Introduction

Northeastern attracts students and faculty who believe in experiential learning, a cornerstone of what it takes to succeed in different cultures and with people from different cultures.

Our students are going out into the world, and the world is coming to us. Opportunities for study abroad–from the award-winning, faculty-led Dialogues of Civilization to the successful and pioneering NUin program for freshmen, from course-based service learning trips to traditional study abroad—involve more and more students. International and out-of-region co-ops are on the rise. In all, 3,252 undergraduates had a global learning experience in 2014-2015; since 2006, Northeastern students have worked or studied in 131 different countries.

Our reach has expanded dramatically beyond our Boston campus. Northeastern has become a destination of choice—the sixth-ranked institution in the United States in 2014-2015–for international students. The campuses of the Northeastern University Global Network (NUGN) in Charlotte, Seattle, Silicon Valley and Toronto project the University’s identity nationally and globally.

CURRENT STATE MAP

Questions for Discussion

  • How can we take fuller advantage of our increasing global standing?
  • How can we more fully integrate the activity and outreach of the campuses beyond Boston—with one another, as well as with the mother ship?
  • What roles could the campuses of the Global Network play in undergraduate education? In doctoral education?
  • How can Northeastern better showcase our global and cross-cultural opportunities to attract more culturally agile students and faculty?
  • Whether in existing programs or in new programs, can Northeastern be doing more to help students and faculty further develop their cultural agility?
  • How can we reach our goal of ensuring that 100% of our undergraduates participate in a global experience?
  • Should Northeastern become the world leader in demonstrating the learning outcomes achieved through our students’ global experiences and by our international students?
  • How can we realize fully the global dimensions of our research themes in health, security and sustainability? Are there other university-level research areas in which we are (or could be) contributing to meeting global challenges?
53 responses on the “The Global University
  1. What if Northeastern did this to expand its global interests on campus and abroad? In an effort to make Columbia University more global, Columbia President Lee Bolilnger awarded “17 first-year students in Columbia College to received the 2016 Presidential Global Fellowships.” The undergraduates will spend the summer overseas conducting research in their area of study. “The students, whose academic interests range from French to Portuguese, from Arabic to Chinese, from anthropology to art history, and from political science and human rights to sustainability, were selected.” In addition to the Presidential Global Fellowships, President Bollinger also implemented a university wide Global Course Requirement – Soon to be a two seminar requirement that delves deeply into global texts, cultures, beliefs, and traditions.

  2. Globalizing a university isn’t easy. It’s a major undertaking. It’s also a process. And, there will be all kinds of growing pains experienced. In light of this, it’s more than fascinating what’s going on at Columbia University right now. I think Northeastern can benefit immensely from what the university is going through, in terms of trying to globalize.

    Columbia’s Global Core – University President’s effort to globalize Columbia.

    When students were asked what they thought of Columbia’s Global Core, most students surveyed responded that it wasn’t worth their time. However, students recommended that the Global Core, a 2 lecture requirement, be converted into seminars, that are inherently more rigorous, more active, and more dynamic. The faculty agreed that this could be the solution.

    The idea behind Global Core is to get students engaged with primary texts of different regions of the world, and an understanding of different beliefs, and cultures. And a seminar would put more responsibility on the students with regard to class participation in every class.

    “We know when you have the opportunity to… formulate your own ideas and listen to your peers’ ideas and to react to those ideas, you remember them much more than having one person tell you things…”

    “I think seminars are really one of the highlights of being at Columbia, and having a relationship with your professor…”

    “Needless to say, both faculty and students are in favor of introducing more discussion-based seminars that delve deeply into specific cultures…”
    – Columbia community

    One purposed solution to increasing the man and womanpower to staff these expanding Global Core seminars, is to expand postdoctoral fellows to support these new courses. There would also be a new training program implement to help create more texturally based Global Core seminars around each professor’s area of expertise.

  3. The number of international students that are attending schools in the United State is just growing, and that is something that the educational institutions have to take advantage of. The integration of these international students in the school community is essential and very beneficial in ensuring that undergraduate students are participating in global experiences. This way, students have opportunities to interact and get involved with an another student from a different country, that has a different culture, therefore taking advantage of every opportunity they have to participate in worldwide experiences. Also the programs that are already offered in northeastern are very helpful in making the undergraduate population to participate in international experiences, like the study abroad program, summer programs and international co-ops opportunities. But becoming a global university does not depend of Northeastern alone and what it offers, one the biggest part on making Northeastern global depends on their students getting involved and taking advantage of every opportunity Northeastern has to offer. Some programs like clubs and on-campus activities should be done focusing in getting international students more involved in the community, therefore making them more interested in the programs that Northeastern has to offer and then making the University

  4. Cooperative education started at the university level over a century ago and has emerged as a powerful and influential learning method that combines classroom learning and world practical experience (Stein). The program is not about securing a job but an approach that enhances professional, intellectual, and career growth for university students after graduation. At the university, students are prepared to make use of skills and knowledge to perform tasks and activities which they are unfamiliar with in varied environments and various parts of the world. Besides, the Co-op program, we think that it would be prudent for the university to accompany theoretical knowledge with practical research that would prepare students to tackle the world’s problems when they get opportunities to serve in various fields. Also, the university should work with other institutions and use its resources to spearhead cultural integration among all students and the faculty. Furthermore, the university should focus on making more cultural events that gather students from different cultures to ensure that they contribute to enhance unity around the campus and beyond. Besides that, International students can play a big role in marketing the university back in their countries. Moreover, the university’s alumni should advertise the name of the university by solving world problems in their workplaces. We believe it would be good if Northeastern University emphasized the need for global network and global experience as both will provide students with a myriad of opportunities to put their ideas into actions.

    Stein, Maria. About. Northeastern University. Northeastern.edu. n. d, n. p. 19 Mar. 2016.

  5. Having diversity on campus does not make the university global, unless students take advantage of the opportunities. Some students tend to stay in their comfort zone and refuse to explore outside their community. Northeastern should consider having international students more spread out on campus. The school should assign students to different residential halls, making sure that each building would have a mix of domestic and international students. Both international and domestic students could benefit from the mix of different cultures. The university should encourage their students to get more involved in the school community, or even host mandatory events that bring all the students together to interact with each other.

    Northeastern University provides overseas co-ops and studying abroad opportunities that could help the students to gain actual experience on their field of major while exploring different cultures. However, some students are not taking advantage of these opportunities offered by the University; less than one-fourth of undergraduate students participated in oversea co-ops in 2015. Northeastern should take action in encouraging their students to make use of these resources and opportunities. Faculty members should set up one on one meeting with students and introduce them to opportunities that are available. Clubs and associations should invite former students as guest speakers to share their experience and how they benefited from these program. Northeastern University has increasing global standings, but we need the students to actually take advantage of these opportunities, in order for Northeastern to be truly globalized.

  6. Northeastern University offers many different programs and opportunities that allow its students to explore all parts of the world. Their goal is for all students to have at least one global experience, however it is not possible to ensure that all of the undergraduate students participate in it. Having said this, there are many things that Northeastern can do to motivate its students to do so. One of them is to expand the global experience program by advertising it more and creating more connections with universities all over the globe; the other one is to convey the advantages of going abroad.
    First of all, Northeastern could advertise their available programs a lot more, through e-mail and on signs around campus, to inform students that studying abroad enriches, not only their personal experiences, but their understanding of the world. Additionally, Northeastern should take advantage of its well-known co-op program and use this to send more students abroad. NEU could also start thinking about creating more connections with different colleges around the globe. By doing this, more options are going to be available to students when it comes to choosing where to study abroad, meanwhile this motivates more students to embrace this opportunity and actually decide to go abroad. We, international students, get the sense that most of the students that go abroad are actually international students because we are already outside of our home country so we are already predisposed to experiencing other cultures. Perhaps, NEU should develop more programs and core classes to inform those who live in the United States about all of the different opportunities that studying abroad can offer them and, in this way, motivate them to explore a different culture. All in all, Northeastern University should start emphasizing the need of enhancing their global network and experience given that both will provide students with a myriad of opportunities and motivations.

  7. there are plenty of people talking about building another campus oversea, but some people do not think it’s a good idea. On the one hand, establishing a campus outside of the US will increase the amount of students that study abroad as well as international students coming in. On the other hand, building another campus would cost a lot of money and time before NU really benefits from it.Therefore, here are a few other things that Northeastern can do while they are building another campus outside USA (if they want). Northeastern can recommend that students do summers abroad, or do their core curriculum outside of the United States, so every student is not only eligible, but also be recommended to go on a program like that. Additionally, Northeastern can send students abroad for their co-op. Northeastern has most of its focus for career development in the Boston area. By sending students abroad they will slowly create a network and a good reputation for Northeastern abroad in many countries that it doesn’t have now. For example, the co-op students or those students who serve as volunteers abroad could improve NU’s reputation by helping local people using their ability and intelligence. Besides, NU can fund some merit scholarships oriented for international students, hence NU could make it more accessible for more international students. Those are just a few steps Northeastern can take to become more global, before establishing a new campus abroad.

  8. The number of international students that are attending schools in the United States is just growing, and that is something that the educational institutions have to take advantage of. The integration of these international students in the school community is essential and very beneficial in ensuring that undergraduate students are participating in global experiences. This way, students have opportunities to interact and get involved with an another student from a different country, that has a different culture, therefore taking advantage of every opportunity they have to participate in worldwide experiences. Also the programs that are already offered in Northeastern are very helpful in making the undergraduate population participate in international experiences, like the study abroad program, summer programs and international co-ops opportunities. But becoming a global university does not depend of Northeastern alone and what it offers; one of the most important methods of making Northeastern global depends on their students getting involved and taking advantage of every opportunity Northeastern has to offer. Some programs like clubs and on-campus activities should focus on getting international students more involved in the community, therefore making them more interested in the programs that Northeastern has to offer and then making the University more global when its students have multiple international experiences. In our point of view, Northeastern University already has almost everything that it needs to be the most global university across the globe, now it only depends of the student to take advantage of this programs and opportunities.

  9. “Singapore’s first liberal arts college, Yale-NUS College, “a community of learning, founded by two great universities, in Asia, for the world”, draws on the heritage and expertise of Yale University and the National University of Singapore (NUS) to re-imagine liberal arts and science education.

    At the heart of the Yale-NUS experience is a common curriculum covering the social sciences, humanities and natural sciences. In addition to their area of specialisation, students explore Aristotle and Confucius, Cicero and Sun Tzu, and a full range of ancient, historical and contemporary knowledge from throughout human societies.

    Faculty members draw lessons from the diverse intellectual traditions and cultures because no one person, discipline or culture has all the answers. This curriculum is combined with an immersive residential college experience that fosters the ability to analyse issues, reflect critically, solve problems and communicate effectively.

    These skills, and others such as emotional intelligence and cognitive flexibility, need frameworks that involve deep and broad understanding of global and local complexities, as well as a spirit of collaboration, cultural understanding and respect, to be truly effective.

    In learning coding, for instance, the idea is to look beyond acquiring a technical skill and at nurturing problem-solving abilities based on algorithms, technological awareness, sensing where the business trends are, as well as the ability to weigh in on ethical discussions such as privacy. Only then can universities and the talent they nurture truly hope to influence the future.

    The response to the college has been impressive: In its first three application cycles, Yale-NUS attracted more than 30,000 highly qualified applicants from around the world – less than 5 per cent of whom could be admitted.

    This confirms what both Yale and NUS believed from the outset of our planning less than a decade ago: There is a hunger throughout the world, and in Asia, for a holistic and innovative liberal arts and science education that draws from both the East and the West.”

  10. 1. globe-oriented in research
    There are many important global issues such as climate change, environment protection, and refugee’s migration waiting for solutions in the modern society. To exerting NU’s influence in globe, it is very necessary to focus its research on those issues and make effort to build NU’s contribution in global affairs.
    2. globe-oriented in faculty hiring and students admission.
    NU’s work on admitting and cultivating international students is significant and productive. It improves NU’s international influence and enhances cultural diversity in NU community. However, only international students is not enough. Our faculty community also need diversity. Supposing that NU’s students are from all over the world but the majority of faculty is still American, so the education the students received is still American style. Therefore, to build a global university NU not only needs diversity in students but also requires diversity in faculty.
    3. globe-oriented in campus distribution.
    At the present time, all NU’s campuses are located in USA. To promote academic and cultural communication, NU should consider founding a campus overseas. It would be an important step for NU on the course of improving its global influence.

  11. 1. What do we mean by a “global university”? I think of it as deepening NU geographically along four dimensions:

    (i) globalizing of our student body;
    (ii) globalizing experiential learning;
    (iii) globalizing knowledge creation/dissemination, i.e. faculty, research, and curriculum,
    (iv) globalizing our physical presence, which can help with the first three dimensions.

    These dimensions reinforce one another to make the whole greater than the sum of the parts.

    2. How can we integrate emerging markets into our view of “global” in each area? (Yes I am biased!). 85% of the world’s population lives in emerging markets, they represent the greatest opportunities for fighting poverty, they account for 2/3 of world GDP growth, and they offer incredible opportunities for breakthrough innovations. Can we do more in emerging markets along each dimension of globalization?

    a. Student body: Emerging markets already account for most of the international students coming to NU. I was surprised to discover, for instance, that we have 1,100 students from PRC (not counting students of Chinese origin from other countries), including over 500 in DMSB. How can we do more to integrate these students into mainstream campus life in Boston? Can we do more to attract quality applicants of lesser means from these countries?

    b. Experiential learning: Hordes of our students already flock to emerging markets to help fight poverty, but could we partner with key schools in these countries to offer more study abroad opportunities, and, most importantly, create new coop opportunities with MNCs and local firms? Globalizing coop would cement NU’s distinctive competence and differentiate NU in its second century like few other initiatives.

    c. Knowledge creation/dissemination: Incorporating emerging markets into all aspects of our faculty/research/curriculum will not be easy, because so many disciplines are US-centric. This matters less in the hard sciences (“physics is the same everywhere”) but matters more in the “soft” sciences. Moreover, globally, the social impact of new insights in the soft sciences can vastly exceed that of new insights in the hard sciences, especially in emerging markets, where even well-known ideas are not adopted in practice. Consider the important role of emerging markets in our three thrust areas:

    –Healthcare: less than 5% of the people in India have access to quality healthcare; innovations in health care delivery can do more to improve quality of life in poor countries than breakthroughs in medical procedures, medicines, or medical devices. Emerging markets are also the #1 likely source of pandemics. As others have suggested below, NU must expand its focus to global health, not just US health
    –Security: the greatest threats to physical security (terrorism) or cybersecurity come from emerging economies. I have not worked in these areas but would think that our view of the topic must go beyond technological solutions to political/social solutions, supported by research of faculty in CSSH, LS, DMSB, etc.
    –Sustainability: similarly, the greatest polluters in the world are China (and soon, India), but they are also some of the most active supporters of renewable energy (solar, wind). if we think of sustainability as inclusive growth, then too the challenge is most serious in emerging economies. Businesses have a key role to play in all of these areas (DMSB)

    In summary, I guess I am arguing for horizontal axis (i.e. geographic, especially emerging markets), driven by the soft sciences, that cuts across our three vertical areas of research. Research into the soft sciences may have less potential for external research funding (in absolute $ terms) but its social bang-for-the-buck can be huge. If we can help create that knowledge—and, just as important, bring new insights from soft sciences into our core curriculum, our products (degrees, certificates) in DMSB, CSSH, LS, Bouve, etc. would be much more relevant, innovative, and fresh than those offered by other universities.

    d. Physical presence: Should we open satellite campuses in key emerging markets, such as China (or Hong Kong), India, Brazil, South Africa, etc.? We already have

    The Center for Emerging Markets (CEM) has made modest contributions in some of these areas since 2007, but a lot more can and should be done in our next 10-year plan.

    1. Ravi Ramamurti raises the idea of creating CO-OP opportunities and educational experiences in countries that lack the strength to grow economically, politically and socially. Some might ask why students would want to CO-OP in a place like this. It is very simple: creating a connection with different cultures and applying the knowledge acquired in class to help and solve different issues in such countries like Haiti, Sierra Leone, and Honduras will be an enriching experience for the student. Additionally, there is so much potential in terms of research in third world countries that not only the student may benefit from it but also the country itself. If students decide to travel to a dangerous zone to do their CO-OP, then the university would have to research those areas and designate certain areas for students to be able to explore and ban them from the dangerous zones. Moreover, Northeastern should join with other universities or companies, and get more insights from locals. The university could build research groups with foreign institutions, and then students would get opportunities to research on specific fields or solve problems abroad like the alarming amount of pollution in China. Northeastern could send a group of students there to help figure out the cause and find a solution to water pollution in a specific city. By doing these kinds of projects in different cities around the world, Northeastern could become a world leader in demonstrating the learning outcomes achieved through our students’ global experiences. These continued relationships with other parts of the world and effort to combine theory and practice to help other nations, rather than just working in a regular job as in other CO-OPs, will increase the university’s global standing.

  12. (1) Too often faculty, staff and students are unaware of existing relationships NU has around the globe. When traveling to Africa, Asia, Europe, South America, it might be worthwhile for our community members to have a resource to check to see if there are NU contacts existing in that City or Country, instead of relying solely on our individual network.
    (2) I believe that every NU student should have a required minimum 2 week dialogue international experience.
    (3) Latin/South America seems under appreciated with many of our programs. I believe we could develop stronger cross fertilization to the south.

  13. How can Northeastern better showcase our global and cross-cultural opportunities to attract more culturally agile students and faculty?
    Perhaps more joint ventures with schools across the world. Regular and continuous research and teaching projects with universities in the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Latin America. One solid source of the kind of students and faculty NU is looking for is the world beyond the U.S., and one solid way of showcasing the kind of global school NU is, it to demonstrate on the ground to world audiences why coming to NU will be productive.

    1. There were many supporting comments along these lines in the February 17 discussion in the Faculty Senate, including:
      “Interweave teaching, research and outreach [by finding] global partners with similar strengths and missions”
      “University partnerships–focus on key strategic partnerships to build global presence”
      Establish “joint centers with other foreign universities (? China, Korea, UK, Germany, etc)”

    2. One idea for increasing the faculty’s global experience that earned a lot of support in the Faculty Senate’s February 17 discussion of the academic plan: “a Teaching Sabbatical to encourage abroad exchange.”

      In some fields, Fulbright fellowships for doing this are abundant and we could be taking better advantage of using those programs to support and extend sabbaticals. In other areas, this could be connected with forging broader and stronger partnerships with selected other universities.

  14. • How can we take fuller advantage of our increasing global standing? 
    >> The University must endeavor to engage more systematically and deliberately abroad. This entails having real operational relationships and presence on the ground in various parts of the world to serve as platforms for the academic and service enterprise. We cannot be a global university without having institutional relations and presence in the developing world. This means the University must create centers for research in all the strategic areas: global Health, global Sustainability, global Security. How can the University understand what health, security and sustainability complexities face communities in, say Mali, Kenya, Nepal, Brazil, Zambia, or Haiti without true on-the-ground institutional presence? These centers would serve faculty and students by providing all the experiential opportunities for not just one project by programmatically through multi-year investments. For example, a Global Health research site would mean collaborative structures with local universities, hospitals and other health facilities, local communities and local leaders, and installing facilities including housing for researchers and students, labs and supplies and a target and patient population. Setting up a global Health site abroad is an inexpensive exercise and is doable with multiple counties in which the University already has MoUs (Memoranda of Understanding) with such as Kenya and Ghana. And there are already on-going existing research and students’ experiential programs in these countries on the three University global foci, and particularly global Health. There are also proposals and budgets ready to be submitted if there is real interest to see explore these ideas <> Setting global research centers abroad will further raise the profile of the University in these settings that will attract students and create opportunities for our students and faculty <> Students want to have global health experiences. And presently there are opportunities through the fantastic co-ops and Dialogue of Civilization programs as well as study abroad. These should be expanded to regions of the world that are at the frontlines of the challenges the University wants to address, i.e., global Health, global Sustainability, global Security. Students would benefit from integrated education platforms that enable students to spend time at established Centers for Research in the developing world focusing on these broad questions. <> Absolutely. There needs to institutional investment at the University by strategically and deliberately funding the establishment of a Global Health Center that will spur global health programming. There is no academic enterprise in the US or elsewhere that does global health without academic Centers that focus on that in competitive and programmatic research as well as teaching, service and training. Global scholarship and impact does not just happen. Administrative structures must be created for these purposes. Proposed programs of study should also be fast tracked. For example, there is a proposed Global Health Minor that is awaiting approval. Such curricula and other programming that creates global opportunities for students and faculty must be given critical attention <<

  15. One way to ensure a stronger “intégration” of international students is to adopt a Mentor program.
    An international Freshman should be given the opportunity/incentive to choose an American Sophomore/Middler as a mentor. Such an approach would accelerate and facilitate their integration by eliminating a number of perceived obstacles in reaching out to other students.
    Such an approach/program should be made possible by granting mentors some form of “Cultural Agility” Credits and I am sure they would learn quite a bit from their mentee too.
    I also think all international Freshmen (Honors or not) should reside in Dorms, with no single room allowed, except for medical reasons. This the best way for individuals to mix, share and open themselves especially in their first year. If that exposure is missed, it is very unlikely to happen in upper classes.

    1. There was strong support for a similar idea generated in the Faculty Senate’s February 17 discussion of the Academic Plan–our vision is that “International students here integrate with domestic students to create global student experience here at NU.” These are great concrete ideas for making that vision real.

  16. Why is Global Student Success not listed on the “current state map”? This department offers faculty and staff webinars on issues facing our international population, and also runs a highly effective language hub for international students. While it falls under CPS, it serves all international students on campus. It’s rather surprising that that department was overlooked.

  17. Q) How can we more fully integrate the activity and outreach of the campuses beyond Boston—with one another, as well as with the mother ship?

    Q) What roles could the campuses of the Global Network play in undergraduate education? In doctoral education?

    Q) How can Northeastern better showcase our global and cross-cultural opportunities to attract more culturally agile students and faculty?

    Q) Whether in existing programs or in new programs, can Northeastern be doing more to help students and faculty further develop their cultural agility?

    Q) How can we reach our goal of ensuring that 100% of our undergraduates participate in a global experience?

    Q) Should Northeastern become the world leader in demonstrating the learning outcomes achieved through our students’ global experiences and by our international students?

    A: In addition to partnering with international institutions to develop Global Network, it is now time for Northeastern to look inside within its own “mother ship” to utilize the existing resource by embracing the rich cultural diversity to integrate international population within the community in order to truly “deepen diversity” on our campus.

    According to the annual report released by Institute of International Education, roughly 975,000 international students studied at U.S. colleges and universities in 2014-15 year alone, and U.S. News & Word Report ranks Northeastern University the tenth in its number of international students.

    Speaking multiple languages, greater intercultural knowledge across disciplines, and cultural and political awareness were mentioned as required skills to become more successful in the work force/market during the Town Hall discussion on January 25th.

    To “deepen diversity”, Northeastern will need to take an inclusive approach through “mutual engagement” as the university President Aoun has previously addressed.

    To better showcase how global Northeastern is, I am advocating a need for “pipeline” to connect our rich international student population – who are rather marginalized on campus – with domestic students to promote cross-cultural opportunities. This approach will mutually benefit domestic as well as international students to develop their cultural agility and also “ensure that 100% of undergraduates participate in a global experience” starting from our own community.

    At the Town Hall discussion held on January 25th, a current domestic student shared with us that there are domestic students who may not be able to afford abroad experience and who are eager to connect with international students on campus.

    Mary Loeffelholz invited to share what we are currently missing from the “Global” tab at https://www.northeastern.edu/academic-plan/strategic-themes/the-global-university/ toward the end of Town Hall discussion.

    We’re missing CURRENT international student population in the picture – who constitute 15 percent of our community – and we need a cultural platform to take a radical yet inclusive approach.

    Northeastern can become the leader in demonstrating learning outcomes for domestic and international students by integrating the diversity in the mother ship. I spoke to Kate Ziemer briefly before the Town Hall discussion, and I am eager to contribute my ideas in terms of curriculum development for 2 particular Strategic Themes: Global University and Diversity & Inclusion. If the committee is interested in hearing more ideas, please contact Michelle Park at w.park@neu.edu.

    1. Yes–many at the Town Hall last week pointed to global experience on campus as something we need to integrate better: the experience of our international students here, their interaction with US students, their common preparation in Boston-based classes as well as in campus life for still other experiences beyond this campus, the integration of global experiences with a more fully global curriculum, the awareness of students here that they are for a time members of what are already global neighborhoods and communities in Boston.

  18. For international students, “global” means exploring the communities surrounding Northeastern.
    For domestic students, “global” means exploring the global communities surrounding Northeastern – the diversity in Roxbury, Mission Hill, etc. is astounding and NU is doing more to push it away than encourage students to ethically engage with the surrounding areas.

    As we prepare students for Service Learning classes, volunteering, and working locally, there needs to be a common ground for ALL students (especially those outside of CSSH, who don’t talk about privilege, race, or class regularly). A mandatory “course” for freshman could prepare all students for this type of truly global work – whether they leave Boston or not.

    1. I completely agree – most international students come to the campus and remain in their own little bubbles with little engagement of the Boston community as a whole. The university can greatly expand on their interactions with the community, particularly in terms of the large international population attending programs in CPS.

      1. I trust it is critical that international students who are selected to join Northeastern University are individuals looking much beyond accumulating academic knowledge.
        Too many international students refrain from mixing with other international students let alone mixing with American students on Campus.
        The value of having International students is to ensure a sharing of experience both ways as they give and receive.
        The profile of international students (language, inter communication skills, outgoing personality,..), not just their academic capabilities, is a clear requirement for an optimal sharing on campus, in classes and residences.

  19. Has the idea of alternative Spring Breaks that are not just volunteer oriented been discussed? Perhaps a tour of several companies/countries/specialties within given majors or even specific classes. These trips can be less costly than a dialog and the goal would be a survey opportunity for students exploring various fields within their discipline. Other universities do this with their graduate students who are working professionals and typically only have a week of vacation at a time. This is easily applicable to our global NU students who are seeking a non-traditional Spring Break experience.

  20. I think one important voice is missing from this discussion – it is an input from Employers. University should try to better understand today’s challenges faced by global companies caused by globalization and try to bridge these gaps by offering the solutions in form of new courses and researches. They need to be focused, practical and relevant.

    The most important goal of the university remains to prepare students for the global workplace. In my opinion, the focus should be not on global experiences but rather on specific global skills which will distinguish NEU students on the job market and help them with their careers. Historically, the biggest strength of NEU was in its connection with the employers and its ability to adapt to the evolving needs of workplace. NEU should build on this strength.

    Curriculums should be regularly updated with the courses to address current gaps in the skills needed in the constantly changing workplace. Identifying the list of specific challenges faced by today’s global companies could give some very good ideas for prospective courses and research topics. Identifying these new global challenges and complexities could be a topic of a research on its own.

    I think NEU should offer classes and/or labs re-creating real global work environment – having students working in distributed team across the campuses, assuming cross functional roles by assigning different majors (Marketing, Finance, Project Management, etc.) working together on projects, using real remote collaboration and communication tools, negotiating and providing real deliverables to the simulated (or not) customers, located overseas or local business. Student from graduate and undergraduate schools could work together on these projects practicing different levels of subordination. Professors of different disciplines could work together with industry professionals and small businesses to create these state of art academic experiences. Students and professors could compile and analyze their individual Lessons Learned and maybe even come up with new methodologies to address challenges faced by today’s managers. Despite of administrative complexity of this vision it can be implemented in incremental steps overtime.

    It would be very beneficial to the students and to the faculty to have more culturally agile guest speakers from the industry to honestly share their views and firsthand experience of globalization – their successes and failures. Maybe they even can be invited to teach 1 credit labs for some specific topic of their choosing (knowledge they lived through). They should get more involvement in discussions like this one.

    Globalization brought all new additional set of challenges to never fully studied and addressed topics like failed cross functional co-leadership or gender inequality…. For example, topic of the research can be to come up with methodology to eliminate corporate hypocrisy and create objective performance evaluation metrics to bridge gender inequality gap in compensation and global opportunities to female culturally agile professionals.

    NEU need to pioneer more honest discussions in each class and not shy away from presenting multiple opinions on painful controversial topics whether it is business or politics. University need to teach students the skill to work with those of drastically different views and still be able to create great things together. Future leaders have to be able to actively listen the opposite side and to be open to change their perceptions based on new information. They need to learn how to compromise to achieve the bigger picture goals. World would be a better place if leader of all walks would become more open minded and tolerant and learned to collaborate with respect despite of their differences.

  21. As Northeastern thinks about expanding globally, I truly hope NU does not include international campuses for undergraduates as a part of its international strategy. While I was living overseas in London, I met many Americans who were being taught there by their American faculty. These students were isolated on their American campus in London surrounded by other Americans. They were in an American bubble so they didn’t mix effectively with the native culture. This is a poor educational and cultural experience. The American students in London were also extremely ignorant of the host culture and in many ways arrogant because they were pro all things American. What Northeastern should do is build better and stronger partnerships with universities overseas so our NU students are fully integrated into the host culture. This in itself is a superior educational and cultural experience.

    1. Cannot agree more.
      Strong partnership with Global universities is absolutely critical. Not only will it allow NU students on exchange to learn more on all fronts while overseas but also it will attract foreign International students on exchange programs at NU. That way, more Global talents will bring their experience to the campus.
      Given NU ranking and reputation, time is right to seek partnership with best global universities around the world.

  22. Northeastern has taken a leadership role with the establishment of satellite campuses. Indeed, one question is how do we best leverage these growing extensions of our community. Certainly there are many conceptual overlaps with each campus. The high-tech sector of Silicon Valley shares many research and academic interests with our hub in Boston. Also, California is closer to Asia which could serve as a meeting and collaboration point for programs and researchers. We have started initial discussions about the possibility of offering a Center for Emerging Markets event in California. Other boutique or company-specific programs could be created.
    To the question of how do we assure that 100% of students go on an international experience the answer is quite clear I believe: We must be flexible with trips of different durations, we must offer a wide range of options (places and topics), and when necessary we must subsidize students who do not have the resources to pay the additional fees. A lofty goal but we can do it!

    1. Great ideas that move towards answering a question raised in the Faculty Senate’s February 17 discussion: “other schools have remote campuses; what is unique” about Northeastern’s approach?

  23. One of the main reasons I came to Northeastern 7 years ago was because of the way it focuses on globalization. This focus takes many forms and pervades the student and faculty life here at NU. I think the tone is set at the top and thus, my first comment is to continue to stress this message of the importance of globalization at NU in all of its forms.

    Second, words must be followed up by actions. Right now NU does an excellent job in taking action to support and encourage the globalization perspective. Whether it is through financial resources, program design, incentives, etc.–NU stands behind this push.

    That is where we are today. The question is what to do tomorrow. One of the hallmarks of success is imitation. Many of NU’s unique aspects that pertain to globalization are being copied (or others are at least attempting to copy them). I think where we need to focus is on continuing to be innovative and flexible to make unique opportunities possible for students and faculty.

    On the student side, just about everyone does a study abroad program or programs similar to the Dialogues. I think these programs are great and we should certainly continue them. But these programs may not work for all students. Thus, I think we need to look for other avenues. For example, shorter more focused opportunities. For example, can we develop 1 credit intensive courses that are taught in 1 week periods, say during Spring Break, or right after classes before Summer 1? Students could take several of these in different foreign locations throughout their studies. We could also leverage our existing satellite campuses as well as other partnerships we have. These would be great opportunities for students to get additional experiences in other cultures. They also may appeal to students who do not or cannot partake in a study abroad program.

    Another consideration is to expend additional resources to strengthen the number and variety of international co-op opportunities. One of the best ways to develop global perspective is to be immersed in another culture. Our students could really benefit from more international co-ops.

    From a faculty perspective, it would be great to provide greater flexibility and develop more opportunities for faculty to spend meaningful time in global locations. I have had the chance to do so over the past few years and it’s impact on me professionally in the classroom has been incredibly valuable. It also motivates me to work harder to get my students such experiences. Many faculty cannot spend an entire semester or year abroad. But shorter 2-3 week opportunities would benefit existing faculty and attract new faculty.

    We are doing a great job here at NU in instilling the global perspective in our students. The next steps involve less traditional approaches that may require changes to administrative processes to create greater flexibility for students (and faculty). I know in D’Amore-McKim, the things we are doing now are greatly enhancing our reputation internationally. It is vital to continue this trajectory.

  24. Q: How can we more fully integrate the activity and outreach of the campuses beyond Boston—with one another, as well as with the mother ship?

    A: Satellite campuses in various domestic and foreign locations are key for expanding Northeastern University’s global outreach and brand recognition beyond New England. This strategy could be strengthened by increasing the extent to which the home and satellite campuses leverage capabilities from each other. Leveraging of existing home campus’ core competencies for the benefit of the satellite campuses could translate, for example, into more opportunities for Boston-based faculty to visit the satellite campuses for teaching- and research-related purposes. Also, the use of advanced telepresence technology could bring local expertise from satellite campuses to NU’s home campus through lectures and workshops for Boston-based students. Telepresence could also be used to create “global classroom” experiences involving Boston-based faculty for students at our different satellite campuses. This strategy is being successfully used by other top business programs in the country. Further, the creation of additional satellite campuses in key “hot” locations (e.g., Rome, Hong Kong) could strengthen our ability to service our NU students that are already spending time in these locations through coop, study abroad, and expatriate year opportunities.

    1. I agree strongly with Valentina. We have had some of the satellite campuses for while now and we need to be a a lot more active than we have been to engage the companies in those areas to do applied, use-inspired research on their global issues. We could offer to make presentations at those companies as part of the outreach/marketing effort. In addition, there is no reason not to use technology/telepresence to include students in those areas in our current graduate classes in Boston thereby increasing graduate enrollments.

  25. Should Northeastern become the world leader in demonstrating the learning outcomes achieved through our students’ global experiences and by our international students?

    Totally and absolutely should! and I would love to be a brand ambassador for this! I have immensely gained from my course at Northeastern and from studying and living in the US and being able to be part of the International Study tour. Alot of the outcomes are not quantifiable nor could I pen them dow; but when I speak to anybody about the experiences I had; I could go on forever!
    The undergrads and MBA’s have a great chance to take up international co-op’s, and through other programs like semester abroad, exchange programs, IPBS affiliation and IFS etc- a vast majority of the students can take part in one of these.
    Even studying with IPBS students from Europe was a great learning and enriching experience; not just for me, but for them aswell!

    – One observation I made was, a vast majority of American people are not exposed to the ‘globe’ ; and to do that, one or more of these international opportunities should be made mandatory. And as someone also posted- help them in flights, accommodation etc. They will come back culturally enriched and will by default become spokesmen for NeU’s programs.

    – Could look into blogs, video blogs etc etc by students and broadcast them globally.

    – Would also suggest looking to the CEMS global partnership – currently for the Americas region, there are only 3 countries (Brazil, Canada and Chile) which have 1 partner school each. Can tap into the global student pool as well as the amazing corporates which are a direct partner of this course!

    – The alum groups (especially international) should somehow be energized and made more active. While I understand it can be time consuming and everyone is busy with their lives; need to come up with fun, not time intensive, quick and easy methods to increase engagement and spread the Husky spirit!

    1. CEMS Global Partnership is now a must for DMSB. It means belonging to the global network of top Universities/Business schools around the world hence creating world class exchange programs for NU students (receiving full credits) and welcoming top foreign students on NU campus. A win-win situation.
      I do believe also that tying an study exchange with a co-op is a great way to leverage fully time spent in a given country.

  26. How can we take fuller advantage of our increasing global standing?

    While Northeastern has being skyrocketing in global standards; I was very dis heartened by the career services provided by the college (business school in particular). NeU is known for its corporate connections with regards to the Co-op program but I, along with many other students feel that , that is where the association stops. The reasons given to me for not having career services were unacceptable. Also, due to old rules not being revisited, certain courses are singled out into not receiving access to career services until 9 months into their 1 year MS course. While MS courses are still new and upcoming and not that popular in the US, they are globally very popular in Europe and Australia- there needs to be a bit more emphasis on these courses.
    Awesome and uniform career services across all courses will definitely help NeU gain higher international standards as exciting career opportunity stories will resonate around the globe.

  27. How can Northeastern better showcase our global and cross-cultural opportunities to attract more culturally agile students and faculty?
    For starters- should limit the number of students based on ethnicity in courses. For eg. Ms Finance had about 50 students from China and 3 from India. While i understand this is also based on applications received; maybe NeU could market their Ms courses as much as the MBA and Undergraduate. S
    The IPBS MIM association is a good step in getting cross cultural students into one classroom! Was a great experience being part of that- however, especially for the MSIB program full time students- there should also be more emphasis on having more full time students for the MSIB program who study along with the IPBS students. – Cross cultural experience here was great, can definitely be used as a leverage to attract cross cultural students and faculty.
    The International Field Study was fantastic – It could also be made an integral part of other courses. Just as northeaster is known for its Co-op program; this could become a great add on to programs as well. Not just for marketing; but the experience gained out of this is soo immense and beneficial!

  28. Many students are given the opportunity to study abroad, but for majors with strict prerequisites and class orders, they are inevitably set back or have to be in school longer. The university should make a solid attempt to make studying abroad plausible for all majors.

    1. totally for this! many students dont opt for the optional programs coz of the added costs and the minimum grade requirement.
      To make students culturally agile and expose them to the world; I feel it is wrong to restrict them on the above grounds, especially grades! As for the financial part goes, make it a 2-3 credit mandatory course and adjust the cost (like the IFS costs) in the tution fee and let more students be able to go for international tours.
      More students signing up also means that the overall costs can be negotiated and the college and students could get a better deal! win-win for all!

  29. I’m a northeastern alumn from CAMD working in international rights management in the music industry. I took many international courses but wasn’t in the business school. My two recommendations are to promote an international ciriculum in all schools–learning the rules and standards in the U.S. alone has become irrelevant in an interdependent world and students with a global background will ultimately be the thought leaders. As far as outreach, the alumni outreach program could attract more support and engagement if the outreach was personal and done by professors and advisors who they’ve interacted with. Emails and postal mail will inevitably be ignored.

  30. Northeastern has several programs offered outside of the US. We do excellent work in teaching and the programs themselves are beneficial personally and professionally to the students. Where we can do better, however, is to ‘bring’ Northeastern to these locations so that the students have a better sense of place which then assists in our students becoming Northeastern’s global ambassadors.

    1. This is exciting, offering our vision of experiential learning around the globe. I agree that NEU should have a strong community for both the students and faculty, offering a holistic NEU experience. We want to ensure students feel they are part of NEU, whether they are learning online or on a campus. I believe faculty also have responsibility in creating the NEU learning environment. How is NEU preparing our faculty to embrace the multi-cultural and cross-generational student bodies, along with enhancing the learning environments at all campuses?

  31. How can we take fuller advantage of our increasing global standing?
    Establishing new programs in foreign countries and creating satellite campuses in emerging economies (e.g., Turkey, Brazil, South Africa, India, Mexico, China) to reinforce the global image and expand our current influence.
    Creating programs for alum to reconnect with them, especially those outside the US

    How can we more fully integrate the activity and outreach of the campuses beyond Boston—with one another, as well as with the mother ship?
    Taking Northeastern Students to foreign campuses as part of their education (especially if we create campuses in emerging economies).
    Creating cross-campus projects for students to know and work across distance on projects (e.g., social impact, development, …)

    What roles could the campuses of the Global Network play in undergraduate education? In doctoral education?
    In undergraduate education they could be the basis for short-term visits abroad. They could serve as sources of students for graduate programs. They can help project the image of a global university (if the campuses are global).
    In doctoral education they could be the basis for data collection abroad.

    How can Northeastern better showcase our global and cross-cultural opportunities to attract more culturally agile students and faculty?
    Advertise in international high schools in foreign countries
    Establish more joint degrees with foreign universities
    Revamp the website and providing additional information

    Whether in existing programs or in new programs, can Northeastern be doing more to help students and faculty further develop their cultural agility?
    Require a foreign language and foreign experience (month, summer, semester, coop…) as part of the regular education
    Provide self-assessment and training on how to deal with people from other countries and backgrounds

    How can we reach our goal of ensuring that 100% of our undergraduates participate in a global experience?
    Make it a requirement of their study programs.
    Include costs as part of regular tuition
    Establish different levels of global experience (summer month, semester, coop
    Require learning a foreign language
    Require participation in a social impact project to broaden the mindset

    Should Northeastern become the world leader in demonstrating the learning outcomes achieved through our students’ global experiences and by our international students?
    Yes, given that we are already are at the head in terms of the number of international students

    How can we realize fully the global dimensions of our research themes in health, security and sustainability? Are there other university-level research areas in which we are (or could be) contributing to meeting global challenges?
    Implement these in emerging economies to address the particular challenges that countries with low levels of infrastructure development and challenging regulation and political systems create on these themes.
    Focus on economic development in emerging markets and the social impact of education on the world.

    1. setting up satellite campuses in different countries is a good idea and well explored idea by numerous colleges. Being from one of the countries you have listed above; I want to add a few points on this.
      1. More often than not, this effort gets drifted into a monetary effort where getting student admissions and financial gains become the main motto. And they start to compromise on student and faculty quality but still provide world class facilities to keep everyone enticed.

      2. The students, while studying in an international university, have very limited international exposure, other than course material and style of teaching and upon graduation are 0% more cultural agile. There have to be solid programs where there is emphasis on international exposure!

      3. Students from emerging countries and economies also invariably end up getting targeted for admissions and being accepted (mother campuses in the US,UK etc) due to their ability to pay high tution fees and the overall cultural diversity of the classroom at the main campus goes down as the classes can become highly unculturally diverse.

  32. Northeastern University has a two-fold strategic advantage to become the world’s leading institution for building cultural agility.

    One, we attract unique and impressive students, those who want to learn through doing, who can tolerate ambiguity, and who more comfortably embrace change and complexity. They possess the exact traits that research has found enable people to succeed in different countries and with people from different cultures — the same traits needed to develop cultural agility.

    Two, our institution is unmatched in crafting global experiential opportunities. We can, with greater speed and ease, purposefully create high-quality development experiences to build cultural agility, a critical step. Having 100% of our Northeastern students gathering passport stamps is not enough to make them the culturally agile leaders we know they can be. From research, we know that the development of cultural agility occurs when people are placed in rich developmental experiences that provide: (1) cross-cultural novelty, pushing them to understand the importance of context and the limits of their knowledge, (2) stretch situations where they can challenge their expectations, (3) peer-level learning through meaningful projects with host nationals, (4) opportunities to practice unfamiliar culturally-appropriate behaviors, and (5) emotionally safe situations to make cultural some mistakes, receive feedback, and continually improve.

    I joined Northeastern University 2.5 years ago because I believe this institution has an inimitable ability to move the needle on developing cultural agility. To quote my 21 year-old, “we’ve got this”.

    1. To follow up on this comment, some faculty at DMSB have created programs that contribute to the development of a global mindset, global leadership and cultural agility that can serve as models and could be expanded or copied by other colleges. These professors may not feel comfortable “bragging” about their programs and posting information about them here – so I will do it for them.
      – Paula Caligiuri has created CALL (Center for Agile Leadership Lab): http://www.damore-mckim.northeastern.edu/business-community/executive-education/engagements/cultural-agility-leadership-lab/
      – Allan Bird has created Global ACE (Assessment Center for Global Effectiveness): http://www.damore-mckim.northeastern.edu/business-community/executive-education/engagements/cultural-agility-leadership-lab/
      – Dennis Shaugnessey with the Social Enterprise Institute has created a very successful program/dialogue in places such as in South Africa and India:
      http://www.damore-mckim.northeastern.edu/news/2013/09/sept-03-2013-students-help-african-business/
      http://www.northeastern.edu/sei/

  33. Q: Are there other university-level research areas in which we are (or could be) contributing to meeting global challenges?

    A: NU can do more to address the pressing issues of climate change and food security (not just anti-terrorism research) and incorporate these two themes into the University’s strategic themes. These issues are especially prominent in emerging markets and DMSB is well-known globally for its strong reputation in emerging markets research, so the emerging markets context can be leveraged and promoted better in my view, especially through our Center for Emerging Markets.

    Q: How can we more fully integrate the activity and outreach of the campuses beyond Boston—with one another, as well as with the mother ship?

    A: For example, there can be conferences for both faculty and students in each of the NU campuses once a year where participants exchange ideas and experience with local practitioners and other faculty and students from the other NU campuses on issues that are of particular relevance to practitioners in the local campus area. Another example is students from some of the NU campuses can come to the mothership in Boston and pursue a co-op, or work with faculty associates of our research centers.

    1. Climate change and food insecurity, especially in emerging markets–this sounds very exciting, especially with leadership from DMSB. Supply chains, markets, policy, governance connected with these issues seem to me real areas of opportunity for Northeastern, in DMSB as well as several other colleges.

  34. Northeastern has a highly recognized and successful international network that makes it one of the most influential universities in the world. The international experience that Northeastern offers provides students with a college experience that goes above and beyond a traditional university. Northeastern can use the international experience that current students are having to leverage Northeastern’s exposure worldwide. This could be done though the use of outreach and service events in the countries students are located as well as networking within these countries. In order to attract more international students to Northeastern I believe Northeastern could do more work networking with partner universities in other countries to gain insights into where their students come from as well as how the school structure works within their respective countries.

    In order to get more students to participate in study abroad I believe it is essential to show all of the cool and innovative opportunities students who are abroad are exposed to. This could be done through an email newsletter or student panels where students can share their abroad experiences and urge others to go abroad to have similar experiences. If Northeastern makes it easy for students to study abroad through providing students with housing, flights, and class schedules this will also ease students fears about going abroad. I also think it is essential to have more contact with students who are abroad. As an international business major I was provided with someone to contact with any issues and to just talk about my experience with. This Northeastern contact really helped me work through my issues and understand the emotions I was having living and working in a different country. I also believe it would be helpful to create groups for students who are in the same country so they can meet up and also discuss what is happening during their experience. This could be done via a web page or chat thread.

    All in all Northeastern does an amazing job at providing students with abroad opportunities, but I think they could do a better job at connecting students who are abroad to the Northeastern community while they are abroad as well as when they return to campus.

    1. This is a fantastic idea! Creating Northeastern country/city networking groups is a great idea! Instrumental, informational, and emotional support are fundamental for cross-cultural adjustment. These networking groups could provide all three.

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