Programs by Country: Iceland + Dialogue of Civilizations


Iceland: Field Study of Volcanic and Glacial Processes

Dialogue of Civilizations | , Iceland

Faculty Leader: Mal Hill (m.hill@neu.edu)
Study Abroad Coordinator: Daisy Biddle (d.biddle@neu.edu)
Information Session: October 29th 6-7PM 231 Forsyth Building AND November 5th 6-7PM 231 Forsyth Building
Term: Summer II
Courses: 
  • ENVR 5201 Geologic Field Seminar
  • ENVR 5202 Environmental Science Field Seminar Abroad

Description: 

Iceland’s location on an active plate boundary (the Mid-Atlantic Ridge) and its location near the Arctic Circle makes it a great destination for environmental field study of young lava flows and volcanoes; older, uplifted and more deeply eroded rocks to the east and west sides of the active rifts; and study of both modern and ancient glacial processes.  Volcanic landforms and eruption styles differ, depending on whether magma erupts on land, beneath the ice, or flows into water, and we study examples that formed in each environment.  Glaciers erode the landscape, transport and deposit sediments, and melt gradually to form rivers (much of Iceland’s electricity derives from hydropower).  Sometimes, when lava erupts beneath a glacier, rapid melting of the base of the glacier forms disruptive, magma-induced floods (known as jökulhlaup).  In addition to focusing separately on volcanic and glacial processes, we will consider the ways that magma and groundwater interact to create geothermal energy; how magma and glaciers interact; and how Icelandic society is influenced by these and other environmental factors.  This is a field-based experience, and most days involve some or much hiking to get to and from the study area for that day.  We spend most nights in tents in campgrounds, and Iceland is known for having occasionally windy and rainy weather.  Interested students can contact Mal Hill (m.hill@neu.edu) in the Department of Marine & Environmental Sciences for additional information.


Iceland: Time Machine

Dialogue of Civilizations | , Iceland

Faculty Leader: Julia Hechtman (j.hechtman@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Daisy Biddle  (d.biddle@neu.edu)

Information Session: October 15, 2014, 5:15PM, 305 Ryder and Tuesday, November 4th 5:15PM Ryder Hall

Term: Summer I

Courses: 

  • ARTE2500 Time Machine: Site Sensitivity and Iceland
  • ARTE 2501 Cultural and Art History: Iceland

Description:

This is a 5 week studio experience where students begin by collecting footage and images from a week-long road trip around 3/4th of Iceland. After that we will settle in the northwest, in a town called Skagastrond. We will spend three weeks there and then hit the road again, looking at large-scale artworks and ending up in Reykjavik.

The projects are structured and focused on landscape and it's influence on time and experience.  Students will participate in a series of exercises, hike on a glacier, go whale watching, visit a geothermically heated nature bath, watch the sun barely dip in the sky at midnight on the summer solstice, watch films, listen to lectures, and discuss readings. There are intense critiques and conversations every day except weekends.