Programs by Term: Summer II + Dialogue of Civilizations


Argentina: Spanish Language and Argentinian Culture

Dialogue of Civilizations | Buenos Aires, Argentina

Faculty Leader: Claudia Sokol (c.sokol@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Daisy Biddle (d.biddle@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses:

  • SPNS1302/2301/2302/3301/3302 Spanish Language Immersion
  • CLTR4944 Cultural Engagement Abroad, NU Core humanities level 1

Description:

This is a Language and Culture dialogue that goes to Buenos Aires, Argentina for 4 weeks and then to El Calafate, Provincia de Santa Cruz (Patagonia) for 5 days. The students will take language classes at a language school, Bridge Argentina in downtown Buenos Aires as well as a culture class. There will be several guest speakers that will talk about Argentina’s history as well as its complex economy, Argentinian writers such as José Hernández, Jorge Luis Borges, Ernesto Sábato, an Architecture Tour of the city of Buenos Aires, the tango and its influence in Argentina’s culture. We will take a City Tour to get to know the city and its different neighborhoods, a visit to the Teatro Colón, the second most important Opera- Concert house in the world, visit Tigre and its delta, Colonia del Sacramento in Uruguay, a World Heritage site recognized by the UNESCO, visit the El Ateneo Gran Splendid bookstore, a real gem located in the old theatre that retains all the glory of an Italian opera house, go to the Estancia Don Silvano in Capilla del Señor and experience the gaucho’s  life & folklore. In Patagonia we will visit the Parque Nacional los Glaciares & do trekking on the Glaciar Perito Moreno if the season opens when we get there! We will also volunteer at TAMA, an animal shelter & talk in two radio stations to bring awareness to the general public about the importance of helping the abandoned and abused dogs that live in the shelter under deplorable conditions, with no roof or heating enduring severe winters!


BALKANS: 20 yrs After Genocide: Conflict Resolution, National Reconstruction & European Union Politics in the Balkans

Dialogue of Civilizations | Belgrade, Serbia

Faculty co-leaders: Profs. Denis Sullivan and Will Lovely (d.sullivan@neu.edu and w.lovelyiii@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Daisy Biddle (d.biddle@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses: 

  • POLS 4938: International Politics Abroad
  • INTL 4944: Dialogue of Civilizations: Regional Engagement, NU Core arts level 1

Description:

Building off of conflict resolution & peace-building and nation-building themes, the Balkans Dialogue investigates conflict and post-conflict reconstruction in the former Yugoslavia (principally Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia, and Kosovo).  2015 is the 20th Anniversary of the end of the Bosnian War (1992-95), which included ethnic cleansing, genocide, and other war crimes - some of which are still being prosecuted 20 years later.   In this DOC,  we look especially at American efforts to end the bloody conflict in Bosnia (through the Dayton Accords) in 1995. Four years later, NATO and the US were also militarily involved in the Kosovo conflict, bombing Belgrade and other parts of Serbia.  using the case study approach, this course looks at the Balkans conflict from the break-up of Yugoslavia, the civil wars between and among a multiplicity of nationalist militias, parties and movements, and the US and NATO military strikes against Serbia during the 1990s.  We examine continuing efforts to bring war criminals to justice in The Hague as well as regional War Crimes Courts, and how this continues to impact Serbia's potential bid to join the EU and other international institutions (WTO, NATO).

SAMPLE Guest Lectures./topics include:

  • Balkans history, politics, and society
  • The fall of Yugoslavia, rise of independent "successor states"
  • Overthrowing a Dictator: the fall of Milosevic ("OTPOR!" Resistance movement)
  • War Crimes Prosecutions in Bosnia and in Serbia
  • The International Community (OHR, NATO, EU) in Bosnia, Serbia, and Kosovo
  • Islam, Christianity (Orthodox and Catholic) and Judaism in Bosnia
  • Bosnian politics post-Dayton
  • Serbian politics post-Milosevic
  • Bosnian-U.S. relations; Serbian-U.S. relations, the role of Russia, Turkey, and Arab states in Bosnia and Serbs

BRAZIL: The Brazilian Coast Dialogue – Portuguese Language And The Cultural Layers Of An Up-And- Coming Northeast State In Brazil

Dialogue of Civilizations | Maceio, Brazil

Faculty: Simone Elias (s.elias@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Daisy Biddle (d.biddle@neu.edu)

Term: Summer 2

Courses:

  • CLTR4944 Brazilian Culture Immersion, NU Core humanities level 1
  • PORT1301/1302/2301/2302/3301/3302/Directed Study Portuguese Language

Description:

Several institutions and agencies support the Maceio Brazil Dialogue, including the State Secretary of Industry and Commerce, the State House, and several environmental and educational institutions. In this Dialogue students will have the opportunity to learn about different facets of the Brazilian culture, while learning how locals and leaders preserve their environment.  In this unique dialogue, students will be immersed in the Brazilian culture in the context of environmental preservation, sustainability and economic development while learning the Portuguese language and engaging in conversations with regional leaders and locals. Environment sustainability is of global concern with the increasing awareness of global warming and preservation. This dialogue will provide a window into the best practices of organizations and locals in preserving its environmental while nurturing sustainable grown of a region. Visits include Maceio Industrial Complex, Petrobras, Brasken Villages, and Project Boi Marinho in Maragogi beach, which has been recognized worldwide for preservation of at the most endangered aquatic mammal species in Brazil to name a few visits.

Maceio 2


China: From West to East: Chinese Language and Culture

Dialogue of Civilizations | Kunming, China

Faculty Leader: Prof. Qinghong Cai (q.cai@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Information Session:

January 15th, 6-7pm, 275 Ryder Hall

Term: Summer II

Courses: 

  • CHNS 1301/1302/2301/2302/3301/3302/4301/4302 Chinese Language Immersion
  • CLTR4944 Cultural Engagement Abroad, NU Core humanities level 1

Program Description:

Description:

This Summer II China Dialogue program takes place in 4 exciting Chinese cities and offers intensive and immersive Chinese language training, including practical introduction to Chinese history, culture, ancient wisdom, and businesses.

Taipei and Hong Kong are famous international cities known as two of the four Asian little dragons in East Asia for its economic successes. Hence, students will have the opportunity to experience Chinese culture as a whole in 3 distinctively different regions with each of their own unique governmental structures and different Chinese cultural custom variations within this one program.

  • 5 week Dialogue trip:

This program will be based in the Chinese Language Center of Yunnan University, situated in Kunming, also known as “City of Eternal Spring”, famous for its perpetual spring like weather with blooms and lush vegetation all year round. It will certainly offer you a paradise-like summer.

This dialogue offers participating students 100 hours of practical Mandarin, one of the most spoken languages in the world. All classes for different levels are in small group setting which is 4 hours per weekday and is equivalent to one semester Chinese course even for the beginners. In addition, each student will have a 2-hour daily conversational practice with a language partner, one on one, whose major is teaching Mandarin as a foreign language.

Students will also attend 50 hours of cultural classes that offer interesting introduction to the only longest surviving ancient civilization in the world. This includes activities such as Meditation, Chinese Martial Arts, Birds Freeing for Good Fortune Ceremony, Chinese Tea Ceremony with live Classical instrument performance, Chinese Rap songs with Drum practice, Ancient Chinese Aromatherapy, Body/Foot Spa with Chinese herbs, Calligraphy, Chinese Paintings, Paper cutting, Chinese knotting, Chinese Folk Dance, etc.

On weekends, students get to visit world famous nature wonders as well as interesting historical and cultural sites, such as Stone Forest, Jiuxiang Karst Caves, Hong Kong night tour, etc.

You are welcome to access 2014 Summer II China Dialogue short film on YouTube

SummerIIChinaGroupChineseFolkDance-S2China


Germany: Photography and Design in a German Cultural Context – CLOSED

Dialogue of Civilizations | Berlin, Germany

*Please note this program is closed and no longer accepting applications*

Faculty Leader: Andrea Raynor (a.raynor@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses:

  • ARTE 2500: Documentary Photography OR ARTG 1250: Design Process, Context and Systems
  • ARTE 2501:German Cultural History

Description:

Spend the summer 2 term studying photography or design in Berlin, Germany. Students can choose either the Documentary Photography class or the Design Process,Context + Systems class. All students will be enrolled in the German Cultural History Class. All classes are open to the University. The Photography and Design classes can serve as electives to students outside of the Art + Design Department and fulfill major and minor requirements to students within the department. The German Cultural History credits will fulfill the university requirement of Comparative Study of Cultures.

Berlin was a nexus of 20th-century European culture, for better and for worse. Through Nationalism, Fascism-Nazism, Communism, and now Internationalism (the EU)—Berlin has been a symbol and often a victim of Europe’s idea of itself. In the 21st century, Berlin has become both the hope and the testing ground of what Europe will be in the next fifty years. We intend for this dialogue to expose our students—through the practice of photography and design—to the follies of the past and the promise of the future, while we train them in the discipline of developing a considered visual response to direct observation.


Germany: Rhetoric and Justice in Europe: How Human Rights Transformed a Continent (Honors) – CLOSED

Dialogue of Civilizations | , Germany

Faculty Leader: Michael Hoppmann (m.hoppmann@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses: 

  • HONR 3309 Honors Seminar Abroad: From Fascist Propaganda to Human Rights
  • HONR 3309 Honors Seminar Abroad: Human Rights Communication

Description: 20th century central Europe has been a laboratory of what happens when dark rhetoric and progressive reasoning struggle for dominance. In our Dialogue, we will – metaphorically and literally – follow the journey from Nazi propaganda and rhetoric (Munich) and their tragic results (Dachau concentration camp) to modern reasoning (Brussels and Amsterdam) and Human Rights (The Hague). We will stop over in Nuremberg (the site of Leni Riefenstahl’s greatest work and the Nuremberg trials that inspired the Human Rights Declaration), Heidelberg (the national center of Sinti and Roma), and Strasbourg (home of the European Court of Human Rights), with brief excursions to Tubingen, Hambach castle and Bruges.

During the dialogue we will go into close interaction with local experts and scholars on Human Rights, Argumentation, and Rhetoric. We will visit many of the key sites of Human Rights and Communication of the 20th and 21st century. Finally, we will bring some of the landmark trials and decisions of the European Court of Human Rights, the International Criminal Court and the Tribunal on Former Yugoslavia to life again, and critically question the reasoning they present.


GREECE: Then and Now – CLOSED

Dialogue of Civilizations | Athens, Greece

Group Leader: Prof. Richard A. Katula (r.katula@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Katherine Pruess (k.pruess@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses:

  • COMM 3306: International Communication Abroad
  • INTL 4944: Dialogue of Civilizations: Regional Engagement, NU Core arts level 1

Description:

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the people and the culture of Greece, from ancient times to the present. The special emphasis of this Dialogue is the Greek people and the economic crisis they face today. Students will attend lectures or events on the Greek economic crisis, Greek politics (present-day), culture (art, music, literature, film), and history (ancient and contemporary). In addition to the lectures and live events, students will visit historic sites and archaeological sites in the following venues: Athens, the Peloponnese, Crete, Santorini, Cephalonia, Rhodes, Delphi, and Olympia. At some of these sites, students will go on tours to antiquities such as the Parthenon, Mycenae, Epidaurus, Olympic grounds and museum, Delphi, Lindos, Knossos, Simi, Nafplion, ancient Agora, etc. At other sites, students will interact with local citizens and students from around the world, discussing issues common to them and controversies affecting the region. During the course, students will maintain a photo-journal, write three book reports, and write two reaction/research papers on topics associated with lectures or places from our travels.

We will meet three times prior to our departure, usually in the early evening at times convenient for all students (Fridays). During the first session, we will become familiar with the country of Greece through maps, power point slides, and a discussion of the syllabus. During the second session, we will discuss Greek history from Minoan times to the present, and the impact of Greek civilization on America. The first session will also review the necessities of travel such as packing, money, clothes, lotions, and working together as a team. The second session will focus on the Greek language, and on Greek culture today: art, media, economics, politics, etc. The second session will take place the day of our departure. The third session is a mandatory session offered by the Global Experience Office at a time to be announced by the GEO. Throughout these three sessions, we will discuss questions that arise about the logistics of the tour, and we will review our roles as cultural ambassadors.


Hong Kong: Society, Transition and Health in Hong Kong, China

Dialogue of Civilizations | Hong Kong, China

Faculty Leader: Katherine Schlatter (k.schlatter@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Term: Summer 2

Courses:

  • PHTH1261: Comparative Health Care Systems: Global Hong Kong
  • INTL 4944: Hong Kong's History, Culture, Society and Transformation, NU Core arts level 1

Program Description:

This intensive summer DOC to Hong Kong will immerse students in Southern Chinese Culture and introduce them to the economic, cultural, and societal transitions of this dynamic territory as it evolved from a grouping of villages into a British trading post, Crown Colony, and finally, as a Special Administrative Region of China.  Hong Kong is a thriving diverse international city and important economic and cultural hub situated on China'a Southern coast facing the South China Sea.  It remains a major regional trading hub, tourist destination, and producer of film, media, and innovation.


Iceland: Field Study of Volcanic and Glacial Processes CLOSED

Dialogue of Civilizations | , Iceland

Faculty Leader: Mal Hill (m.hill@neu.edu)
Study Abroad Coordinator: Daisy Biddle (d.biddle@neu.edu)
Term: Summer II
Courses: 
  • ENVR 5201 Geologic Field Seminar
  • ENVR 5202 Environmental Science Field Seminar Abroad

Description: 

Iceland’s location on an active plate boundary (the Mid-Atlantic Ridge) and its location near the Arctic Circle makes it a great destination for environmental field study of young lava flows and volcanoes; older, uplifted and more deeply eroded rocks to the east and west sides of the active rifts; and study of both modern and ancient glacial processes.  Volcanic landforms and eruption styles differ, depending on whether magma erupts on land, beneath the ice, or flows into water, and we study examples that formed in each environment.  Glaciers erode the landscape, transport and deposit sediments, and melt gradually to form rivers (much of Iceland’s electricity derives from hydropower).  Sometimes, when lava erupts beneath a glacier, rapid melting of the base of the glacier forms disruptive, magma-induced floods (known as jökulhlaup).  In addition to focusing separately on volcanic and glacial processes, we will consider the ways that magma and groundwater interact to create geothermal energy; how magma and glaciers interact; and how Icelandic society is influenced by these and other environmental factors.  This is a field-based experience, and most days involve some or much hiking to get to and from the study area for that day.  We spend most nights in tents in campgrounds, and Iceland is known for having occasionally windy and rainy weather.  Interested students can contact Mal Hill (m.hill@neu.edu) in the Department of Marine & Environmental Sciences for additional information.


IRELAND: Art Minor in Ireland

Dialogue of Civilizations | Ballyvaughn, Ireland

Faculty Leader: Mira Cantor (m.cantor@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Katherine Pruess (k.pruess@neu.edu)

Terms:

  • Summer 1 Art Studio: Painting and Drawing in Ireland
  • Summer 2 Art Studio, Culture, and History in Ireland

*Students who participate in both summer terms will fulfill four required courses for the Art Minor!  See below for more information.

Courses:
*See below for how courses fulfill Art Minor requirements

Summer 1:

  • ARTE 2500 Art + Design Abroad: Studio - Observational Drawing
  • ARTE 2500 Art + Design Abroad: Studio - Painting Basics in Ireland

Summer 2:

  • ARTE2500 Art + Design Abroad: Studio - Art Studio in Ireland
  • ARTE2501 Art and Design Abroad: History - History and Culture in Ireland

Description:

All students have their own studios.

The Art Minor in Ireland is a new program designed to allow students to complete four courses toward the Art Minor in the months of June and July for 16 credits. It also gives other students who have an interest in art the opportunity to make work for 8 credits in Summer 1 or 2.  Summer 1 is focused on the basics of painting and drawing. Summer 2 is an intermediate program focused on individual projects and self -direction in any media. (See below for more information)

These are team taught courses that will enable art students to work on their strengths. Students will experience cultural and physical differences in landscape and people which will inspire their imaginations and help interpret their experiences in a unique way. We are located at the Burren College of Art on the western coast of Ireland in a town of 400 people. All students have their own studios that are open 24/7.  A journal is required as well as some readings.

View a video of the program!

Ireland


ISRAEL: Contemporary Israel and its Complexities

Dialogue of Civilizations | Tel Aviv, Israel

Faculty Leader: Lori Lefkovitz (l.lefkovitz@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Daisy Biddle (d.biddle@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Website: Read more about the program and past student experiences here

Courses: 

  • ENGL 2610    Contemporary Israeli Literature and Art Abroad(will also meet Jewish Studies, Mideast Studies, or English elective requirements)
  • POLS 4937 : Israel: Society, Culture, and Politics(note:  prerequisite POL 1155 has been waived for this course when taken abroad; will also meet Jewish Studies, Mideast Studies, International Affairs)

Description:

Taking an interdisciplinary approach to the modern State of Israel, this Dialogue will explore the complexities of Israeli society, politics, and culture and how they are presented in journalism, art, and literature.  What are the key narratives and characteristics of Israeli society?   How do journalists and creative artists shape our perceptions of Israel’s complex reality?  How do various Israeli authors and artists grapple with such issues as diversity within the population, the conflicts between Israel and her neighbors and between Israelis and Palestinians, and how does Israel negotiate its Jewish identity with liberal democratic values?  Students will learn about Israel’s political system and political history, and they will read memoirs and fiction, visit museums on docent-led tours, and meet with leaders, journalists, artists, and academic experts.  Special focus will be on the city of Jerusalem, our host city, a multicultural center of three religions and multiple ethnic groups, but we will also travel to and study these issues as they are reflected in the South, Tel Aviv, and the North of Israel.

 


Italy: Italy and the Scientific Revolutions

Dialogue of Civilizations | Florence, Italy

Faculty Leader: Waleed Meleis (meleis@ece.neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Katherine Pruess (k.pruess@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses:

GE 1210: Scientific Revolutions Abroad
ITLNXXX: Italian Language Immersion (level depends on placement)

Description: This Dialogue studies two revolutions in scientific thought: the Scientific Revolution of the 17th and 18th centuries and the computational revolution of the 20th century.  We begin with an exploration of the Scientific Revolution, as exemplified by the work of Copernicus and Galileo in Italy.  From our base in Florence and Rome, the heart of the Italian Renaissance, we trace the evolution of scientific thought from the 16th through 18th centuries.  We study the natural connections between the history of science taking place during the Italian Renaissance through scientific outings to local museums, observatories, universities, laboratories and archaeological sites.  We then contrast this material with key results from chaos theory, computational complexity, logic, physics, quantum mechanics, and the theory of computation, all developed in the 20th century.  Students will visit key historical, cultural and artistic sites in Florence, Rome, Pisa, Bologna, and Vinci. 

For more information, please visit the Dialogue website:

http://www.northeastern.edu/scientificrevolutions


London & Edinburgh: English Culture and Documentary Filmmaking

Dialogue of Civilizations | London, England

Dialogue Leader: Professor Michelle Carr (mi.carr@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Daisy Biddle (d.biddle@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses:

  • COMM3307 - Production Practicum Abroad
  • COMM 3306 – International Communication Abroad - Britain, Empire, and Culture 

 Description: 

The London Dialogue of Civilization – English Culture and Documentary Filmmaking has two main focuses for students. First, to familiarize students with the people and the culture of England and the British Empire, with an emphasis on the city of London and its vast history. Second, to interact with local citizens to produce and edit a 10-12 minute documentary on a subject of their choice in groups of 5-7 (which will be proposed in the Spring of 2015).   Students will attend lectures about the culture and history of England in many of the key sights in London and the country. These sites include: The Tower of London, Windsor Castle, Hampton Court Palace, Westminster Abbey, Museum of London, Churchill War Rooms, Imperial War Museum (London and Duxford), and Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre. We will also visit Edinburgh, Scotland to discover the close connection between the two cities visiting Edinburgh Castle, and the Palace of Holyroodhouse. During the dialogue, students will maintain a journal documenting their learning experience, and they will also write an extensive research paper critically examining a piece of British culture, a historical event, or person.   Students will learn all aspects of documentary production from the pre-production process of intensive research and development of story ideas, scriptwriting, and networking to the technical aspects of filming, lighting, sound recording, digital editing, and graphics. Students will be working with remote equipment that includes HD Cameras, audio and remote editing equipment. The program requires enthusiasm to explore and research another culture providing students with a deeper, more complex understanding of British culture and history while exposing students to media practices; experience in media production is not a requirement.

London Documentary Filmmaking Info Session 2015

IMG_6356


Lusaka: Driving Social Change: The Role of Nonprofits and Change Makers in Zambia

Dialogue of Civilizations | Lusaka, Zambia

Faculty Leader: Lori Gardinier (l.gardinier@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses:

  • HSUV 4945 Leadership & International Program Development
  • HSUV 4866 Intercultural Studies through Human Services

Description:

This program introduces students to social change theories and social organizations in Lusaka, Zambia.  Attention is given to the political and economic forces that influence non-government organizational development, behavior and operations.  Students will analyze and compare popular preventative and reactive interventions for change including public health approaches, the use of aid, micro-lending and other sustainable development efforts.   Particular attention will be giving to issues of addiction and recovery, HIV and inadequate employment opportunities and their impact on community development.   Using lectures, presentations, case studies and service-learning this program will expose student to the theoretical and philosophical frameworks used to understand social development.  Students will also develop and apply skills, practices and techniques for program development and implementation in the nonprofit sector.  This experiential program focuses on program evaluation techniques, ethics in international volunteerism/foreign nonprofit interventions, globalization and its influence on the nonprofit sector.  Students will also consider how culture, program maturity, and management style influence organizational behaviors.  Through service-learning, team developed capacity building projects, and structured reflections students will consider the role of the third sector and other social change models in Zambia.


Lyon – French Language and Culture

Dialogue of Civilizations | Lyon, France

Faculty-Leader: Prof. Sali Ziane (s.ziane@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Daisy Biddle (d.biddle@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses: CLTR 4944 French Culture, NU Core humanities level 1

FRNH (Multiple Levels offered) 2201, 2202, 3201, 3202

Description: 

The summer language course will include 80 hours of classes in addition to the cultural and historical immersion. Those classes will cover different levels of French in order to satisfy the students’ level. The students will be exposed to intensive oral and written skills.

The program includes:
- Language practice through various activities inside and outside the classroom.
- Introduction to life in the city Lyon.
- Visits of historical sites, museums, parks, etc…
- Cultural activities.

The cultural part will be aboutFrance through history, culture and art”.

France is one of the countries that contributed in the creation of the European Union which reached today a size of 28 member countries. France historically witnessed events in Arts, Cinema and Fashion; as well as developments in Laws and Immigration, Science and Technology.

 

This Dialogue of Civilization Program is an immersion into the “New France”, both from its heart ‘Lyon’ to the metropolis ‘Paris’, and it would mean a political, social, economic and cultural overview from which students would benefit linguistically and socially.


Multiple Locations – Japanese Language and Culture

Dialogue of Civilizations | Tokyo, Japan

Faculty leader:  Kumiko Tsuji (ku.tsuji@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses:

  • CLTR 4944 Dialogue of Civilizations: Globalization, Humanities, and Cultural Studies, NU Core humanities level 1
  • JPNS 2101, 2102, 3101, 3102, 4101, 4102 (Multiple Levels)

Description:

The Dialogue program in Japan is an immersion course in language and culture. It will be held in two key cities, Tokyo and Kyoto, including visit to Nara, Hiroshima, Miyajima, Himeji, and Hakone.

 

First, we will visit Kyoto, the old capital of Japan, where there are many historical and well preserved temples and shrines. Students can learn about development of Japanese wooden architecture and the art of Japanese gardens. Cultural seminars such as tea ceremony, flower arrangement, and calligraphy will be offered at Doshisha University. During the stay in Kyoto, we will visit Nara, another ancient capital, and Himeji, the city famous for the Himeji Castle, the UNESCO World Heritage site.

 

We will also stay in Hiroshima and visit the A-Bomb Dome and the Peace Memorial Museum.

Students will have an opportunity to think about the importance of peace in our society. We will also visit Miyajima, a small island that is famous for the beautiful shrine gate.

 

Next, we will visit Tokyo, the modern capital of Japan. Students will have a chance to see two faces of Tokyo: traditional and contemporary.    In Tokyo students will take an intensive language course at Seijo University. Also, they will attend the lectures on the related subjects. Students will also have an opportunity to live with Japanese host family for a few days. It will be a wonderful experience, as they can learn the custom and culture through homestay.

 

We will also visit Hakone, part of the Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park and relax in hot springs.

 

Both in Tokyo and Kyoto, students will have an opportunity to interact and practice Japanese

with local college students on daily basis. It will give students a chance to practice Japanese and

learn the life, ideas, and interests of Japanese college students.


NETHERLANDS: Sustainable Urban Transportation

Dialogue of Civilizations | Delft, Netherlands

Faculty Leader: Prof. Peter Furth (p.furth@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

NOTE: The courses for this program are still pending approval.

Courses (Pending Approval): 

  • CIVE 4566 Design for Sustainable Urban Transportation: European Perspectives (4 credits)
  • CIVE 4567 Planning and Policy for Sustainable Urban Transportation (4 credits)

Descriptions:

While the Netherlands is as affluent a country as the US, the Dutch drive cars half as much as Americans, ride trains 10 times as much, and ride bikes 40 times as much. They also have the world’s best traffic safety record, with a traffic fatality rate 67% lower than ours. Dutch bicycling infrastructure makes it safe for everyone – children and elderly as well – to ride bikes anywhere, and is a major reason that more than 25% of trip nationwide, and more than 40% in cities like Delft and Amsterdam, are made by bike. The goal of this program is learn Dutch principles for planning cities and for designing bikeways, roads, and transit networks that make ABC (all-but-car) transportation so attractive, and that make cities livable and safe.

The dialogue takes place in historic Delft, with classes held at Delft University. Students will ride bicycles daily for commuting and for field trips. About 1/3 of the time will be spent in classrooms, 1/3 on field trips, and 1/3 working on projects. Lecture speakers include experts and local officials responsible for urban planning, bikeway design, and transit planning. Field trips, made using bicycles and trams, enable students to see good examples of urban planning, bicycling infrastructure, and high quality transit, and often involve meetings with city officials. Field trips to more distant cities (e.g., Amsterdam)  involve train travel as well. Students will write blogs and papers documenting Dutch practices and examples, and will also do design projects, applying Dutch principles and practices to redesigning a Boston-area street or area. To see projects completed in 2011 and 2012, see http://wiki.coe.neu.edu/groups/nl2011transpo/

Students must be able to ride a bike, and be fit enough to ride for several hours at a relaxed pace. Students of all majors are welcome. Civil Engineering students will get credit for one Technical Elective.


Poland: From Occupation to Resistance

Dialogue of Civilizations | Warsaw, Poland

Faculty Leader: Prof. Jeffrey Burds (j.burds@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses: 

  • HIST4946 Central Europe Abroad (Field Research)
  • INTL4944 Dialogues of Civilization/Regional,  NU Core arts level 1

Description: 

Warsaw has rapidly become a second Prague in Europe—safe, negotiable in English, a beautiful and haunting 1200-year old city that represents the very best of several European cultures.

This Summer II Dialogue will examine the history of the Second World War in Poland--from the German invasion in September 1939, the Polish national resistance, the Holocaust,  the Warsaw Uprising, the Soviet occupation of Poland from autumn 1944, and the Solidarity Movement that brought Polish independence in the 1980s.  Based at Warsaw University, the program includes regularly scheduled classes with lectures by the Dialogue leaders and local scholars, plus visits to relevant historical and cultural sites around Poland.  Excursions are planned to the concentration camps at Auschwitz; Krakow (the site of the main school for training Nazi collaborationist police and prison guards); Zakopane—a mountain resort town where the Nazis had schools for SS and Abwher (military intelligence) assets; and Gdansk, the site of the Solidarity Movement that brought liberation of Poland from Soviet power in the 1980s.  The program will include a visit to Zelazowa Wola, the birth place and museum of Chopin, and attendance of a performance of his music. More than any other, Chopin is the Polish composer who created the soundtrack of the Polish national resistance struggle.

The Program leader is Professor Jeffrey Burds, an award-winning teacher and scholar whose work on the history of the Soviet secret police throughout Eastern Europe has earned him an international reputation. Program co-leader is Izabella Burds, a native of Warsaw, with an advanced business degree and more than 20 years of experience in Polish corporate life during the transition from Soviet satellite to one of the most successful of all post-Soviet economies. The program Resident Assistant is a member of the cultural section in the U.S. embassy in Warsaw, Miss Paulina Sieradzan.

 


Russia: Russian Language and Culture – A Tale of Three Cities

Dialogue of Civilizations | Moscow, Russia

Faculty Leader: Ekaterina (Katya) Burvikova (e.burvikova@neu.edu) and Kimberly Jones (k.jones@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Katherine Pruess (k.pruess@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses: 

  • RSNN 1301/1302/2301/2302/3301/3302 Russian Language Immersion (multiple levels)
  • CLTR4944 Cultural Engagement Abroad, NU Core humanities level 1

Description:

This is a Dialogue that invites students to examine Russia beyond the headlines. As part of the Dialogue program, we explore Russia's language, culture and history, as well as its geography and politics. Much of what is written and read in today's news, especially in the United States, offers a limited and narrow view of Russia. Too often, our understanding of this vast and vibrant country is reduced to examining the actions of its leader, President Vladimir Putin. However, understanding President Putin, and indeed understanding Russia, requires looking (and listening) beyond soundbites, and investigating the broader context of state and society.

Accordingly, students will have the opportunity to explore and deepen their knowledge of the Russian language through regular classes as well as immersion in the broader society. They will also be exposed to Russia's culture and history through visits to key historic and contemporary landmarks and related lectures and readings. Russia's geography and politics will also be examined though discussions and site visits, which will also build on readings. Students will be asked to delve deeper through reflective journal entries, essays which bring the readings to life, and have the opportunity to write a research paper.

This Dialogue will be a journey - an intellectual one, but also a geographic one as we travel through to and explore three key cities in Russia: Moscow, St. Petersburg and Kazan. In many ways, Moscow is seen as the center of Russia, and it is in terms of population, government, and politics. Next, we travel to a former capital of imperial Russia - St. Petersburg - a place of great historic and cultural importance.  It also occupies a place of geopolitical prominence along the Baltic and is quite proximate to Europe.    Lastly, we travel to Kazan, the capital of Tatarstan. Tatarstan is home to many in Russia's ethnic Tatar minority community. It is also a place where the influence of the area's Muslim population is manifest in it's many mosques, and the Kazan Kremlin, a World Heritage site, sits at the region's cultural and historic crossroads.

 


Senegal: Doing Development, Encountering African Culture and Politics

Dialogue of Civilizations | , Senegal

Faculty Leader: William Miles

Study Abroad Coordinator: Katherine Pruess (k.pruess@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses:

  • POLS 4937 Encountering African Culture and Politics
  • POLS4938 Doing Development in West Africa

Description: 

Senegal – a French-speaking, Muslim nation on the West African coast – has maintained one of the most robust democratic systems on the entire African continent. That it has managed to do so in the face of persistent poverty is little less than remarkable. This program will introduce students first-hand to one of the most intriguing (and hospitable) countries in the annals of African and Islamic politics, history, culture, and economic development. By engaging in development projects via local nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), to which they will be assigned, students will experience firsthand the challenges and rewards of “doing development.” Classes at the West African Research Center (WARC) in Dakar will be supplemented by excursions throughout the city and elsewhere in the country.


SOUTH AFRICA: Social Entrepreneurship Field Research Program – CLOSED

Dialogue of Civilizations | Cape Town, South Africa

Faculty Leader: Dennis Shaughessy (d.shaughnessy@neu.edu) and Gordon Adomdza (g.adomdza@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Daisy Biddle (d.biddle@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses:

  • ENTR3306 Global Development Entrepreneurship
  • ENTR3308 Business Economic History of Modern South Africa

Description:

The Field Research Program in South Africa is a hands-on, field based research program which is focuses on social entrepreneurship in Cape Town, South Africa. Developed in 2008 by Professor Dennis Shaughnessy, this academically rigorous program will enable students to learn more about global development and how entrepreneurship can lift families out of poverty.

In Module 1, students will work directly with urban entrepreneurs from township communities to help grow their micro-businesses through the Entrepreneurs Consultation Project. Students will work in consulting teams with local students from the Tertiary School in Business Administration (TSiBA), which is a free business degree program for low-income students from the townships. At the end of Module 1, student teams will present a deliverable on behalf of their entrepreneur; select teams are eligible to receive funding of up to $10,000 USD from the NU-TSiBA MicroVenture Fund to support their entrepreneur’s business. This portion of the program allows students to gain real life "consultation" experience and also provides students with an understanding of real life venture capital for business development, particularly in an emerging market country such as South Africa.

In Module 2, students will study with Professor Gordon Adomdza to learn about human centered design and social innovation for the base of the pyramid (BoP) market. Students will have the opportunity to conduct research and consult directly for high impact social enterprises and nonprofit organizations in the Cape Town area.

The academic portion of the program includes subject material such as social entrepreneurship, social enterprise development, micro-finance, impact investing, and small business management. Classes are supplemented with site visits to social businesses and enterprises in the surrounding Cape Town or Cape Flats area. Site visits also include guest lecturers from local social enterprises and businesses, visit(s) to Robben Island, Parliament and other historical/cultural sites. Students also attend guest lectures by South African historians, politicians, journalists, faculty, venture capitalists, doctors and researchers to engage students in discussion of topics relevant to South African history post-apartheid, and how the country’s controversial history has led to its modern day business climate.

Weekends include student led service learning projects and thoughtful community service. In this service learning exercise, students are encouraged to research which organizations they wish to support, and fundraise towards their project goal; this component of the program enables students to see impact of their own strategic social investing.

Weekends also include excursions, hiking trips, and an overnight safari.

Informational video about the South Africa Social Entrepreneurship Field Research Program


Spain: Process Safety and Chemical Engineering Abroad

Dialogue of Civilizations | Tarragona, Spain

Faculty Leader: Ron Willey (r.willey@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses: 

  • CHME 2322 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 1 Abroad
  • CHME 4625 Chemical Engineering Process Safety Abroad

Description:

This program will be based in Tarragona, Spain.  Two courses will be offered, Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 1 Abroad and Process Safety Abroad.  Both are from the chemical engineering curriculum.  The first one is a required course in the curriculum.  The second one will serve as a chemical engineering elective.  The Dialogue is targeted to 2nd Semester Sophomores in the Chemical Engineering program who normally take 2 classes in Summer 2 including Thermodynamics 1.  In addition, to the courses, the program will include trips to local chemical industry in Tarragona, Spain region.  Each weekend, one day will be dedicated to cultural visits to historical sites in the Northeastern Spain (Tarragona and Barcelona).


Turkey and Germany: Politics of Space: Islam, Gender, Sexuality in Istanbul and Berlin

Dialogue of Civilizations | Istanbul, Turkey

Faculty leader: Prof. Berna Turam (b.turam@neu.edu) and Prof. Kathrin Zippel (k.zippel@neu.edu)

Teaching Assistant: Behice Pehlivan (pehlivan.b@husky.neu.edu

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Term: Summer: II

Courses: SOCL3471 Social Conflict & Community Services Abroad:  Politics of Gender and Immigration: Homeland and Host land

INTL4944 Dialogue of Civilizations: Regional Engagement: Diaspora and Urban Studies in Europe and the Middle East, NU Core arts level 1

Description:

This dialogue will provide students with an interdisciplinary understanding of urban politics in Istanbul and Berlin. We will contrast issues facing the Turkish migrant population in Berlin, Germany, with the accommodation of religion in secular neighborhoods of  Istanbul.  After three successive victories of the pro-Islamic party in secular Turkey, we witness tension and power struggles between the long time secular and new pious residents of Istanbul. These deep fault lines between urbanites with different lifestyle will be the focus of our dialogue from Istanbul to Berlin. Throughout the dialogue and in interdisciplinary student’s research projects we will explore controversial issues of politics of the city, religion, gender, sexualities and immigration.

Shortly after the end of World War II, Turkish migrant workers were brought to Berlin to assist in the postwar reconstruction efforts.  These “Gastarbeiter” (guest workers) were settled in tenement-style buildings in what was intended to be temporary accommodations until they returned to their home country.  Over time it became apparent that these workers were not returning to their homeland and Turkish “ghettos” developed into the full-blown neighborhoods of Kreuzberg and Neukoelln.  These two neighborhoods will be the loci of our urban exposure and critical analysis. The former is a highly gentrified neighborhood of Berlin, which is known as the Turkish neighborhood, but in fact appeals to a large body of residents and visitors, who appreciate mixed multi-ethnic urban space. NeuKoelln is often associated largely with lower socio-economic migrant residents, who are mostly Arabs, Middle Easterners and Turks.

Through participant observation, informal conversations and /or group discussions with the faculty leaders and guest speakers including those from the Turkish-German, gender, LGBTQ and migration community organizations, we will explore the ways in which urban, religious, gender and migration politics are played out in Germany and Turkey as they accommodate Muslim politics with a stable secular democracy.

The courses are intended for students in the University Scholars program and other exceptionally motivated and qualified students, particularly in upper classes. We encourage students from all majors who are interested to bring a unique perspective to the politics of space, religion, gender and sexuality.