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Course Offerings

Spring 2018

Please find our Spring 2018 course offerings listed below.

Course Offerings

African Studies

Professor: Kwamina Panford

CRN: 37170

Days, Time: MWR, 9:15 am – 10:20 am

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Uses a multidisciplinary approach to offer an introduction and overview of the geographical, demographic, socioeconomic, and political conditions of the African continent, emphasizing sub-Saharan Africa. Africa, “the cradle of humankind,” is a vast, complex continent of diverse peoples that has fascinated observers and evoked multiple images. Topical areas of interest range from ethnic relations, politics, colonial experience, and international relations to religion, environment, health, economic development, gender, culture, and literature. Course materials aim to provide contemporary African perspectives and analyses that offer students an opportunity to acquire and interpret broad knowledge about the continent. Click here for more information.

Professor: Richard Wamai

CRN: 35427

Days, Time: TF, 1:35 pm – 3:15 pm

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Introduces global health in the context of an interdependent and globalized world focusing on four main areas of analysis: infrastructure of global health; diseases; populations; and terms, concepts, and theories. While the focus is on lower-income countries, the course examines issues in a broader global context, underscoring the interconnections between global health disparities and global health policy response. Applies case studies describing interventions to improve healthcare in resource-poor settings in sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere to help illuminate the actors, diseases, populations, and principles and frameworks for the design of effective global health interventions. Cross-listed with PHTH 1270.

Professor: Kwamina Panford

CRN: 36034

Days, Time: MW, 2:50 pm – 4:30 pm

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Offers a basic survey of the latest innovations and cultural and socioeconomic trends of 21st-century Africa. Examining the political transformations of 54 nations, the course focuses on a culturally and ethnically diverse continent of five regions, linguistic and religious diversity, and tribal societies reflecting an ancient triple heritage—indigenous, Arab, and European. Presents complex and critical perspectives on topics including governance and civil strife, gender empowerment, the impact of globalization, trade and investment developments, public health challenges, the visual and performing arts, identity formation among a rising youth demographic to pervasive mobile technology, food security, and the new “African” passport. Click here for more information.

Professor: Richard Wamai

CRN: 37171

Days, Time: WF, 11:45 am – 1:25 pm

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Examines the epidemiology and determinants of diseases and the public health practice among continental African peoples and African-derived populations in the Americas and elsewhere in the African Diaspora. Emphasizes such epidemic diseases as malaria, yellow fever, tuberculosis, smallpox, the current AIDS pandemic, obesity, and cancer. The course also aims to critically address the breadth of factors behind these pandemics, such as socioeconomic, political, health system, behavioral, and genetic. A cross-cutting theme throughout the course is the entrenched health disparities in society.

Professor: Kwamina Panford

CRN: 35790

Days, Time: MR, 11:45 am – 1:25 pm

Pre-requisites: Must be Sophomore, Junior, or Senior

Description: Examines the social dimensions of resource extraction. Focusing mainly on developing nations, studies global issues, including developments in industrial nations, to assess their impact on resource extraction and living and working conditions in resource-rich regions. Uses case studies of key countries producing oil/gas, minerals, and forest/agricultural commodities to illustrate the past/current causes of resource mismanagement; their social consequences; and how public policies, legislation, and financial and human resource management with industrialization can be used to avert or reduce the adverse effects of resource extraction, especially in poor countries. Click here for more information.

African-American Studies

Professor: Eric Jackson

CRN: 31539

Days, Time: MR, 11:45 am – 1:25 pm

Pre-requisites: Not open to students who have taken MUSC 1104

Description: Explores the various musical traditions of African Americans, with a specific focus on the United States. Examines the impact of African, European, and Native American traditions on African-American music as well as the role of music as an expression of African-American aesthetics, traditions, and life. Considers historical and contemporary forms of African-American music, with selected video presentations.

Professor: Gia E. Barboza

CRN: 32653

Days, Time: MWR, 9:15 am – 10:20 pm

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Explores how and why there is poverty, how it affects people’s lives, and how it can be eliminated. Examines the relations between poverty, racial and ethnic factors, and the economic, political, and administrative systems. Evaluates a number of alternatives and provides an opportunity for clarifying individual assumptions and feelings about poverty.

Professor: Gia E. Barboza

CRN: 37168

Days, Time: MR, 11:45 am – 1:25 pm

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Explores the dynamic changes experienced by black communities in the United States since the civil rights era in the 1950s and 1960s. Includes discussions and applications of key concepts and methods in several fields of the social sciences, and seeks to understand the relationship of race, class, gender, and social change in addressing the current search for policies and programs for community development.

Culture Studies

Professor:Holbrook Robinson

CRN: Section 01: 31386 / Section 02: 35428

Days, Time: Section 01: MR, 11:45 am – 1:25 pm / Section 02: MW, 2:50 pm – 4:30 pm

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Examines the rich interconnections between literature and language and the culture that supports them. Discusses the relationship of language to literature and investigates how language and literatures are embedded in culture. Addresses several very broad and important questions, such as the relationship between language and culture; the relationship between language and thought; the definition of cultural relativism; and how ethical dilemmas are expressed in different cultures. Explores the relationship of esthetic and rhetorical traditions in given languages to the culture from which they sprang. In this context, examines the extremely interesting case of American Sign Language and how a gestural language sheds light on these issues.

Professor: Philip Thai

CRN: 34953

Days, Time: MWR, 10:30 am – 11:35 am

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Introduces modern Chinese history and culture through literary works, films, and historical texts. Examines political, social, and cultural changes in China since 1800: the decline of empire; the New Culture Movement of the 1920s; the rise of nationalism and rural revolution; the changing roles of women; the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s; and China’s cinematic, literary, and economic engagement with the world since 1978. Taught in English and open to all undergraduates. CLTR 1500 and HIST 1500 are cross-listed.

Professor: Alice L. Sedar

CRN: 35616

Days, Time: MWR, 10:30 am – 11:35 am

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Offers a very broad introduction to French “culture,” by which is meant its principal “high” and “low” versions. An attempt is made to reproduce the knowledge base of a typical well-educated French man or woman. Highlights sports, politics, history, intellectual history, and the arts. Also addresses questions of cultural relativism. Students write a major paper on a subject chosen in conjunction with the professor.

Professor: Shakir Mustafa

CRN: 37399

Days, Time: M, 11:45 am – 1:25 pm [hybrid course]

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Designed to provide students with an in-depth survey of Arabic culture. Familiarizes students with the roots of one of the richest and oldest cultures but also seeks to satisfy their curiosity concerning certain social norms, patterns, and cultural traits in contemporary Arabic societies. Examines cultural manifestations ranging from the hijab (head covering), Jihad (holy struggle), human rights, polygamy, gender relations, public behavior, and many others by providing the historical backgrounds for these customs and traditions as well as exploring how they are now perceived in various Arab societies as well as in the West. Seeks to provide students with an appreciation for this multifaceted culture but most importantly a broad perspective on Arabic culture within the context of the universal human experience.

Professor: Luigia G. Maiellaro

CRN: 35617

Days, Time: MR, 11:45 am – 1:25 pm

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Examines chronologically the main aspects of Italian culture, concentrating on the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the modern, post-unification period. Topics include art, philosophy, literature, architecture, film, and historical background. Other topics address significant personages in Italian culture, such as Dante, Boccaccio, Piero della Francesca, Leonardo da Vinci, Alberti, Pico della Mirandola, Michelangelo, and Machiavelli; the differences between northern and southern Italy; and the nature of Italy’s cultural heritage and its influence and status today. Conducted in English.

Professor: Barbara Corbett

CRN: 35431

Days, Time: MWR, 10:30 am – 11:35am

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Examines chronologically the forces that have forged Spanish culture and have made Spain the nation it is today. Traces the development of Spain from the prehistoric caves of Altamira to the present. Observes past and present concerns such as divorce and abortion in a Catholic country, education, the role of women, linguistic diversity, separatism and terrorism, and the incorporation of Spain into the European Community. Incorporates history, sociology, anthropology, geography, economics, and politics. Conducted in English.

Professor: Alan West-Durán

CRN: 35496

Days, Time: MR, 11:45 am – 1:25 pm

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Introduces students to Latin American culture through the study of a broad array of literary and critical writings by Latin American authors and selected films from Latin America. Authors include Sor Juana, Garcia Marquez, and Jorge Amado. Conducted in English.

Professor: Jennifer Cullen

CRN: 35433

Days, Time: TF, 9:50 am – 11:30 am

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Provides an introduction to Japanese popular culture through critical analysis of mass media such as film, television, comics, and animation. Investigates various social and cultural issues, such as gender, family, and education. Films and videos supplement readings. Conducted in English.

Professor: Alice Sedar

CRN: 3380

Days, Time: MW, 2:50 pm – 4:30 pm

Pre-requisites: FRNH 2102 or FRNH 2302

Description: Designed to provide students with an overview of French culture with a particular focus on its rich artistic heritage as manifested down through history and in popular culture today. Includes such areas as language, art, architecture, cinema, music, literature, urban and landscape design, fashion, folklore, rites, rituals, and customs. Studies the distinctive characteristics of France’s many regions in light of their contributions to the vast tapestry that comprises French culture. Conducted in French.

Film Studies

Professor: Jose Buscaglia

CRN: 35429

Days, Time: MW, 2:50 pm – 4:30 pm

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Examines prizewinning Latin American films based on actual events, such as those that occurred during the Argentine military dictatorship of the 1970s, or works of fiction by well-known authors, such as Nobel Prize winner Garcia Marquez. These films ably depict the history and culture of these countries. Conducted in English and the films are in Spanish with English subtitles.

Professor: Jennifer Cullen

CRN: 37172

Days, Time: TF, 11:45 am – 3:15 pm

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Provides an introduction to Japanese film through works by such great masters as Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, and Ozu, as well as works by new directors from the 1980s and 1990s such as Tami, Morita, and Suo. Studies both form and content; relates major works to Japanese culture. Conducted in English.

Professor: Alan West-Durán

CRN: 35433

Days, Time: MW, 2:50 pm – 4:30 pm

Pre-requisites: N/A

Description: Introduces the study of world cinema from the past several decades as a form of artistic and cultural expression. Emphasizes the way that different ethnicities and cultures mix and even clash within national boundaries. Readings cover such topics as the postcolonial inheritance, immigration, the boundaries of class, the pressures of modernization, ethnic identities, and historical memory. Examines storytelling in its multicultural aspects and deals with the diverse influences of entertainment cinema and art cinema, as well as measures taken by countries to limit the influx of foreign films in order to protect their own cultural productivity. One overall concern of the course is the place of film in contemporary global culture.

Literature Studies

Professor: Barbara Corbett

CRN: 37175

Days, Time: MWR, 1:35 pm – 2:40 pm

Pre-requisites: SPNS 3101

Description: Offers an overview of the major trends in Latin American literature, from Bernal Diaz through Borges and Vargas Llosa. Studies broad cultural and political contexts, especially the effect of colonization. Conducted in Spanish.