Programs by Major: International Affairs + Dialogue of Civilizations


BALKANS: 20 yrs After Genocide: Conflict Resolution, National Reconstruction & European Union Politics in the Balkans

Dialogue of Civilizations | Belgrade, Serbia

Faculty co-leaders: Profs. Denis Sullivan and Will Lovely (d.sullivan@neu.edu and w.lovelyiii@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Daisy Biddle (d.biddle@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses: 

  • POLS 4938: International Politics Abroad
  • INTL 4944: Dialogue of Civilizations: Regional Engagement, NU Core arts level 1

Description:

Building off of conflict resolution & peace-building and nation-building themes, the Balkans Dialogue investigates conflict and post-conflict reconstruction in the former Yugoslavia (principally Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia, and Kosovo).  2015 is the 20th Anniversary of the end of the Bosnian War (1992-95), which included ethnic cleansing, genocide, and other war crimes - some of which are still being prosecuted 20 years later.   In this DOC,  we look especially at American efforts to end the bloody conflict in Bosnia (through the Dayton Accords) in 1995. Four years later, NATO and the US were also militarily involved in the Kosovo conflict, bombing Belgrade and other parts of Serbia.  using the case study approach, this course looks at the Balkans conflict from the break-up of Yugoslavia, the civil wars between and among a multiplicity of nationalist militias, parties and movements, and the US and NATO military strikes against Serbia during the 1990s.  We examine continuing efforts to bring war criminals to justice in The Hague as well as regional War Crimes Courts, and how this continues to impact Serbia's potential bid to join the EU and other international institutions (WTO, NATO).

SAMPLE Guest Lectures./topics include:

  • Balkans history, politics, and society
  • The fall of Yugoslavia, rise of independent "successor states"
  • Overthrowing a Dictator: the fall of Milosevic ("OTPOR!" Resistance movement)
  • War Crimes Prosecutions in Bosnia and in Serbia
  • The International Community (OHR, NATO, EU) in Bosnia, Serbia, and Kosovo
  • Islam, Christianity (Orthodox and Catholic) and Judaism in Bosnia
  • Bosnian politics post-Dayton
  • Serbian politics post-Milosevic
  • Bosnian-U.S. relations; Serbian-U.S. relations, the role of Russia, Turkey, and Arab states in Bosnia and Serbs

FRANCE and MOROCCO: Colonial Past, Cultural Change, and Economic Development

Dialogue of Civilizations | marrakesh, Morocco

Faculty Leader: Prof. Peter Fraunholtz (p.fraunholtz@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Daisy Biddle (d.biddle@neu.edu)

Term: Summer I

Courses: 

  • INTL 3565: Morocco: History, Culture, and Economic Development
  • INTL 4944: Ethnicity, Religious Diversity, and Gender in Morocco (Regional Middle East), NU Core arts level 1

Description:

As part of Africa and the Arab Middle East, with ties to an ancient and adaptive Amazigh culture, firmly integrated into the Islamic world, and linked to the French colonial past as well as the EU, Morocco offers a unique set of opportunities and experiences for history and international affairs students in general, and those interested in Islam, Multicultural Societies, Imperialism, and Post-Colonial Development in Africa and the Middle East in particular. The Morocco Dialogue Program engages students with the culture, civilization, and people of Morocco, and Moroccan immigrants living and working in France. The main themes of this year's program will focus on issues of economic development as shaped by the colonial past as well as post-colonial/Cold War and post-Cold War (globalization) dynamics.

Morocco was under French rule from 1912 to 1956, but French economic and cultural influence in the region goes well back to the mid-19<sup>th</sup> century and is still very much a factor today.  We will begin in Paris where we will examine issue of North African/Moroccan immigration as well as the challenges facing the French Republic concerning the prospects for and limits on integration of the growing Muslim population.  Site visits include the Grand Mosque of Paris, the Institute du Monde Arab, and the National Museum of the History of Immigration as well as various immigrant/North African neighborhoods.

We will spend most of our time in Marrakesh, the “Red City.”  The old Southern capital of Morocco, Marrakesh was and still is the cross roads for Arab, Berber, and Sub-Saharan African, and Jewish peoples and cultures that continue to shape Moroccan society today.  It was a key outpost in the French effort to rule the southern regions and that influence is still seen and felt in Marrakesh today.

The Marrakshi are a warm and very hospitable people and our students will get to see this first hand by living (in pairs) with Moroccan families during our stay in the city.   Among other things, our host institution, The Center for Language and Culture, teaches English to Moroccans and our homestay families are from among those in the CLC community who want to open their homes to native English-speakers.   Marrakshi families are known for their warmth and their amazing home cooking.

While in Marrakesh, students will become well acquainted through site visits and tours with the New (French) city and as well as the ancient medina and famous main square, Jma al-Fnaa.  They will participate in 8 hours of survival Arabic, lectures by the Faculty leader as well as guest lectures on Moroccan economic development in the context of French imperialism, post-colonial challenges in the shadow of the EU, and in the struggles to manage the pressures of globalization.  Lectures and others activities also focus intently on issues of gender and women’s evolving roles in Moroccan society.

While in Morocco we will also engage in a two day Intercultural Dialogue with a group of English-speaking Moroccan students, a four day visit to a Berber (Amazigh) village in the High Atlas Mountains, and a four day stay in Fez, the religious and cultural capital of Morocco and itself shaped markedly by waves of immigration from Spain from the 12<sup>th</sup> to 16<sup>th</sup> centuries.


Germany and Poland: Holocaust and Genocide Studies

Dialogue of Civilizations | , Germany

Faculty Leaders: Professor Natalie Bormann (n.bormann@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Term: Summer I

Courses:

  • POLS4937: Government and Politics Learning Abroad in Germany and Poland
  • INTL4944: Dialogue of Civilizations: The role of Trauma and Collective Memory in Europe today, NU Core arts level 1

Description:

http://nuweb9.neu.edu/germanypolanddialogue/

https://www.facebook.com/GermanyPolandDialogue2013

This program offers students immersion into the role and legacy of the Holocaust in Germany and Poland – as one of the most significant and traumatic topics of Europe’s shared history and politics.  Students will travel to Munich, Nuremberg, Berlin, Warsaw and Krakow – cities that played central roles during the Holocaust and that continue to be central as sites of remembrance, memory and trauma.

The program consists of visits to key sites of trauma and memory, including the concentration camps of Auschwitz and Dachau, the Nuremberg trial courtroom, Schindler’s factory, the former Jewish Ghettos in Warsaw and Krakow, Villa Wannsee, and many more sites.  These visits are complemented by lectures, seminars, guided tours – given by faculty of the University of Munich, the Free University Berlin and the Jagiellonian University Krakow - interviews with Holocaust survivors, and by archival research.


Lithuania: The Baltic States Before and After Communism

Dialogue of Civilizations | Klaipeda, Lithuania

Faculty Leader: Harlow Robinson (h.robinson@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Katherine Pruess (k.pruess@neu.edu)

Term: Summer I

Courses: 

  • HIST 3304:  Topics in History: The Baltic States Before and After Communism
  • INTL 4944: The Baltic States in Transition, NU Core arts level 1

BalticStatesDialogue_v3

(click to enlarge flyer)

Description:To understand the human dimensions of the dramatic political changes that have taken place in Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia since signing of the Molotov Ribbentrop pact in 1939. What has it been like to live through the rise and fall of Communism, and into the brave—and often frightening--new world of capitalism? By using historical writings, memoirs, novels and films, we will examine the transformation of the societies in this volatile region in pre- and post-Soviet period. How did the USSR attempt to control the local populations? How have these various countries and societies dealt with the difficult transition from Communism to capitalism and joining the European Union? In light of recent events in Ukraine, we will also look at the future of the former Soviet Republics. The goal of the course is to understand better what people gained—and what they lost—when the fences and walls came tumbling down from Berlin to Riga, Vilnius and Tallinn.


Poland: From Occupation to Resistance

Dialogue of Civilizations | Warsaw, Poland

Faculty Leader: Prof. Jeffrey Burds (j.burds@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Term: Summer II

Courses: 

  • HIST4946 Central Europe Abroad (Field Research)
  • INTL4944 Dialogues of Civilization/Regional,  NU Core arts level 1

Description: 

Warsaw has rapidly become a second Prague in Europe—safe, negotiable in English, a beautiful and haunting 1200-year old city that represents the very best of several European cultures.

This Summer II Dialogue will examine the history of the Second World War in Poland--from the German invasion in September 1939, the Polish national resistance, the Holocaust,  the Warsaw Uprising, the Soviet occupation of Poland from autumn 1944, and the Solidarity Movement that brought Polish independence in the 1980s.  Based at Warsaw University, the program includes regularly scheduled classes with lectures by the Dialogue leaders and local scholars, plus visits to relevant historical and cultural sites around Poland.  Excursions are planned to the concentration camps at Auschwitz; Krakow (the site of the main school for training Nazi collaborationist police and prison guards); Zakopane—a mountain resort town where the Nazis had schools for SS and Abwher (military intelligence) assets; and Gdansk, the site of the Solidarity Movement that brought liberation of Poland from Soviet power in the 1980s.  The program will include a visit to Zelazowa Wola, the birth place and museum of Chopin, and attendance of a performance of his music. More than any other, Chopin is the Polish composer who created the soundtrack of the Polish national resistance struggle.

The Program leader is Professor Jeffrey Burds, an award-winning teacher and scholar whose work on the history of the Soviet secret police throughout Eastern Europe has earned him an international reputation. Program co-leader is Izabella Burds, a native of Warsaw, with an advanced business degree and more than 20 years of experience in Polish corporate life during the transition from Soviet satellite to one of the most successful of all post-Soviet economies. The program Resident Assistant is a member of the cultural section in the U.S. embassy in Warsaw, Miss Paulina Sieradzan.