Academics



AcademicsOpportunities -  First-Year Seminar  -  Research Seminars -  Service-Learning
Undeclared students have access to the wide range of courses offered in all of the colleges across the University. Taking introductory courses in majors of possible interest, many of which are part of the NU Core Curriculum, is a wonderful way to begin to explore the disciplines, while taking advantage of the richness of Northeastern’s varied curriculum. We also offer multidisciplinary courses that have been specifically designed to provide undeclared students with opportunities to explore broad philosophical and practical issues/questions, to give students opportunities early in their academic studies to work closely with faculty and other students, and to both ask and answer the questions that matter in today’s world. In so doing, students are able to explore interests that may translate into academic majors or areas of study.

Some examples:

    • Why should the NU community care about sustainability?  And, if we do, what can we do to enhance current sustainability efforts?
    • What is the role of the University in promoting citizenship and social activism?
    • How might this extend to NU students and both our Boston and global communities?

Opportunities across the University

We encourage our undeclared students to pursue the rich and rigorous academic avenues available to them at Northeastern. The wide array of research opportunities, internships and co-op positions, local, national and international all play an integral part in the academic journey of an undeclared student.

The University expects all students to explore different disciplines as they fulfill the thought-provoking requirements in the NU Core. This ensures, for example, that a chemistry major will graduate not only with the depth of knowledge in science, but also with the breadth of knowledge of the social sciences, arts and humanities as well as the skills to think critically and analyze and synthesize information.  Capable advisors guide undeclared students to fulfill these NU Core requirements as the students take courses that will help them explore various majors and disciplines of interest and discover the path that will lead to their academic goals.

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First-Year Seminar

Connections and Decisions, the Freshman Seminar for Undeclared Students

FSEM 1000, Connections and Decisions, is a one-credit seminar specifically designed for first-semester freshmen in the Program for Undeclared Students.  Through this weekly course, we provide guidance to students as they explore the wide variety of opportunities and resources available on our campus.  The class is co-taught by instructors who are advisors, faculty, or graduate students, in partnership with teaching assistants, undergraduate students who enjoy introducing students to the many exciting facets of Northeastern’s campus.

Weekly discussions, in-class exercises and reflections, and homework assignments help first-year students to:

      • learn how to navigate and make the most of the resources available at the University
      • adjust to the academic and social aspects of university life
      • provide guided exploration to students as they discover the path to their academic goals
      • foster students’ independence and self-reliance as they learn to manage their academic careers

As a part of this course, students attend our Meet the Majors Fair as well as the many weekly programs offered through our What’s in a Major series where faculty and students from majors across the University speak about their classroom and co-op experiences.

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Research Seminars

Undeclared students may elect to participate in one-credit research seminars designed to introduce them to the process of conducting academic research and to explore its relevance for real-world problem solving. Students select from a broad array of research topics currently being explored by NU faculty members.  The seminars meet weekly and allow students to study important global issues in a small-group setting and, under the guidance of a faculty member, to discuss and assess the relevance and impact of these timely academic issues.

Through the research seminars, nationally-recognized Northeastern scholars help students explore:

      • what it means to be a researcher or to conduct primary research
      • why academic research should matter to people in the real-world, and
      • how research translates into individual and organizational policies and practices that can improve the world

Service-Learning

Undeclared freshmen may choose a service-learning section of FSEM1000 which will provide the opportunity for students to explore their interests, develop professional skills and prepare for their first co-op experience. The service-learning sections will serve weekly at a local organization outside of class, helping students become more familiar with the Boston community. Their service will be integrated into the FSEM1000 Connections and Decisions curriculum and allow students the unique opportunity of experiential learning in their first semester.

Here is a list of our Service-Learning Community Partners:

-Boston Rescue Mission
-Boston Scholar Athlete Program
-Ethos
-Generation Citizen
-Hostelling International, Cultural Kitchen
-Healthy Kids, Healthy Futures
-JumpStart
-LIFT-Boston
-MathPower
-Peace through Play
-Strong Women, Strong Girls
-Tobin Community Center
-United South End Settlements (USES)
-Yawkey Boys & Girls Club of Roxbury
-YMCA of Greater Boston, King K-8 School
-Youth Development Initiative Program (YDIP)

For more information on the range of service-learning opportunities offered by our Service Learning website.

If you’re interested in taking a service-learning section of your FSEM1000 seminar, please fill out the brief survey at this link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/S-L_undeclared_interest_form_Summer-Fall2012 so that we can help identify service opportunities best suited towards your academic and professional interests!

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