FRANCE and MOROCCO: Colonial Past, Cultural Change, and Economic Development “CLOSED”

marrakesh, Morocco

Program website not available Type:   |  Minimum GPA:
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Dates

  • Summer 1 Semester - May 11- June 11, 2014 (dates subject to change)

Application Deadline

  • Summer 1 Semester - Priority Deadline: November 15, 2013

Priority deadline is November 15th with a final deadline of January 26th. Program accepting applications until filled and is subject to close at any time.

Description

Faculty Leader: Prof. Peter Fraunholtz (p.fraunholtz@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Daisy Biddle (d.biddle@neu.edu)

Information Sessions:

  • 11/5, 6-7:15 PM in 267 Ryder
  • 11/6, 1:35 - 3:00 PM in 296 Ryder Hall

Term: Summer I

Courses: 

  • INTL 3565: Morocco: History, Culture, and Economic Development
  • INTL 4944: Ethnicity, Religious Diversity, and Gender in Morocco (Regional Middle East)

Description:

As part of Africa and the Arab Middle East, with ties to an ancient and adaptive Amazigh culture, firmly integrated into the Islamic world, and linked to the French colonial past as well as the EU, Morocco offers a unique set of opportunities and experiences for history and international affairs students in general, and those interested in Islam, Multicultural Societies, Imperialism, and Post-Colonial Development in Africa and the Middle East in particular. The Morocco Dialogue Program engages students with the culture, civilization, and people of Morocco, and Moroccan immigrants living and working in France. The main themes of this year's program will focus on issues of economic development as shaped by the colonial past as well as post-colonial/Cold War and post-Cold War (globalization) dynamics.

Morocco was under French rule from 1912 to 1956, but French economic and cultural influence in the region goes well back to the mid-19<sup>th</sup> century and is still very much a factor today.  We will begin in Paris where we will examine issue of North African/Moroccan immigration as well as the challenges facing the French Republic concerning the prospects for and limits on integration of the growing Muslim population.  Site visits include the Grand Mosque of Paris, the Institute du Monde Arab, and the National Museum of the History of Immigration as well as various immigrant/North African neighborhoods.

We will spend most of our time in Marrakesh, the “Red City.”  The old Southern capital of Morocco, Marrakesh was and still is the cross roads for Arab, Berber, and Sub-Saharan African, and Jewish peoples and cultures that continue to shape Moroccan society today.  It was a key outpost in the French effort to rule the southern regions and that influence is still seen and felt in Marrakesh today.

The Marrakshi are a warm and very hospitable people and our students will get to see this first hand by living (in pairs) with Moroccan families during our stay in the city.   Among other things, our host institution, The Center for Language and Culture, teaches English to Moroccans and our homestay families are from among those in the CLC community who want to open their homes to native English-speakers.   Marrakshi families are known for their warmth and their amazing home cooking.

While in Marrakesh, students will become well acquainted through site visits and tours with the New (French) city and as well as the ancient medina and famous main square, Jma al-Fnaa.  They will participate in 8 hours of survival Arabic, lectures by the Faculty leader as well as guest lectures on Moroccan economic development in the context of French imperialism, post-colonial challenges in the shadow of the EU, and in the struggles to manage the pressures of globalization.  Lectures and others activities also focus intently on issues of gender and women’s evolving roles in Moroccan society.

While in Morocco we will also engage in a two day Intercultural Dialogue with a group of English-speaking Moroccan students, a four day visit to a Berber (Amazigh) village in the High Atlas Mountains, and a four day stay in Fez, the religious and cultural capital of Morocco and itself shaped markedly by waves of immigration from Spain from the 12<sup>th</sup> to 16<sup>th</sup> centuries.

Courses

  • INTL 3565: Morocco: History, Culture, and Economic Development
  • INTL4944: Ethnicity, Religious Diversity, and Gender in Morocco (Regional Middle East)

Host University

Les Generiques (Paris)
Center for Language and Culture (Marrakech)
Center for Arabic &Islamic Studies (Fez)

Eligibility Requirements

  • Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA
  • Students must have completed two academic semesters at NU

Application Procedure

    • Online Dialogue of Civilizations application (available on OISP website and myNEU)
    • $500 non-refundable program deposit paid through NUPay.* Be sure to select the appropriate summer term.**
    • One copy of passport ID page – to be given directly to your faculty leader after acceptance.
    • 2-3 page essay answering the following questions (copy and pasted into online application):
    1. What are your personal and academic reasons for wishing to participate in this Dialogue of Civilizations program?
    2. How will the program further your academic and career goals?
    3. What is your previous travel and language experience, if any?
    4. What courses have you taken which are directly relevant to the program?

    *If you are not accepted into your Dialogue program, the $500 deposit will be credited to your student account.

    **Applications are not considered complete until deposit is received. This deposit will be applied to the full cost of the program.

    **Faculty may require additional information and/or interview (after application deadline)

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Cost

Tuition: $10,195

DOC Fee:$2,500

Tuition and DOC Fee cover 8 Northeastern credits, round-trip airfare from Boston, housing for program duration, International SOS assistance, as well as some local transport, excursions and group meals.

Accommodations

While in Paris, students will stay in a modest hotel or hostel.  For the majority of the time in Morocco students will be staying with Moroccan families in a homestay set-up arranged by our host institutions: the Center for Language and Culture in Marrakech and the Center for Arabic &Islamic Studies in Fez.  Homestays will include breakfast and dinner and the possibility of doing one’s own laundry.  WiFi is not guaranteed in the home but internet is available there and at our host institutions as well as many local cafes. In Marrakesh some students might commute by taxi to class, but in Fez classes will be within walking distance for all.

Destination

Paris, Marrakech, High Atlas Mountains (Tidli), Fez, and Casablanca