Research Seminars

Spring 2017

February 8
12:00pm-1:15pm


316 Lake Hall
Bernhard Ganglmair Bernhard Ganglmair is an
Assistant Professor of Finance and Managerial Economics at University of Texas-Dallas and is currently a visiting lecturer at Northeastern University.
Prof. Ganglmair will be presenting his paper, Learning When to Quit (joint with Timothy Simcoe and Emanuele Tarantino). Link to paper

Bernhard Ganglmair received a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Zurich, Switzerland, in 2011. During that time, he was a Research Associate at the Institute for Empirical Research in Economics at the University of Zurich (2008 - 2010), a Non-Resident Research Affiliate at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in Bonn, Germany (2007 - 2010), and a visiting PhD student with the Chair of Intellectual Property at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zurich (2009 and 2010). In 2010, Bernhard was appointed Assistant Professor of Managerial Economics at the Naveen Jindal School of Management, University of Texas at Dallas, where he is also an Affiliated Faculty of the Center and Laboratory for Behavioral Operations and Economics (since 2012). He visited the University of Bologna (2012) and the University of Haifa (2014) as visiting researcher. In 2015, he was visiting lecturer at the University of Linz. In 2016, Bernhard visited the Economics Department at Boston University.
February 23
12:00pm-1:15pm


316 Lake Hall
Resul CesurResul Cesur, Assistant Professor at the University of Connecticut will be presenting his paper "The Impact of Genetic Diversity on Religiosity: Evidence from the Exodus of Homo Sapiens out of Africa"

Abstract: This study is the first to investigate the impact of genetic diversity on conceptions of god, regulation of religion, and piousness of individuals. To address the endogeneity of genetic diversity, we use migratory distance to East Africa as the source of identifying variation. Results based on ethnographic data show that societies with a greater degree of genetic diversity are more likely to believe in supernatural powers imposing moral values. Using cross-country data sets on social and formal regulation of religion, we find that genetic diversity causes an increase in the likelihood of societal, and governmental regulation of religious activity. Finally, analysis using survey data documents that individuals living in diversely populated countries are more likely to become a believer, report being pious, and exhibit a greater degree of religious participation in terms of attending the place of worship, and self-prayer. This research establishes that genetic diversity has been fundamental in determining religious beliefs and practices as well as making religion a central component of social interaction.
March 2
12:00pm-1:15pm


316 Lake Hall
Ian Wright Ian Wright, Visiting Lecturer in the Department of Economics at Northeastern University, will be presenting his paper, "Stationary Points for Parametric Stochastic Frontier Models" (coauthored with William Horrace). .
Link to paper.



Ian Wright‘s primary research and teaching interests are theoretical and applied econometrics and international trade. He coauthored a paper with William Horrace and Seth Richards-Shubik, “Expected Efficiency Ranks from the Parametric Stochastic Frontier Models,” published by Empirical Economics in 2015. Wright received an alternate, honorable mention Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship in 2014.

March 13
12:00pm-1:15pm


316 Lake Hall
Erick GongErick Gong is an assistant Economics professor at Middlebury College.
March 23
12:00pm-1:15pm


420 Shillman
Hong LuoHong Luo is an Assistant Professor of Business Administration in the Strategy Unit at Harvard Business School. She teaches the Strategy course in the MBA required curriculum.
March 30
12:00pm-1:15pm


316 Lake Hall
Peter NewberryPeter Newberry is an Assistant Professor of Economics at The Pennsylvania State University. His fields are industrial organization and applied microeconomics. His research is primarily focused on the role of information in online markets.

Prof. Newberry is currently on leave at the Business Economics and Public Policy department at The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania for the 20016-2017 academic year.
April 6

12:00 pm - 1:15pm

316 Lake Hall
Eric Edmonds6Edmo ndsEric Edmonds is Professor of Economics at Dartmouth College. Professor Edmonds' research aims to improve policy directed at child labor, forced labor, human trafficking, youth migration, and human capital in poor countries.

Current projects include a study of a debt-bondage system in Nepal, an effort to provide life skills training to middle school age girls in Rajasthan, and an evaluation of the government of the Philippines principal anti-child labor program. A frequent advisor on issues related to child and forced labor in the global supply chain, he currently serves on advisory panels for the U.S. Department of Labor, the International Labor Organization’s Understanding Children’s Work project, the GoodWeave Foundation, and the National Academy of Science, Engineering, and Medicine.

Edmonds is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge MA, a Senior Fellow at the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development, a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor, and Editor of World Bank Economic Review. AT Dartmouth, he created the curriculum in development economics, teaches Economics 24 and 44, and is the faculty lead for the Human Development Initiative.


April 10

12:00pm-1:15pm


316 Lake Hall
Raquel Fernandez

Raquel Fernandez is a Professor in the Department of Economics at NYU. She is also a member of ESOP at the University of Oslo, the NBER, the CEPR, and IZA. She has previously been a tenured professor at the London School of Economics and Boston University and held visiting positions at various institutions around the world. She has served as the Director of the Public Policy Program of the CEPR and has been a Panel Member of the National Science Foundation and a Program Committee Member of the Social Science Research Council. She has also served as Co-Editor of the Journal of International Economics and as an Associate Editor of the Review of Economic Dynamics and of Economia.


Currently she is on the Executive Committee of the Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association and an advisor to the World Bank's WDR on Gender Equality and Development. She is the recipient of several NSF grants, of a Spencer Fellowship from the National Academy of Education, and was awarded a National Fellow at the Hoover Institute and a Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation. Her most recent research is primarily in the areas of culture and economics, development and gender issues, inequality, and political economy.


Fernandez received a B.A. Magna Cum Laude in Economics from Princeton University in 1981, and a Ph.D. in Economics from Columbia University in 1988.

April 20

12:00pm-1:15pm


316 Lake Hall
Chiara Farronato
Chiara Farronato, Assistant Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School will present her paper, "Market Structure and the Entry of Peer-to-Peer Platforms: the Case of Hotels and Airbnb" (coauthored with Andrey Fradkin) this Thursday, April 20, at noon in 316 Lake Hall.


In her research, Professor Farronato focuses on the market design of peer-to-peer online platforms. Her work has been cited by media outlets including Bloomberg Businessweek, The Huffington Post, The Economist, and FT Magazine.

Professor Farronato received her PhD in economics from Stanford University. She earned an MSc in economics in a joint program of Bocconi University in Italy and the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium; her bachelor’s degree is also from Bocconi University.