Home » Undergraduate » Fall 2017 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Fall 2017 Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Fall 2017

The following information is subject to change.

For the most up-to-date and comprehensive course schedule, including meeting times, course additions, cancellations, and room assignments, refer to the Banner Class Schedule on the Registrar’s website.

For curriculum information, see the Undergraduate Full-Time Day Programs catalog, also on the Registrar’s website.

Please note: 4000-level courses are open to all students (not just Juniors and Seniors), and everyone is encouraged to register for them. In the English Department, the course number designates the type of course, not the level of difficulty—4000-level courses are organized around a focused reading list and topic of analysis, and 1000-level classes are broad surveys.

Course Spotlights
 

 

Fall 2017 English Courses by Major Requirement

Foundational

ENGL 1160 – Introduction to Rhetoric: The Great Debates

Instructor: Professor Belinda Walzer
CRN: 12907
Sequence: *NEW TIME* A (11:45AM-1:25PM MR)
Attributes:

How do we persuade others to change their minds or take action? How does language help shape our beliefs about ourselves, each other, and the world around us? What is the relationship between an event and its representation, between witness and advocacy, and between language and truth? This course explores these questions and more by providing a historical overview of rhetorical theory as well as a deep investigation of the debates around representation, subjectivity, truth, and witness from a variety of historical and contemporary rhetorical conversations and authors, including Aristotle (4th century B.C.E), the pragmatists, (19th century), and post-structuralists (20th – 21st century). We will read theoretical texts from these major conversations with an eye towards applying them to examples of rhetoric drawn from contemporary issues of human rights and social justice. Assignments might include informal writing, a midterm exam, short response papers, and a final paper.

ENGL 1400 – Introduction to Literary Studies

Section 1
Instructor: Professor Sari Altschuler
CRN: 12565
Sequence: *NEW TIME* 2 (9:15-10:20AM MWR)
Attributes:

Offers a foundational course designed for English majors. Introduces the methods and topics of English literary and textual studies, including allied media (e.g., film, graphic narrative). Explores strategies for reading, interpreting, and theorizing about texts; for conducting research; for developing skills in thinking analytically and writing clearly about complex ideas; and for entering into written dialogue with scholarship in the diverse fields that comprise literary studies.

Section 2
Instructor: Professor Kathleen Coyne Kelly
CRN: 16538
Sequence: *NEW TIME* B (2:50-4:30PM MW)
Attributes:

Catalog description: Offers a foundational course designed for English majors. Introduces the methods and topics of English literary and textual studies, including allied media (e.g., film, graphic narrative). Explores strategies for reading, interpreting, and theorizing about texts; for conducting research; for developing skills in thinking analytically and writing clearly about complex ideas; and for entering into written dialogue with scholarship in the diverse fields that comprise literary studies.

In this version of the course, we will read a number of poems, short stories, and critical articles that will allow us to engage with the above goals in a variety of ways, both informal and formal. Our central text is Barbara Kingsolver’s Flight Behavior (2012), a tale of endangered monarch butterflies and the humans who become caught up in their fight for survival in, of all places, rural Tennessee (the butterflies attempt to overwinter here when they should have gone further south to Mexico). Kingsolver offers us lyrical writing and insightful characterization while exploring the most pressing issue of our time: keeping ecologies diverse and thriving in the face of climate change and human intervention. Requirements: a series of short papers, oral presentations, and a final independent project.

Literary Periods

Early Literatures

ENGL 1600 – Introduction to Shakespeare

Instructor: Professor Erika Boeckeler
CRN: 13625
Sequence: 3 (10:30-11:35AM MWR)
Attributes:

An introduction to the four principle genres of Shakespeare’s drama: comedy, tragedy, history, and romance.  We will consider the enduring power of Shakespeare’s work and legacy through close reading of the plays and an investigation of Shakespeare’s cultural, historical, generic and performance contexts.  Short papers and a final exam, with creative and/or performance options for interested students.

17th-18th Centuries

ENGL 2240 – Seventeenth-Century British Literature

Instructor: Professor Francis Blessington
CRN: 17463
Sequence: 3 (10:30-11:35AM MWR)
Attributes:

The seventeenth century in England was a great age of lyric poetry and prose. The poets produced poems that are still standards and models for modern poets. We shall examine the context and the techniques of such poets as John Donne, George Herbert, Ben Jonson, Robert Herrick, Richard Crashaw, Henry Vaughan, John Dryden and others. The prose of the era represents a spectrum of experimental styles, Ciceronian, anti-Ciceronian, Baroque, scientific, personal—a handbook of various ways to write. We shall consider selections from Francis Bacon, Robert Burton, Thomas Browne, John Bunyon, Samuel Pepys, and others.

19th Century

ENGL 3720 – Nineteenth-Century Major Figure: Edgar Allen Poe

Instructor: Professor Sari Altschuler
CRN: 17468
Sequence: B (2:50-4:30PM MW)
Attributes: 

Description forthcoming

20th-21st Centuries

ENGL 2301 (formerly 2430) The Graphic Novel

Instructor: Professor Hillary Chute
*NEW* CRN: 18573
Sequence: 3 (10:30-11:35AM MWR)
Attributes:

The word-and-image medium of comics as a narrative form.  How to read comics—and what they teach us about reading—in addition to the creative practices that go into making them.  We will examine antecedents including “engraved novels,” newspaper comic strips, “wordless novels,” underground comic books, and punk fanzines to understand the graphic novel’s rise in the 1970s in addition to exploring current directions.  Authors include Art Spiegelman, Alison Bechdel, Chris Ware, Joe Sacco, Lynda Barry, Gary Panter, Phoebe Gloeckner, Keiji Nakazawa, and Marjane Satrapi, among others.  Will include visits from artists to discuss the craft of this verbal-visual form.

ENGL 2440 – Modern Bestseller

Instructor: Professor Gary Goshgarian
CRN: 14139
Sequence: D (9:50-11:30AM TF)
Attributes: 

“Bestseller” is an artificial category determined solely by numbers of books sold. However, we will explore some reasons behind the success of recent quality bestselling novels–i.e., what special fantasies, obsessions, themes, plot lines, characters, action etc. appeal to popular tastes.  The selections will represent a cross-section of mainstream and genres titles—mystery, thriller, literary–by men and women, some of whom who have become brand names.

Guest bestselling author(s) will visit class. We will also watch and discuss movies made from some novels studied in the course.

Student writing: announced quizzes; midterm & final take-home essay exams (7-10 pages each); optional critical paper analyzing a bestselling novel not read in the course.

Comparative

ENGL 1450 – Reading and Writing in the Digital Age

Instructor: Professor Ryan Cordell
CRN: 17461
Sequence: 4 (1:35-2:40PM MWR)
Attributes: 

  • Major Requirement Comparative
  • NU Core Humanities Lvl 1
  • NUpath Analyzing/Using Data (AD)
  • NUpath Interpreting Culture (IC)
  • NUpath Writing Intensive in the Major (WI)
  • *Updated 8/2/17*Enrollment is restricted to freshman and sophomores.

This seminar explores how we tell stories and make arguments in the age of the internet and “big data.” We will investigate literary works from a variety of eras and genres—including fiction, poetry, film, and video games—to see how writers and readers have grappled with the implications of new reading and informational technologies throughout history. We will also study the ways writers have produced new kinds of writing in response to such changes. We will analyze historical interplays among technology, new media, culture, and literature in order to better understand the social and literary upheavals of our own technological moment. Students will develop skills for making sense of textual data, as well as for writing about data and writing with data through a variety of media. Students will weave together code and prose in multimodal, online publications; analyze texts using computational tools; and develop projects, such as literary “bots,” that explore the boundaries between digital technology and creative expression.

Note: “Reading and Writing in the Digital Age” presumes no prior experience with computational methods and thus is well suited for students interested a “hands-on” introduction to the medium that underlies much of early-twenty-first-century life. The class offers all students an opportunity to develop their abilities analyzing, interpreting, and creating texts in a range of media through a blending of traditional and computational methods.

ENGL 1502 – American Literature to 1865

Instructor: Professor Theo Davis
CRN: 17462
Sequence: 4 (1:35-2:40PM MWR)
Attributes:

Surveys the major American writers and major literary forms from the colonial period to the Civil War. Includes works by such writers as Bradstreet, Taylor, Wheatley, Cooper, Poe, Hawthorne, Douglass, Stowe, Melville, and Emerson. We will pay particular attention to the development of ideas of the nation, and of the problems of consensus, disagreement, and dissent.

ENGL 2420 – Contemporary Poetry

Instructor: Professor Eunsong Kim
CRN: 18009
Sequence: 4 (1:35-2:40PM MWR)
Attributes: 

This course will focus on the development of US poetics movements post 1945.

We will pay attention to how poets sought to differentiate their racial, gender and class politics through artistic and formal innovations. Particular attention will be given to: Objectivists, Confessional poetry, the Black Arts Movement and Language Poetry, as well as to present day collectives. In thinking about the developments of new movements and their debates we will look at the social movements surrounding and fueling the growth of new poetic camps, such as the Anti-capitalist and Anti-War movements, the Black Panther Party, US Women’s Rights, and Anti-colonial transnational feminisms. In order to grapple with the tensions of contemporary poetic movements, we will read from a range of anthologies, manifestos, critical essays and the collections of Anne Sexton, Louis Zukofsky, Nikki Giovanni, Harryette Mullen, Layli Long Soldier, Bhanu Kapil, Craig Santos Perez and Don Mee Choi.

ENGL 2455 – American Women Writers

Instructor: Professor Carla Kaplan
CRN: 17464
Sequence: B (2:50-4:30PM MW)
Attributes:

“American Women Writers” surveys similarities and differences across a range of American women’s writing and through a variety of different genres. In addition to a broad overview of American styles, forms, and themes, the course introduces some of the central concepts of feminist and poststructural literary criticism, including performativity, identification, reader response, the politics of recuperation, sexuality/textuality, critical race theory, and intersectionality. Throughout the semester we will hone the analytical and expressive skills essential to making effective arguments.  Requirements include readings, two papers, and participation. No examinations, but short quizzes are possible.

ENGL 2520 – Science Fiction

Instructor: Professor Gary Goshgarian
CRN: 17465
Sequence: F (1:35-3:15 TF)
Attributes:

This course traces the development of various science fiction themes, conventions, and approaches from early human-versus-machine tales to alien encounters. We will examine how SF is a time capsule of ideas about the relationship between humans and technology, humans and nature, humans and the stars in all their promise and dangers. From Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, through H.G. Wells, through short fiction of the “golden age” (1940s and 50s), to the visions of current authors.  Short stories, novels, movies.

Student writing: announced quizzes; midterm & final take-home essay exams (7-10 pages each); optional critical paper (7-10 page) analyzing some SF work.

ENGL 3582 – Children’s Literature

Instructor: Professor Erika Boeckeler
CRN: 17467
Sequence: 4 (1:35-2:40PM MWR)
Attributes: 

Once upon a time, there was a class that read children’s classics—such as fairy tales, Jane Eyre, and The Wizard of Oz—as literature, examining their enduring literary effects as well as the history of literacy and the historical construction of childhood in which they appear. The class also considered children’s books as a major site of technical innovation in illustration, interactive design like pop-up and other movable part books, graphic novels, and in electronic literature. In-class discussions were augmented with trips to local archives, conversations with Boston publishers, and Q&A’s with children’s book authors. Everyone left deeply informed about what children’s literature teaches us about reading strategies, the history of literary criticism, theories about education, and the staying power of these tales in our world today. And they all lived happily ever after.

ENGL 3676 – Representing Gender and Sexuality in Literature: Irish Women Writers

Instructor: Professor Patrick Mullen
CRN: 18008
Sequence: 1:35-3:15 p.m. TF
Attributes:

The last thirty years has seen a boom in the number of Irish women authors. This course will connect the vibrant contemporary writing scene with the long history of women writing in Ireland. We will consider how living writers use or abuse literary traditions in order to write about their worlds. We will read novelists, poets, singer-song writers along side scholars and politicians. The course will host a symposium that will give us the chance to meet contemporary authors. The course is an introduction to Irish studies and an excellent preparation for students who might like to deepen their study of Irish culture in the Dialogue of Civilization: Irish Literature, Film, and Society in summer 2018. Authors we will read may include: Maria Edgeworth, Augusta Gregory, Kate O’Brien, Somerville and Ross, Anne Enright, Claire Kilroy, Belinda McKeon, and Eimear McBride. Students will complete a series of short responses, write a symposium presentation, and complete a final essay.

Theories & Methods

ENGL 1140 – Grammar: The Architecture of English

Instructor: Professor Janet Randall
CRN: 17460
Sequence: 3 (10:30-11:35AM MWR)
Attributes: 

What are the “nuts and bolts” of English? This course provides you with the basic tools for analyzing sentence structure and understanding how the building blocks of sentences – from articles to appositives –   fit together.  Using a precise vocabulary for talking about the elements of sentences, we will examine our mental grammatical “architecture”, a system of linguistic rules that we follow when we produce and understand sentences.  Along the way, we will observe how structure affects meaning, and discover a new way to see the organizing principles of language.

ENGL 1160 – Introduction to Rhetoric: The Great Debates

Instructor: Professor Belinda Walzer
CRN: 12907
Sequence: 2 (9:15-10:20AM MWR)
Attributes:

How do we persuade others to change their minds or take action? How does language help shape our beliefs about ourselves, each other, and the world around us? What is the relationship between an event and its representation, between witness and advocacy, and between language and truth? This course explores these questions and more by providing a historical overview of rhetorical theory as well as a deep investigation of the debates around representation, subjectivity, truth, and witness from a variety of historical and contemporary rhetorical conversations and authors, including Aristotle (4th century B.C.E), the pragmatists, (19th century), and post-structuralists (20th – 21st century). We will read theoretical texts from these major conversations with an eye towards applying them to examples of rhetoric drawn from contemporary issues of human rights and social justice. Assignments might include informal writing, a midterm exam, short response papers, and a final paper.

*NEW Course#* ENGL 2150 – Literature and Digital Diversity

Instructor: Professor Elizabeth Maddock Dillon and Dr. Sarah Connell
CRN: 18231
Sequence: A (11:45AM-1:25PM MR)
Attributes: 

This course focuses on the use of digital methods to analyze and archive literary texts, with particular attention to the ways in which digital methods can be used to expand (or limit) access to and understanding of literary texts by both canonical and historically marginalized writers and communities. The class will focus on three main areas: text encoding, textual analysis, and archive construction. We will consider literary texts and corpora including works by well-known authors such as Shakespeare, together with collections by marginalized writers, including slave narratives and writings by early modern women. Students will consider what counts as literature, and how computers, databases, and analytical tools give substance to social constructions of aesthetic, cultural, and intellectual value as inflected by race and gender.

ENGL 3381 – Diversity and Inclusion: The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing in a Transnational Context – Service Learning

Instructor: Professor Belinda Walzer
CRN: 17466
Sequence: *NEW TIME* 2 (9:15-10:20AM MWR)
Attributes: 

How does the study and practice of writing differ across contexts – international, institutional, and/or individual? How does the globalization of higher education impact the courses that almost all students must take at almost all US colleges – the writing course? How does this impact the work that tutors do in a Writing Center? This course takes up the scholarship and conversation around the teaching of writing to engage with these questions and more. This course also offers students an opportunity for a service-learning practicum to work in a local writing center and prepares students for future tutoring in the Northeastern Writing Center or teaching. Students will gain deeper insight into their own writing processes by writing in a variety of genres, conducting primary research, responding to readings, and reflecting on experiences. ENGL 3381 satisfies the experiential learning and writing-intensive requirement for English majors and is a great option for Writing minors and Rhetoric minors.

Writing

ENGL 2700 – Creative Writing

Instructor: Professor Francis Blessington
CRN: 16454
Sequence: A (11:45AM-1:25PM MR)
Attributes:

A course in writing the three genres of poem, story, and play. Workshop format. Text: Creative Writing by David Starkey, 2nd ed.

ENGL 2760 – Writing in Global Contexts

Instructor: Professor Jonathan Benda
CRN: 15782
Sequence: 3 (10:30-11:35AM MWR)
Attributes: 

Explores the various ways that linguistic diversity shapes our everyday, academic, and professional lives. Offers students an opportunity to learn about language policy, the changing place of World English in globalization, and what contemporary theories of linguistic diversity, such as translingualism, mean for writing. Invites students to explore their own multilingual communities or histories through empirical or archival research.

ENGL 3377 – Poetry Workshop

Instructor: Professor Eunsong Kim
CRN: 15786
Sequence: B (2:50-4:30PM MW)
Attributes: 

This course will focus on the writing and reading of poetry. We will experiment with a range of forms and techniques, from sestinas to blank and free verse, to ars poetica and epistolary poems. As we write and read each other’s poem, we will engage in discussions concerning the politics of form, the stakes of metaphor, the ethics of witness, and the tensions of documentation. Each week we will workshop a poem, and discuss the possibilities of new technique. Writers in the course will work to provide careful feedback for the poems presented in the workshop and work to experiment with various forms/techniques. Poets in the course will practice reading and memorizing their poetry and the poems of others, culminating in a final reading and class anthology. 

Diversity

*NEW Course#* ENGL 2150 – Literature and Digital Diversity

Instructor: Professor Elizabeth Maddock Dillon and Dr. Sarah Connell
CRN: 18231
Sequence: A (11:45AM-1:25PM MR)
Attributes: 

This course focuses on the use of digital methods to analyze and archive literary texts, with particular attention to the ways in which digital methods can be used to expand (or limit) access to and understanding of literary texts by both canonical and historically marginalized writers and communities. The class will focus on three main areas: text encoding, textual analysis, and archive construction. We will consider literary texts and corpora including works by well-known authors such as Shakespeare, together with collections by marginalized writers, including slave narratives and writings by early modern women. Students will consider what counts as literature, and how computers, databases, and analytical tools give substance to social constructions of aesthetic, cultural, and intellectual value as inflected by race and gender.

ENGL 2455 – American Women Writers

Instructor: Professor Carla Kaplan
CRN: 17464
Sequence: B (2:50-4:30PM MW)
Attributes:

“American Women Writers” surveys similarities and differences across a range of American women’s writing and through a variety of different genres. In addition to a broad overview of American styles, forms, and themes, the course introduces some of the central concepts of feminist and poststructural literary criticism, including performativity, identification, reader response, the politics of recuperation, sexuality/textuality, critical race theory, and intersectionality. Throughout the semester we will hone the analytical and expressive skills essential to making effective arguments.  Requirements include readings, two papers, and participation. No examinations, but short quizzes are possible.

ENGL 2760 – Writing in Global Contexts

Instructor: Professor Jonathan Benda
CRN: 15782
Sequence: 3 (10:30-11:35AM MWR)
Attributes: 

Explores the various ways that linguistic diversity shapes our everyday, academic, and professional lives. Offers students an opportunity to learn about language policy, the changing place of World English in globalization, and what contemporary theories of linguistic diversity, such as translingualism, mean for writing. Invites students to explore their own multilingual communities or histories through empirical or archival research.

ENGL 3676 – Representing Gender and Sexuality in Literature: Irish Women Writers

Instructor: Professor Patrick Mullen
CRN: 18008
Sequence: 1:35-3:15 p.m. TF
Attributes:

The last thirty years has seen a boom in the number of Irish women authors. This course will connect the vibrant contemporary writing scene with the long history of women writing in Ireland. We will consider how living writers use or abuse literary traditions in order to write about their worlds. We will read novelists, poets, singer-song writers along side scholars and politicians. The course will host a symposium that will give us the chance to meet contemporary authors. The course is an introduction to Irish studies and an excellent preparation for students who might like to deepen their study of Irish culture in the Dialogue of Civilization: Irish Literature, Film, and Society in summer 2018. Authors we will read may include: Maria Edgeworth, Augusta Gregory, Kate O’Brien, Somerville and Ross, Anne Enright, Claire Kilroy, Belinda McKeon, and Eimear McBride. Students will complete a series of short responses, write a symposium presentation, and complete a final essay.

Experiential in the Major

ENGL 3381 – Diversity and Inclusion: The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing in a Transnational Context – Service Learning

Instructor: Professor Belinda Walzer
CRN: 17466
Sequence: *NEW TIME* 2 (9:15-10:20AM MWR)
Attributes: 

How does the study and practice of writing differ across contexts – international, institutional, and/or individual? How does the globalization of higher education impact the courses that almost all students must take at almost all US colleges – the writing course? How does this impact the work that tutors do in a Writing Center? This course takes up the scholarship and conversation around the teaching of writing to engage with these questions and more. This course also offers students an opportunity for a service-learning practicum to work in a local writing center and prepares students for future tutoring in the Northeastern Writing Center or teaching. Students will gain deeper insight into their own writing processes by writing in a variety of genres, conducting primary research, responding to readings, and reflecting on experiences. ENGL 3381 satisfies the experiential learning and writing-intensive requirement for English majors and is a great option for Writing minors and Rhetoric minors.

 

Capstone

ENGL 4710.01 – Capstone Seminar: *NEW* Opening the Archive

Instructor: *NEW* Professor Marina Leslie
CRN: 10494
Sequence: B (2:50-4:30PM MW)
Attributes:

This course is designed to introduce students to amazing archival institutions of the Boston area and to offer training in the materials and the methods of primary source research.  We’ll be taking field trips to Boston Public Library, the Massachusetts Historical Society, and the Houghton, Harvard’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library to get hands-on exposure to their collections of rare and historically significant books, pamphlets, letters, broadsides, diaries, advertisements, scrapbooks, maps, etc, while in class we will be using Shakespeare’s Tempest as a test case for tracing how historical sources get used and adapted by the playwright and how his play in turn becomes the basis for historically significant adaptations in England, American, and the Caribbean. We will discuss the theory and practice of archival research through short, guided assignments, culminating in an independent research project of your own design.  This course is ideal for students considering graduate level study of English, potential librarians or archivists, or for any major who is excited about the possibility of doing original research.

ENGL 4720 – Capstone Project

Instructor: Professor Patrick Mullen
CRN: 18297
Sequence: D (9:50-11:30AM TF)
Attributes:

Offers students an opportunity to design, develop, and complete a major intellectual project in a workshop setting. Students must enter this course with an approved project and the support of a faculty member in the relevant area of study. In addition to producing original research, offers students an opportunity to contextualize their work in relation to their focus within English studies, their experience of the major, and their intellectual and professional goals.

Fall 2017 English Courses by NUCore, NUpath

NUCore

NUCore

Capstone

ENGL 4710 – Capstone Seminar (see Capstone)
ENGL 4720 – Capstone Project (see Capstone)

Comparative Study of Cultures

ENGL 2455 – American Women Writers (see Comparative)
ENGL 3676 – Representing Gender in Literature: Irish Women Writers (see Comparative)

Experiential Learning

ENGL 3381 – Diversity and Inclusion: The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing in a Transnational Context – Service Learning (see Experiential Learning, Theories and Methods, and Writing)

Humanities Level 1

ENGL 1160 – Introduction to Rhetoric: The Great Debates (see Foundational and Theories and Methods)
ENGL 1450 – Reading and Writing in the Digital Age (see Comparative)
ENGL 1502 – American Literature to 1865 (see Comparative)
ENGL 1600 – Introduction to Shakespeare (see Literary Periods)
ENGL 1700 – Global Literatures to 1500 (see Foundational)

Math/Anly Think Lvl 2

Writing-Intensive in the Major

ENGL 1400 – Introduction to Literary Studies (see Foundational)
ENGL 4400 – Opening the Archive (see Comparative and Experiential Learning)
ENGL 3381 – Diversity and Inclusion: The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing in a Transnational Context – Service Learning (see Experiential Learning, Theories and Methods, and Writing)
ENGL 4710 – Capstone Seminar (see Capstone)

NUpath

NUpath

AD = Analyzing and Using Data

ENGL 1450 – Reading and Writing in the Digital Age (see Comparative)
ENGL 2150 – Literature and Digital Diversity (see Theories and Methods)

CE = Demonstrating Thought and Action in a Capstone

ENGL 4710 – Capstone Seminar (see Capstone)
ENGL 4720 – Capstone Project (see Capstone)

DD = Engaging Difference and Diversity

ENGL 1700 – Global Literatures to 1500 (see Foundational)
ENGL 2150 – Literature and Digital Diversity (see Theories and Methods)
ENGL 2455 – American Women Writers (see Comparative)
ENGL 3676 – Representing Gender in Literature: Irish Women Writers (see Comparative)

EI = Exploring Creative Expression and Innovation

ENGL 2700 – Creative Writing (see Writing)

EX = Integrating Knowledge and Skills Through Experience

ENGL 3381 – Diversity and Inclusion: The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing in a Transnational Context – Service Learning (see Experiential Learning and Theories and Methods)
ENGL 4400 – Opening the Archive (see Comparative and Experiential Learning)

IC = Interpreting Culture

ENGL 1160 – Introduction to Rhetoric: The Great Debates (see Foundational and Theories and Methods)
ENGL 1450 – Reading and Writing in the Digital Age (see Comparative)
ENGL 1502 – American Literature to 1865 (see Comparative)
ENGL 1600 – Introduction to Shakespeare (see Literary Periods)
ENGL 1700 – Global Literatures to 1500 (see Foundational)
ENGL 2455 – American Women Writers (see Comparative)
ENGL 3676 – Representing Gender in Literature: Irish Women Writers (see Comparative)
ENGL 4400 – Opening the Archive (see Comparative and Experiential Learning)

ND= Engaging with the Natural and Designed World

SI = Understanding Societies and Institutions

ENGL 1160 – Introduction to Rhetoric: The Great Debates (see Foundational and Theories and Methods)
ENGL 1502 – American Literature to 1865 (see Comparative)
ENGL 1600 – Introduction to Shakespeare (see Literary Periods)

WI = Writing Intensive in the Major

ENGL 1400 – Introduction to Literary Studies (see Foundational)
ENGL 1450 – Reading and Writing in the Digital Age (see Comparative)
ENGL 3381 – Diversity and Inclusion: The Practice and Theory of Teaching Writing in a Transnational Context – Service Learning (see Experiential Learning and Theories and Methods)
ENGL 4400 – Opening the Archive (see Comparative and Experiential Learning)
ENGL 4710 – Capstone Seminar (see Capstone)

Upcoming Course Offerings

Spring 2018 (subject to change)

The following information is subject to change.

For the most up-to-date and comprehensive course schedule, including meeting times, course additions, cancellations, and room assignments, refer to the Banner Class Schedule on the Registrar’s website.

For curriculum information and basic course descriptions, see the Undergraduate Full-Time Day Programs catalog, also on the Registrar’s website.


Foundational

  • ENGL 1400 – Introduction to Literary Studies
  • ENGL 1700 – Global Literatures to 1500

Literary Periods – Early Literatures

  • ENGL 1600 – Introduction to Shakespeare
  • ENGL 4000 – Topics in Early Literatures: Greek Tragedy

Literary Periods – 17th-18th Centuries

  • *Added 5/25/17* ENGL 4010 – Topics in 17/18 Century Literature: Becoming Human

Literary Periods – 19th Century

  • ENGL 2320 – Nineteenth-Century American Novels 1

Literary Periods – 20th-21st Centuries

  • ENGL 3685 – From Kafka to Kushner: Modern and Contemporary Jewish Literature

Comparative

  • ENGL 2450 – Postcolonial Literature
  • ENGL 2510 – Horror Fiction
  • ENGL 2690 – Boston in Literature
  • Cancelled 5/25/17 ENGL 3426 – Literature and Politics

Theories and Methods

  • ENGL 3340 – Technologies of Text
  • ENGL 3700 – Narrative Medicine
  • ENGL 4410 – Research in Rhetoric and Writing

Writing

  • ENGL 2770 – Writing to Heal
  • ENGL 3378 – Fiction Workshop
  • ENGL 3380 – Topics in Writing
  • ENGL 3382 – Publishing in the 21st Century

Diversity

  • ENGL 2450 – Postcolonial Literature
  • ENGL 3685 – From Kafka to Kushner: Modern and Contemporary Jewish Literature

Experiential in the Major

  • ENGL 3382 – Publishing in the 21st Century

Capstone

  • ENGL 4710 – Capstone Seminar
  • *Added 5/25/17* ENGL 4720 – Capstone Project