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Current Visiting Scholars


Juli Grigsby

2014-2015 Visiting Scholar in WGSS
University of Texas at Austin

Biography:
Juli Grigsby is a doctoral candidate in Social Cultural Anthropology, African Diaspora Program at the University of Texas at Austin. She received her master’s degree from the University of Texas at Austin in Anthropology and her bachelor’s degree from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) In Chicana/o Studies and Anthropology. The past recipient of Davis Putter Fellowships and a Humanities, Arts, Science, Technology & Advanced Collaboratory Scholar (HASTAC) her photographic work has appeared in the Black California Dreamin’ journal and at the Metro Art Gallery in Pomona, California. Her current research project, Grim Sleeper: Gender, Violence, and Reproductive Justice in Los Angeles, explores black women’s experiences of structural violence through a form of racial neglect that over shadows their lived and material conditions that also reinforces activist black women’s commitment to social transformation and advocacy through reproductive justice.

Current Project
Grim Sleeper: Gender, Violence, and Reproductive Justice in Los Angeles


Banu Subramaniam

2014-2015 Visiting Scholar in WGSS
Associate Professor of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies
University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Biography
Banu Subramaniam is associate professor of Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is author of forthcoming, Ghost Stories for Darwin: The Science of Variation and the Politics of Diversity (Illinois University Press, 2014) and coeditor of Feminist Science Studies: A New Generation (Routledge, 2001) and Making Threats: Biofears and Environmental Anxieties (Rowman and Littlefield, 2005). Trained as a plant evolutionary biologist, she seeks to engage the social and cultural studies of science in the practice of science. Spanning the humanities, social sciences, and the biological sciences, her research is located at the intersections of biology, women’s studies, ethnic studies and postcolonial studies. Her current work focuses on the genealogies of variation in evolutionary biology, the xenophobia and nativism that accompany frameworks on invasive plant species, and the relationship of science and religious nationalism in India.

Current Project
In India’s Modern Temples: Science, Religion, and the Making of Indian Biologies