T+IP | Things + Intellectual Property
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The Project

 

Things + Intellectual Property (T+IP) grew from the realization that new inexpensive hand-held 3D scanners have the potential to be the most disruptive of all emerging 3D technologies. Unlike complex 3D design software, to create a 3D model from scratch, the user simply sweeps the surface of an object.

We believe that, easy-to-use 3D scanning means our culture is entering a new age of object plasticity and malleability. This is a massive paradigm shift, as for all of human experience the physical world has been governed by object permanence. With ubiquitous 3D scanning, we must now begin to reconfigure how we think about the physical world as it is captured, morphed, traded, re-contextualized and sold.

T+IP was a Fall semester 2014, semester-long directed study. We used a portable, hand-held 3D scanners in order to explore new uses for and ideas around the technology. This resulted in physical sculptures, conversations and legal thesis, that act as our response to what we believe may be the effects of 3D scanning on society.

The results of this project will be shown in a public exhibition, Winter 2015 in the 360 Gallery at Northeastern University and permanently online.

The Tech:

A 3D scanner is a device that analyses a real-world object or environment to collect data on its shape and possibly its appearance (e.g. colour). The collected data can then be used to construct digital three-dimensional models. (Wikipedia)

 

 

Intellectual Property and 3D Printing Technology:

Intellectual property law (IP) is the area of law that protects novel, creative ideas that can be reduced to practice.

The four areas of IP are:

(1) Trademark law, which protects particular aspects that can identify goods or services (i.e. words, symbols);

(2) Copyright law, which gives authors and artists the right to exclude others from to using, selling, and displaying their works without their permission (to a degree);

(3) Patent law, which give inventors the right to exclude others from making, using, selling, or otherwise infringing on their patented invention; and

(4) Trade Secret law, which protects the special formulas, practices, or methods a business may have that give it an edge over other businesses, but are known by few or hard to discover.

Since 3D scanning and 3D printing are new technology, people are as scared of its use as they are amazed. Much of the fear comes from the legal boundaries that have not yet been formed for these technologies – particularly in IP. We have seen similar legal issues in the past with new technologies (i.e. VCR’s, Game Genies, DVR’s, etc.).

A major part of T+IP was to look at 3D scanning/printing technology through the lense of IP and try to find where those legal boundaries would lie. Two of the areas of IP we looked at were Copyright law and Patent law.

Meet the Team

 
  • Janos

  • Tyler

  • Ramin

  • Simon

  • Jen

  • Jesse

Janos Stone

Janos Stone is Design Researcher in Residence in the Department of Art + Design. His interdisciplinary research combines artistic and design theory with 3D technology to explore novel, universally accessible, systems that bring creativity to everyday life. Some of Stone’s current focuses, examine the influence of 3D scanning on user generated product design, intellectual property, security risks and a digital repository of museum object collections.

Tyler Mitchell

Tyler is a Junior at Northeastern University, pursuing a dual BFA in graphic design and interactive media. He has a passion for user experience, and hopes to one day be part of a special projects team, designing and building products that redefine how we interact with each other.

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Ramin Kohanteb

Ramin is currently studying/working my way to a BFA in Graphic Design at Northeastern University where he is also providing his skills to Scout, Northeastern's student design agency as well as The Kostas Research Institute for Homeland Security. He enjoys traveling, discovering music, finding circles & whistling (often while he works).

Simon Remiszewski

Simon Remiszewski is a student and creative individual living and working in Boston, MA. He is currently finishing up his BFA at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts. Simon’s artistic practice tends to take a critical look at contemporary technologies and their communicative and sociocultural impact. His current work is engaged in the traumatic auditory effects of US drone strikes, the NSA and mythology, vape culture, and the effect of 3D scanning on artworks and art institutions.

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Jen Cipolletti

Jen Cipolletti received her Bachelor’s Degree in Art History from the University of Michigan and is currently in her second year at Northeastern University School of Law. She is interested in the intersection of art and law, and was also drawn to the project due to the potential implications of new technology on Museum policies and security. She completed her first co-op working at Northeastern for both the General Counsel’s Office and Center for Research and Innovation.

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Jesse Medina

Jesse Medina is a student at Northeastern University School of Law. He is currently finishing his final year of law school. Jesse is particularly interested in Intellectual Property Law, having completed an internship focused on Copyright and Trademark Law, and a co-op focused on Patent Law.

View Objects

Janos Stone

Janos Stone is Design Researcher in Residence in the Department of Art + Design. His interdisciplinary research combines artistic and design theory with 3D technology to explore novel, universally accessible, systems that bring creativity to everyday life. Some of Stone’s current focuses, examine the influence of 3D scanning on user generated product design, intellectual property, security risks and a digital repository of museum object collections.