BEIJING: IES

Beijing, China

Program Website Type:   |  Minimum GPA:
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Dates

  • Fall Semester - Late August - Mid December
  • Spring Semester - Mid January - Early May

Application Deadline

  • Fall Semester - March 1
  • Spring Semester - October 1

Description

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

As the political, intellectual, and cultural capital of China, Beijing is a dynamic city reinventing itself for the 21st century.  Beijingers remain proud of their traditions, their language, and a rich heritage that dates back centuries, making it the perfect place to study Chinese while learning about China's past, present, and future.  Spend as much time as you can indulging in this city's rich culture: explore the maze of hutong, shop the glitzy areas of Chaoyang, and wander through the majestic Forbidden City and the Temple of Heaven.

Students have the option to study for a semester abroad in Beijing by participating in one of the following IES Programs:

Language Intensive Program
With small classes, a high-quality language curriculum, and daily tutorials, this program option offers students who have already begun Chinese language studies the opportunity to rapidly expand their knowledge of spoken and written Mandarin Chinese. Students round out their schedule with a selection of area studies courses taught in English, in addition to travel to remote locations in China and the option of a for-credit internship.

Contemporary Issues in China Program
For students who wish to explore China in-depth, but do not have previous Chinese language experience, the Contemporary Issues in China Program features a series of advanced-level courses on the history, economics, and culture of China. Each course incorporates extensive field trips and travel directly into the curriculum. This new program is an ideal choice for students with little previous exposure to China.

Courses

Language Intensive Course Information

IES offers courses that explore Chinese Language and area studies through an in-depth and hands-on approach. This is an intensive program designed to maximize your time studying in Beijing.  It is for students serious about improving their Chinese and learning more about China.

Fall and spring students must enroll in a minimum of 16 semester credit hours. Because of the heavy demand of Chinese language study, we encourage you not to overload. In order to meet the 16 credits hour requirement, you take a required 10-credit Chinese language course offered at varying levels, and select one of the following options:

  • 2 English-taught area studies courses (4 credits each) OR
  • 1 English-taught area studies course (4 credits) and an internship with accompanying tutorial (4 credits)

*Students at the 300-level or above in Chinese language proficiency can enroll in Chinese-taught area studies courses.

Heritage Students
If you are a heritage speaker (you have a background of informal familial learning), you can take advantage of custom-designed programming that focuses on your individual language needs. IES Abroad Beijing reviews the level of each heritage student on a case-by-case basis and creates a program that allows you to progress further in small classes.

Center-Wide Language Pledge
The IES Center faculty take great pride in the quality of its language training. In order to create a Chinese language environment and maximize individual proficiency, you are required to observe a strict language pledge at the IES Abroad Beijing Center and on the Beijing Foreign Studies University campus. “English-friendly weekends” are interspersed throughout the semester to give you a break from the rigors of the language pledge.

Contemporary Issues in China Course Information

Students participating in this program are required to take five courses. Students will be charged Northeastern undergraduate tuition for 16 credits.  Should a student decide to transfer back a fifth course, he or she will then be charged an overload fee as defined on the Northeastern University Registrar’s website.  Please note: See Cost section for additional Study Abroad fees.

The three sequential blocks each feature two 4-credit, 300-level courses on China, as well as Chinese language classes. You select one area studies course in each block. Each block lasts four and a half weeks.

Required for all students:

  • 1 Chinese language course (4 credits) offered at beginning, intermediate, advanced intermediate, and advanced levels throughout the semester.
  • Understanding China semester (2 credits)
  • 3 English-taught area studies courses (12 credits)

The Contemporary Issues in China Program is structured around distinctive “blocks”, which all students must take. The three blocks of the semester each feature a 4-credit, 300-level course on China as well as a continuation of the Chinese language classes that began during orientation. Each block lasts 4.5 weeks.

  • Week 1 – Orientation and Chinese Language Courses.
  • Week 1-3 – Understanding China seminar.
  • Block 1 (weeks 4-8) – 4-credit area studies class and 2-hour Chinese class four days a week. Fall term Academic Field Study block.
  • Block 2 (weeks 9-12) – 4-credit area studies class and 2-hour Chinese class four days a week.
  • Block 3 (weeks 13-16) – 4-credit area studies class and 2-hour Chinese class four days a week. Spring term Academic Field Study block.

View Evaluated Courses

If you are interested in enrolling in a course not in our database, please send this course for evaluation.

Policies and Process for Evaluations

Host University

The IES Beijing program offers students a choice - a strong Chinese language program or the Contemporary Issues in China Program. Both IES Beijing programs are located on the campus of the Beijing Foreign Studies University (Beijing Waiguoyu Daxue). Popularly known as Bei Wai or BFSU, Beijing Foreign Studies University is one of Beijing’s most prestigious academic institutions. A teaching and research university, BFSU has a student body of 4,000 and is one of the 100 universities nationwide selected for priority development into the 21st century. IES Abroad is currently the only resident U.S. program at Bei Wai, giving you a better opportunity to integrate with Chinese students. Some students join the university student union and intramural sports activities, such as ping-pong and basketball.

Eligibility Requirements

Language Intensive Program Requirements

  • 3.0 GPA
  • Full-time Northeastern student
  • Sophomore, Junior or Senior standing when program begins
  • One year of previous Chinese language study

Contemporary Issues in China Program Requirements

  • 3.0 GPA
  • Full-time Northeastern student
  • Sophomore, Junior or Senior standing when program begins
  • No previous Chinese language study required

Application Procedure

    • Completed online OISP application
    • Completed online IES application

      IES will require you upload your official transcript and passport photocopy directly to the online application.

       

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    Cost

    Fall 2014 or Spring 2015: $21,367

    Includes: Northeastern University (NU) tuition for 16 NU credits ($21,267) , and 24/7 worldwide emergency assistance ($100). Please note that this program requires students to take five courses. Should students choose to transfer back the fifth course, the student will be liable for an additional 4 credit overload fee ($5,317). Students are responsible for all other expenses, including housing and other non-academic costs for which they will be billed directly by the program provider or host institution. Students are also responsible for arranging and purchasing their own flights.

    China, Beijing: IES Language Intensive Study Abroad Program Budget (Semester)

    China, Beijing: IES Contemporary Issues in China Study Abroad Program Budget (Semester)

    Accommodations

    Language Intensive Program Housing Options

    You live in a language-immersion environment to support rapid language advancement. Housing options will require a commitment to speaking Chinese as much as possible, and adhering to household and residence hall etiquette that is in harmony with Chinese cultural norms and university regulations. The final decision and allocation of housing will be made once you arrive in China

    • Homestays

    Homestays provide the ideal environment for learning about China and improving your Chinese language skills. Our homestays are located within a short walk or bus ride to the Center. All homestays feature a private bedroom. While living in a home may involve making some sacrifices of privacy and personal freedom, our Chinese homestay families are universally eager to get to know you and share their ideas, language, and culture with you. You are provided breakfast and dinner by your host family, seven days a week, while the program is in session.

    As living in homestay requires a unique commitment on the part of students, we will interview all arriving students to determine if a homestay is right for you.  Homestay opportunities are limited, and we ask that only students seriously committed to being part of family apply.

    • Residence Halls with Chinese Roommates

    You have the extraordinary opportunity to live with a Chinese student in the IES Abroad student residence hall. Although sharing a room with a Chinese roommate may require you to make cultural adjustments and compromises, the rewards are significant.

    Students often develop strong friendships with the Chinese students in the hall, and enjoy impromptu gatherings both on and off the BFSU campus. Chinese roommates are selected from BFSU’s prestigious Chinese language department and the School of International Business. The rooms are located in the IES Center and are wired for high-speed Internet access and the facility includes student lounges, shared bathrooms, washing machines, and kitchen facilities.

    Meals are not included, but you can eat at one of several university cafeterias, prepare your own meals in shared kitchens, or Take advantage of the many small, inexpensive restaurants near the campus and throughout Beijing.

    Contemporary Issues in China Program Housing Options

    You live in a language-immersion environment to support rapid language advancement. Housing options will require a commitment to speaking Chinese as much as possible, and adhering to household and residence hall etiquette that is in harmony with Chinese cultural norms and university regulations. The final decision and location of housing is made once you arrive in China.

    • Homestays

    Homestays provide the ideal environment for learning about China and improving your Chinese language skills. Most of our homestays are located within a short walk or bus ride to the Center. All homestays feature a private bedroom. While living in a home may involve making some sacrifices of privacy and personal freedom, our Chinese homestay families are universally eager to get to know you and share their ideas, language, and culture with you. We will find you a suitable “English-friendly” homestay if you don’t have Chinese language experience. As living in a homestay requires a unique commitment on the part of students, we will interview all arriving students to determine if a homestay is right for you.  Homestay opportunities are limited, and we ask that only students seriously committed to being part of a family apply.

    You are provided breakfast and dinner by your host family, seven days a week, while the program is in session.

    • Residence Halls with Chinese Roommates

    You have the extraordinary opportunity to lie with a Chinese student in a student residence hall. Although sharing a room with a Chinese roommate may require you to make cultural adjustments and compromises, the rewards are significant.

    Students often develop strong friendships with the Chinese students in the hall, and enjoy impromptu gatherings both on and off the BFSU campus. Chinese roommates are selected from BFSU’s prestigious Chinese language department and the School of International Business. The rooms are located in the IES Center and are wired for high-speed Internet access.  Dormitory floors include student lounges with WiFi, shared bathrooms, washing machines, and kitchen facilities.

    Meals are not included, but you can eat at one of several university cafeterias or prepare your own meals in shared kitchens. Take advantage of the many small, inexpensive, privately-operated restaurants near the campus and throughout Beijing.

    Destination

    What better place to study contemporary issues in China than in Beijing, a city where the future is inextricably linked to the past? From the majestic Summer Palace to the bold designs of the 2008 Olympic Village, the sights and sounds of Beijing will enchant you as you study Chinese history, economics, and culture.

    Beijing is considered the place to study Chinese in China—it sets the standard pronunciation for the rest of the country. The people of Beijing are friendly and proud to be from this fascinating city—what a perfect environment to study abroad and practice your Chinese.

    Beijing will be your classroom.  Visit Beijing's most significant palace, the Forbidden City, and learn about the Ming and Qing Dynasties. Enjoy local customs, tea tastings, and regional cuisine--like noodles and dumplings. You can also practice your language skills by going to local markets and bargaining with vendors for the best local deals. Everything you do will be part of your learning experience.