Home » Graduate Program in English » Fall 2016 Graduate Course Descriptions

Fall 2016 Graduate Course Descriptions

Fall 2016

The following information is subject to change. For the most up-to-date and comprehensive course schedule, including meeting times, course additions, cancellations, and room assignments, visit the Registrar’s website. See Banner Class Schedule for ENGL 9990 Dissertation and ENGL 9996 Dissertation Continuation CRNs.

For curriculum information, see the Program Guides.

Courses by Curriculum Area

Proseminar

Professor: Laura Green

CRN: 12324

Sequence: Mondays, 3:30 p.m.

Additionally fulfills: N/A

Description:
Introduces the history and current scholarly practices of English studies. Surveys theoretical, methodological, and institutional issues in the development of the discipline; introduces students to the research of the English department’s graduate faculty; and offers opportunities for the practice of key components of scholarly production, including formulating research questions, using databases, conducting literature reviews, and writing and presenting scholarship in common formats other than the long research paper, such as conference proposals, oral presentations, and book reviews.

Theories and Methods courses

Professor: Erika Boeckeler and Ryan Cordell

CRN: 17715

Sequence: Wednesdays, 2:50

Additionally fulfills: N/A

Description:
What is a book? This class introduces you to the major stages in the creation, production, and cultural life of books through the ages, and thinks through the future of books in today’s world of new media. We will ask and answer questions like: Does it matter that people in the past read “the same” books we read today but in vastly different forms? What relationship is there between the technical, economic, and social conditions of books’ creation and the way scholars interpret them? How did early printers print illustrations; how did they print in color?  How do we decide which from the multiple authoritative versions of Shakespeare’s Hamlet is the “real” play? If Shakespeare had nothing to do with printing who were Shakespeare’s invisible collaborators? What is the future of books in a digital age?

To begin answering these and other questions, you will learn to identify and interpret key features of books and manuscripts through hands-on experiences with works from the medieval to the modern in archives and special collections. Course topics include: bibliography (the art of book description), format throughout the ages, publishing and audiences, typography, modes of illustration, seriality, the circulation of books, cutting and pasting, non-book printing and non-paper texts, maps, digitization, electronic literature. Students will gain fluency in the key debates in Book History over: how book and media technology change perceptions of language, how scholars can (or should) model “print culture,” and how the social dimensions of books affect our reading. Through these debates, we will trace the evolution of Book History from a marginal discipline to its current, central role within literary studies.

Professor: Julia Flanders

CRN: 15058

Sequence: Tuesdays, 3:30

Additionally fulfills: DH certificate requirement

Description:
This course offers an intensive introduction to the tools, methods, and intellectual history of the domain now known broadly as digital humanities. We’ll begin with a critical orientation to the field that considers its various myths of origin and definition exercises and what they have at stake, and we’ll ask what we seek from the field and its distinctive competencies. The remaining units of the course will be structured around three core concepts: data, tools, and work. In each unit we’ll investigate how digital humanities distinctively re-imagines and repositions these concepts with respect to the humanities, through a combination of readings, discussion, and practical exploration. Students will come away with a well-grounded understanding of the overall landscape and a set of foundational skills that will support their future research projects. The course assignments will give students both practical hands-on experience and opportunities for critical reflection, and will include experiments in data creation and manipulation, reflective essays, and a grant proposal.

Medieval Through Early Renaissance courses

Professor: Marina Leslie

CRN: 17714

Sequence:Tuesdays, 6:15

Additionally fulfills: WGSS certificate elective

Description:

If early modern print culture were to be believed, the period experienced an unprecedented wave of female criminality and sexual deviance.  Early modern pamphlets and dramatic literature sensationalized the dark deeds of female infanticides, prostitutes, bawds, husband murderers, and sodomites, with many of these stories supposedly “ripped from the headlines” of published news accounts, court records, and so-called scaffold speeches. But understanding the relationship between fact and fiction is a complex affair in assessing criminality in the period.  As just one example, it was widely believed that there was a widespread network of professional thieves who spoke their own language of “cant,” and one could read numerous accounts of the highly specialized crimes they perpetrated broken down by rank and gender, along with the titles they held in this anti-society.  And while these accounts are no longer believed credible, they were so often reprinted and reproduced in various forms that they became an undisputed “truth” cited as a justification for a series of judicial and legislative responses. Indeed the truth claims of these accounts remained unchallenged until the twentieth century.

This course will embrace the seeming oxymoron evoked by the phrase “culture of crime” to tease apart the intersecting discourses that link the aesthetic (e.g. high vs. low culture), the political (e.g. theories of social contract), and the social (e.g. the changing situation of working women) in order to examine the contemporary understanding of—and response to—early modern criminality.  We will read canonical works such as Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure, Dekker and Middleton’s Roaring Girl, and Middleton and Rowley’s The Changeling, alongside contemporary documents that supplied and contributed to the voracious popular appetite for true crime narratives, some of which, like the autobiography of the cutpurse Mary Frith or the “popish midwife” and alleged explosives provider, Elizabeth Cellier, come from the accused criminals themselves.  Readings from Foucault, Frances Dolan, Laura Gowing, and others will help us outline a theoretical and historical context for the shifting attitudes about the discipline and punishment of gendered crimes in the early modern period.  Requirements will include an archival project and presentation (with traditional and digital options) and a final seminar research paper.

Rhetoric or Composition courses

Professor: Ellen Cushman

CRN: 15408

Sequence: Thursdays, 3:30

Additionally fulfills: N/A

Description:
This class introduces students to the study of literacy and literacies in a range of theoretical, social, and institutional contexts. We will explore interdisciplinary perspectives on what counts as literacy as this has come to be defined and redefined in scholarship, policy, and practice. Along the way we’ll trace the mutually sustaining relationships between literacies, power, culture, and the expressive tools people use to make life meaningful in and on their own terms.

We’ll explore a range of questions including, but not limited to:

• What is literacy and who gets to decide?
• Where are literacies practiced, by whom, and under what conditions?
• What are the technologies of literacies and how has this changed over time?
• How are literacies learned, taught, and legislated?
• How and where are literacies contested?

Readings will include: a selection of essays from the 2nd edition of Literacies: A Critical Sourcebook; several book-length studies; research articles from key journals in the area; as well as a handful of seminal essays in decolonial theory, critical pedagogy, and qualitative studies of literacy research. An array of assignments is offered to support your development of a professional dossier of teaching materials, papers for presentations, and/or digital media projects; as well as a proposal and seminar paper.

NULab Research Seminar - 1 SH

Professor: Julia Flanders

CRN: 17330

Sequence:Mondays, 2:00-3:00 (tentative)

Additionally fulfills: DH certificate requirement

Description:
Note: Three INSH 7910 enrollments satisfy one MA Elective.

This workshop course supports the project development component of the certificate in Digital Humanities, aimed at graduate students enrolled in MA and PhD programs in humanities and social sciences. Students in the course will engage in a sustained, interdisciplinary exploration of digital humanities methods and projects as they plan and develop their own research projects during their progress on the certificate. As needed, the course will also organize working groups on special topics to cover additional skills and methods. The course is designed to be taken in successive years by students in the certificate program, but may also be taken on its own. No prior technical experience or familiarity with digital humanities or digital tools is required, but participants should be prepared to identify an area of research interest that is connected in some way with the general domain of digital humanities, computational social science, and related fields.

Upcoming Course Offerings

Spring 2017 (subject to change)

Last updated 03-08-2016

Proseminar

  • N/A. See Fall 2016.

Theories and Methods courses

  • ENGL 7213 Topics in Early American Literature: Print and Performance in the Atlantic World, Professor Elizabeth Maddock Dillon – 3 SH

Medieval Through Early Renaissance courses

  • N/A. See Fall 2016.

17th Century/Restoration/18th Century courses

  • ENGL 7213 Topics in Early American Literature: Print and Performance in the Atlantic World, Professor Elizabeth Maddock Dillon – 3 SH

19th Century/20th Century courses

  • ENGL 7214 Topics in Nineteenth-Century American Literature: Emerson, Thoreau, and Fuller, Professor Theo Davis

Rhetoric or Composition courses

  • ENGL 7392 Writing and the Teaching of Writing, Professor Chris Gallagher
  • ENGL 7395 Topics in Writing: Genre, Professor Mya Poe

NULab Research Seminar

  • INSH 7970 NULab Project Seminar, Professor Julia Flanders – 1 SH
    Note: Three INSH 7910 enrollments satisfy one MA elective.