world, with a focus on animals (wild and domesticated, as pets, on farms, in zoos, as food and clothing) and objects (natural and found as well as homemade or manufactured). We’ll certainly explore all of the pleasures of our relations with animals and objects, but we’ll also consider the serious ethical issues with respect to use, abuse, and overuse of the animate and inanimate occupants of the more-than-human world. We’ll also create our own narratives, videos, music, and whatever else we feel inspired to devise as a way to talk back to animals and objects, and to talk about them to each other.

Instructor: Professor Bonnie TuSmith

CRN: 16003

Sequence: 3 (MWTh 10:30–11:35)

Additionally fulfills: Literary Periods – 20th-21st Centuries; Diversity major requirement

Description:
This course explores a diverse range of modern short stories by prominent 20th-21st century American writers.  It includes topics such as the evolution of the short story form, literary technique (e.g., narrative structure, implied author, point of view, visual imagery, linguistic minimalism, vernacular usage, repetition, characterization, setting), social/historical context, and the short story cycle as a specific literary genre.  Requirements include brief weekly responses to readings (posted on Blackboard), annotation of scholarly article, textual explication (close reading), and a final paper.

Instructor: Professor Bonnie TuSmith

CRN: 17698

Sequence: 4 (MWTh 1:35–2:40)

Additionally fulfills: Diversity major requirement; 2007, 2016 NU Core

Description:
This NU Core course examines contemporary literature by prominent American writers of Asian descent (e.g., Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Indian, Vietnamese, and Filipino).  It covers a range of prose works, including novels, short stories, and memoirs.  Potential discussion topics are: representations of Asian American identities, immigrant and ethnic perspectives, generational differences, racial and ethnic stereotypes, the Asian diaspora, the legacies of war, gender roles, Chinatowns, culture and community, family relationships, and vernacular speech.  Requirements include brief weekly responses to readings (posted on Blackboard), a class presentation, and a final paper.

Instructor: Professor Gary Goshgarian

CRN: 17699

Sequence: F (TuF 1:35–3:15)

Additionally fulfills: N/A

Description:

This course explores English and American horror fiction from Edgar Allan Poe and Bram Stoker (Dracula) to contemporary masters such as Stephen King, Dean Koontz, and others. Using short stories, novels, and movies, we will examine the evolution of horror fiction and the various themes, techniques, and uses of macabre. Student writing: announced quizzes, midterm & final take-home essay exams (7-10 pages); optional critical analysis of some horror work not covered in the course. (7-10 pages).  Occasional horror author visits.

Instructor: Professor Patrick Mullen

CRN: 18499

Sequence: 3 (MWTh 10:30–11:35)

Additionally fulfills: N/A

Description:
This course will explore the history of the novel in its comic mode.  The readings will range considerably taking us from the early 17th century Spain to the 21stcentury US.  We will consider how the comic mode and the technologies of the novel might make such connections across history and geography meaningful.  We will consider the comic in relation to the creation of narrative voice and the form of the novel, the comic in relation to the body and the politics of gender and sexuality, as well as comic engagements with nationhood, race, and the geopolitics of empire and colonialism.  The course focuses on classic novels as well as lesser-known works.  Students will be required to keep up with a considerable amount of reading and should expect to spend some time reading each day in order to stay current.  The course requires active participation in class.  In the end, students will have the chance to read key texts in the history of the novel and will have a greater appreciation of the comic mode and how it relates to narrative representation.  Students will also have the chance to laugh a lot!  This course is both intellectually challenging and hilarious.

Theories & Methods

Instructor: Professor Beth Britt

CRN: 17703

Sequence: 2 (MWTh 9:15–10:20)

Additionally fulfills: N/A

Description:

In 1995, the televised double murder trial of O.J. Simpson brought courtroom rhetoric into the living rooms of millions of viewers. Skillful oral performances — such as defense attorney Johnnie Cochrane’s memorable summation line, “If [the glove] doesn’t fit, you must acquit” — seemed to epitomize rhetoric’s ability to mesmerize the listener, to spin the facts to favor one outcome over another. This ability, decried since the birth of rhetoric over two millennia ago, has prompted many attempts to “get past” the rhetoric, to separate content from form, substance from delivery. Yet scholars in all fields—including law—have begun to believe that words and ideas cannot be neatly or easily separated, that all ideas come from a particular perspective and are conceivable (and expressible) only through language, which is always biased. For the law, this recognition means that rhetoric doesn’t just exist in courtroom oratory; it exists in every piece of legislation, every judicial opinion, and even the very procedures through which law does its work. This recognition also means that the law is always “interested,” reinforcing particular social relations and ways of thinking at the expense of others. Because law “plays on a field of pain and death” (as legal scholar Robert Cover puts it), the relationship between rhetoric and law thus has profound implications for justice. This course explores this relationship. Readings are drawn from ancient and contemporary philosophy and rhetoric, legal studies, and legal practice. Assignments include two papers and a take-home final exam. No prior coursework in rhetoric or law is required.

Instructors: Professor Erika Boeckeler and Professor Ryan Cordell

CRN: 18500

Sequence: B (MW 2:50–4:30)

Additionally fulfills: N/A

Description:

What is a book? This class introduces you to the major stages in the creation, production, and cultural life of books through the ages, and thinks through the future of books in today’s world of new media. We will ask and answer questions like: Does it matter that people in the past read “the same” books we read today but in vastly different forms? What relationship is there between the technical, economic, and social conditions of books’ creation and the way scholars interpret them? How did early printers print illustrations; how did they print in color?  How do we decide which from the multiple authoritative versions of Shakespeare’s Hamlet is the “real” play? If Shakespeare had nothing to do with printing who were Shakespeare’s invisible collaborators? What is the future of books in a digital age?

To begin answering these and other questions, you will learn to identify and interpret key features of books and manuscripts through hands-on experiences with works from the medieval to the modern in archives and special collections. Course topics include: bibliography (the art of book description), format throughout the ages, publishing and audiences, typography, modes of illustration, seriality, the circulation of books, cutting and pasting, non-book printing and non-paper texts, maps, digitization, electronic literature.

Writing

Instructor: Professor Stuart Peterfreund

CRN: 18417

Sequence: A (MTh 11:45–1:25)

Additionally fulfills: 2016 NU Core

Description:

Skillful writing requires that one be a skilled and motivated reader, and that s/he have texts that serve as favorites and perhaps also as models for emulation. In the first phase of the course, each student will submit for discussion two pieces of modern or contemporary (20th-21st century) creative writing (poems, short stories, or prose nonfiction) that matters—personally, artistically, or both. We will discuss this work both for what it tells us about the literature we read and about the writing we produce. In the second phase of the course, the class will engage in a text-aided discussion of the techniques and forms of poetry, short fiction, and prose nonfiction. And in the third phase, the class will turn to a discussion of student work. Everyone will responsible for providing written commentary on each draft submitted. Students will be required to submit a minimum number of first drafts of poetry and a minimum number of first-draft pages of prose, of which at least half must be revised. The minimum total number of first-draft pages to be submitted is twelve. Everyone must submit at least three pages of poetry and three of prose. Students must revise and resubmit at least six pages of this work before submitting additional work. Course grades will be assigned on the basis electronic portfolios containing each student’s revised work.

Instructor: Professor Mya Poe

CRN: 17700

Sequence: 3 (MWTh 10:30–11:35)

Additionally fulfills: Diversity major requirement; 2007, 2016 NU Core

Description: Explores the various ways that linguistic diversity shapes our everyday, academic, and professional lives. Students will learn about language policy, the changing place of World Englishes in globalization, and what contemporary theories of linguistic diversity, such as translingualism, mean for writing. Students will be invited to research their own multilingual communities and histories.

Instructor: Laurie Edwards, MFA

CRN: 17701

Sequence: D (TuF 9:50–11:30)

Additionally fulfills: 2016 NU Core

Description:

This course will examine how expressive writing can serve as a healing tool for physical or emotional adversity. Select essays and excerpts from patients, physicians, and artists will demonstrate the transformative power of the personal narrative. We will explore examples of the “healing through writing” genre, and we will discuss DeSalvo’s theory of how it works. We will also investigate the ways technology and social media have influenced storytelling and the publishing of healing narratives. Most importantly, we will compose three major written and digital healing narratives, and will use substantive writing workshops and peer review to revise your work. By the end of the semester, you will be able to identify suitable places of publication for your healing narrative and understand the process of pitching your work. You will also have the chance to reflect on the process of creating and revising a personal narrative through process journals.

Instructor: Professor Nicole Aljoe

CRN: 17705

Sequence: 3 (MWTh 10:30–11:35)

Additionally fulfills:  Diversity and Experiential Ed major requirements; 2007, 2016 NU Core

Description:

Explores how writing shapes the life of, and life in, the city of Boston. Offers students an opportunity to research and write about the city and participate in a community-based writing project. Drawing on writing from the 18th century to the 21st, we will consider how Boston is constructed in a range of discourses and disciplines. For Fall 2016, the course will focus on writing by and about Boston’s African American communities, and culminate in the creation of a digital anthology and series of exhibits titled, The Early Black Boston Almanac.

Instructor: Professor Neal Lerner

CRN: 16007

Sequence: D (TuF 9:50–11:30)

Additionally fulfills: 2016 NU Core

Description:

Creative non-fiction is a genre in which writers apply narrative strategies and techniques to factual material. This course will orient writers within the genre as we address the following questions: What is creative non-fiction? What makes it different than other approaches to writing about factual material? What is the non-fiction writer’s obligation to “the truth”? What does the best creative non-fiction require of its writers? Over the semester, we’ll read and write our way to answers through a variety of non-fiction forms, for example, narrative essays, travel and science writing, memoir, editorials. We’ll also practice cross-genre and hybrid forms, for example, non-fiction prose mixed with audio, video, or images. Class time will include lectures, discussion of readings, writing exercises, and weekly feedback for peers in a workshop format. The topics for creative non-fiction writing apply to a wide array of disciplines, including the humanities, the sciences, and journalism.

This course satisfies Northeastern’s Writing-Intensive requirement due to the amount of writing students will do, the attention to the writing process and revision, and the immersion in specific genres of written prose.

Instructor: Professor Stuart Peterfreund

CRN: 17706

Sequence: B (MW 2:50–4:30)

Additionally fulfills: 2016 NU Core

Description:

This course is a workshop in the writing and close reading of original poetry. Students are encouraged to experiment in free verse and/or established poetic forms. The workshop begins with a brief review of the formal features of poetry, followed by a sampling of selected contemporary poetry by established writers. But most of class’s meeting time will be devoted to in-class discussion and written responses to student work by all of the students and the instructor.

Diversity

Instructor: Professor Bonnie TuSmith

CRN: 16003

Sequence: 3 (MWTh 10:30–11:35)

Additionally fulfills: Literary Periods – 20th-21st Centuries; Comparative

Description:
This course explores a diverse range of modern short stories by prominent 20th-21st century American writers.  It includes topics such as the evolution of the short story form, literary technique (e.g., narrative structure, implied author, point of view, visual imagery, linguistic minimalism, vernacular usage, repetition, characterization, setting), social/historical context, and the short story cycle as a specific literary genre.  Requirements include brief weekly responses to readings (posted on Blackboard), annotation of scholarly article, textual explication (close reading), and a final paper.

Instructor: Professor Bonnie TuSmith

CRN: 17698

Sequence: 4 (MWTh 1:35–2:40)

Additionally fulfills: Comparative major requirement; 2007, 2016 NU Core

Description:
This NU Core course examines contemporary literature by prominent American writers of Asian descent (e.g., Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Indian, Vietnamese, and Filipino).  It covers a range of prose works, including novels, short stories, and memoirs.  Potential discussion topics are: representations of Asian American identities, immigrant and ethnic perspectives, generational differences, racial and ethnic stereotypes, the Asian diaspora, the legacies of war, gender roles, Chinatowns, culture and community, family relationships, and vernacular speech.  Requirements include brief weekly responses to readings (posted on Blackboard), a class presentation, and a final paper.

Instructor: Professor Mya Poe

CRN: 17700

Sequence: 3 (MWTh 10:30–11:35)

Additionally fulfills: Writing major requirement; 2007, 2016 NU Core

Description: Explores the various ways that linguistic diversity shapes our everyday, academic, and professional lives. Students will learn about language policy, the changing place of World Englishes in globalization, and what contemporary theories of linguistic diversity, such as translingualism, mean for writing. Students will be invited to research their own multilingual communities and histories.

Instructor: Professor Nicole Aljoe

CRN: 17705

Sequence: 3 (MWTh 10:30–11:35)

Additionally fulfills:  Writing and Experiential Ed major requirements; 2007, 2016 NU Core

Description:

Explores how writing shapes the life of, and life in, the city of Boston. Offers students an opportunity to research and write about the city and participate in a community-based writing project. Drawing on writing from the 18th century to the 21st, we will consider how Boston is constructed in a range of discourses and disciplines. For Fall 2016, the course will focus on writing by and about Boston’s African American communities, and culminate in the creation of a digital anthology and series of exhibits titled, The Early Black Boston Almanac.

Experiential Ed

Instructor: Professor Nicole Aljoe

CRN: 17705

Sequence: 3 (MWTh 10:30–11:35)

Additionally fulfills:  Diversity and Writing major requirements; 2007, 2016 NU Core.

Description:

Explores how writing shapes the life of, and life in, the city of Boston. Offers students an opportunity to research and write about the city and participate in a community-based writing project. Drawing on writing from the 18th century to the 21st, we will consider how Boston is constructed in a range of discourses and disciplines. For Fall 2016, the course will focus on writing by and about Boston’s African American communities, and culminate in the creation of a digital anthology and series of exhibits titled, The Early Black Boston Almanac.

Capstone Seminar

Instructor: Professor Theo Davis

CRN: 10571

Sequence: B (MW 2:50–4:30)

Additionally fulfills: 2016 NU Core

Description:
What did the coming of modernity feel like for the human beings who lived at the dawn of the twentieth century? For American naturalist writers including Frank Norris, Theodore Dreiser, Kate Chopin, Stephen Crane, and Edith Wharton, the world was a complex of social and natural forces against which individual subjects struggled mightily but often fruitlessly. We will consider the aesthetic, historical, and political aspects of complex fictions of the individual shaped by both the destiny of biological being and by the driving force of historical change. This course will also include consideration of major critical and theoretical texts on naturalism. Requirements: three six to seven papers and a final presentation.

Upcoming Course Offerings

Spring 2017 (subject to change)

The following information is subject to change.

For the most up-to-date and comprehensive course schedule, including meeting times, course additions, cancellations, and room assignments, refer to the Banner Class Schedule on the Registrar’s website.

For curriculum information, see the Undergraduate Full-Time Day Programs catalog, also on the Registrar’s website.

(* Designates 2007 NU Core; % Designates 2016 NU Core)


Foundational

  • ENGL 1400 Introduction to Literary Studies %
  • ENGL 1410 Introduction to Writing Studies %
  • ENGL 1700 Global Literature to 1500 *%

Literary Periods – Early Literatures

  • ENGL 3150 Topics in Early Literatures: King Arthur Then & Now

Literary Periods – 17th-18th Centuries

  • *new* ENGL 3160 Topics in 17th-18th Century British Literatures: Race & Slavery in the British Novel

Literary Periods – 19th Century

  • ENGL 2260 Romantic Poetry
  • ENGL 3190 Topics in 19th Century American Literatures: Ability/Disability

Literary Periods – 20th-21st Centuries

  • ENGL 2410 Contemporary American Literature
  • ENGL 3730 20th-21st Century Major Figure: Kurt Vonnegut

Comparative

  • ENGL 1151 Art and Science of the Field Note
  • ENGL xxxx Narrative Medicine
  • ENGL 1450 Reading and Writing in the Digital Age *%
  • ENGL 1500 British Literature to 1800 *%
  • ENGL 2460 Multi-ethnic Literatures of the U.S.
  • ENGL 2520 Science Fiction

Theories and Methods

  • ENGL 1140 English Grammar
  • ENGL 3340 Technologies of Text %
  • ENGL 3381 Teaching of Writing *%
  • ENGL 4070  Topics in Literary Criticism: Queer Theory, Lit, and Film

Writing

  • ENGL 2710 Style and Editing %
  • ENGL 2740 Writing and Community Engagement %
  • ENGL 3378 Fiction Workshop
  • ENGL 3380 Topics in Writing: Slam Poetry
  • ENGL 3382 Publishing in the 21st Century *%

Diversity

  • ENGL 2460 Multi-ethnic Literatures of the U.S.
  • ENGL 3160 Topics in 17th-18th Century British Literatures: Race & Slavery in the British Novel

Experiential Ed

  • ENGL 2740 Writing and Community Engagement %
  • ENGL 3381 Teaching of Writing %
  • ENGL 3382 Publishing in the 21st Century *%

Capstone

  • ENGL 4710 Capstone Seminar: Sonnets and Skulls %
  • ENGL 4720 Capstone Project %
Fall 2017 (subject to change)

The following information is subject to change.

For the most up-to-date and comprehensive course schedule, including meeting times, course additions, cancellations, and room assignments, refer to the Banner Class Schedule on the Registrar’s website.

For curriculum information, see the Undergraduate Full-Time Day Programs catalog, also on the Registrar’s website.

(* Designates 2007 NU Core; % Designates 2016 NU Core)


Foundational

  • ENGL 1160 Introduction to Rhetoric *%
  • ENGL 1400 Introduction to Literary Studies %
  • ENGL 1700 Global Literature to 1500 *%

Literary Periods – Early Literatures

  • ENGL 1600 Introduction to Shakespeare *%
  • ENGL 3150 Topics in Early Literatures: Greek Tragedy

Literary Periods – 17th-18th Centuries

  • ENGL 3170 Topics in 17th-18th Century American Literatures: Gender & Empire

Literary Periods – 19th Century

  • ENGL 2260 Romantic Poetry
  • ENGL 2330 American Renaissance
  • ENGL 3720 19th Century Major Figure: Poe or Melville (TBD)

Literary Periods – 20th-21st Centuries

  • ENGL 2440 Modern Bestseller
  • ENGL 3200 Topics in 20th-21st C British Literature: Irish Women Writers

Comparative

  • ENGL 1xxx Make Me Laugh
  • ENGL 1450 Reading and Writing in the Digital Age *%
  • ENGL 1502 American Literature to 1865 *%
  • ENGL 2520 Science Fiction
  • ENGL 3xxx American Women Writers

Theories and Methods

  • ENGL 4400 Opening the Archive %

Writing

  • ENGL 1xxx What is Good Writing
  • ENGL 2700 Creative Writing %
  • ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts *%
  • ENGL 3380 Topics in Writing: Slam Poetry

Diversity

 

  • ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts *%

Experiential Ed

  • ENGL 2760 Writing in Global Contexts *%
  • ENGL 4400 Opening the Archive %

Capstone

  • ENGL 4710 Capstone Seminar: Victorian and Neo-Victorian Text %
Spring 2018 (subject to change)

The following information is subject to change.

For the most up-to-date and comprehensive course schedule, including meeting times, course additions, cancellations, and room assignments, refer to the Banner Class Schedule on the Registrar’s website.

For curriculum information, see the Undergraduate Full-Time Day Programs catalog, also on the Registrar’s website.

(* Designates 2007 NU Core; % Designates 2016 NU Core)


Foundational

  • ENGL 1400 Introduction to Literary Studies %
  • ENGL 1410 Introduction to Writing Studies %
  • ENGL 1700 Global Literature to 1500 *%

Literary Periods – Early Literatures

  • ENGL 1600 Introduction to Shakespeare *%
  • ENGL 3150 Topics in Early Literatures: TBD

Literary Periods – 17th-18th Centuries

  • ENGL 2240 17th Century British Literature

Literary Periods – 19th Century

  • ENGL 3180 Topics in 19th Century British Literature: TBD

Literary Periods – 20th-21st Centuries

  • ENGL 3685 From Kafka to Kushner

Comparative

  • ENGL 1xxx Literature and Democracy
  • ENGL 1500 British Literature to 1800 *%
  • ENGL 2450 Postcolonial Literature *%
  • ENGL 2510 Horror Fiction

Theories and Methods

  • ENGL 1140 English Grammar
  • ENGL 3340 Technologies of Text %
  • ENGL 4410 Research in Rhetoric & Writing

Writing

  • ENGL 2770 Writing to Heal %
  • ENGL 3xxx Document Design
  • ENGL 3377 Poetry Workshop %
  • ENGL 3378 Fiction Workshop %
  • ENGL 3382 Publication Arts *

Diversity

  • ENGL 1700 Global Literature to 1500 *%
  • ENGL 2450 Postcolonial Literature *%

Experiential Ed

  • ENGL 3340 Technologies of Text %
  • ENGL 3382 Publication Arts *

Capstone

  • ENGL 4710 Capstone Seminar: The Press & Popular 19th Century Literature %
  • ENGL 4720 Capstone Project %