Programs by Country: Germany


BERLIN: Architecture Program

Traditional | Berlin, Germany

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Inspired by Berlin's fascinating architectural transformation and the prolific "often controversial" construction after the fall of the Wall, this program was created for the Architecture students. Berlin is a laboratory for design experimentation. This program acquaints students with the process of rebuilding in one of Europe's key cities and instills a critical attitude towards the physical and cultural context of architecture. Students contrast the recent ultra modern commercial and bureaucratic architecture with the corroded walls and incomplete spaces that still characterize much of the urban landscape.

Today's technologies allow architects to design for building sites they may never visit. What does it mean for an architect to propose a building or to rethink an urban situation in a foreign culture? How do architects develop an appropriate understanding of a place, its history and architecture, in the design process? In Berlin's turbulent context, students combine site analysis with their talent and intuition to design locally relevant solutions.


BERLIN: Freie Universität Berlin

Traditional | Berlin, Germany

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

The FU-BEST (Berlin European Studies) Program seeks to educate responsible, global citizens by promoting intercultural sensitivity in a multi-faceted environment. The program aims to provide an intensive and diverse study abroad experience to its participants. Combining mandatory German language instruction and a varied menu of content courses taught in English and German, FU-BEST is intended to be an accessible opportunity to a wide range of potential participants. Using its concept of the “extended classroom”,  the program’s goal is to link high-quality academic instruction with a broader international experience, encompassing elements of culture, society, history, and politics, in Berlin, in Germany, and in (Central) Europe generally. Small classes and the availability of day-to-day guidance and support are designed to enable students to make the most of a unique educational opportunity.

This program offers an academic calendar consisting of two regular American-style Fall (September-December) and Spring (January-April) semesters, followed by the possibility of enrollment in the FU's Sommersemester (April-July) for students with German language skills at the upper-intermediate or advanced level.


BERLIN: Humboldt University

Traditional | Berlin, Germany

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Two hundred years ago, in 1810, Wilhelm von Humboldt's vision of a new type of university became reality. The newly founded Prussian alma mater was the first to introduce the unity of research and teaching, to uphold the ideal of research without restrictions and to provide a comprehensive education for its students. These principles of Wilhelm von Humboldt and a select group of contemporaries soon became general practice throughout the world.

As one of eleven German universities, the Humboldt-Universität was chosen “University of Excellence” in June 2012. It was successful in all three funding lines in the third round of the Excellence Initiative of the German federal and state governments and awarded for its future concept “Educating Enquiring Minds: Individuality – Openness – Guidance”. In an international comparison, Humboldt- Universität ranks among the top ten of German universities. Scientists here research socially relevant topics and challenges of the future and communicate these with the public. Humboldt-Universität invests all its energy in being a place of excellent research and teaching.


Germany and Poland: Holocaust and Genocide Studies

Dialogue of Civilizations | , Germany

Faculty Leaders: Professor Natalie Bormann (n.bormann@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Term: Summer I

Courses:

  • POLS4937: Government and Politics Learning Abroad in Germany and Poland
  • INTL4944: Dialogue of Civilizations: The role of Trauma and Collective Memory in Europe today

Description:

http://nuweb9.neu.edu/germanypolanddialogue/

https://www.facebook.com/GermanyPolandDialogue2013

This program offers students immersion into the role and legacy of the Holocaust in Germany and Poland – as one of the most significant and traumatic topics of Europe’s shared history and politics.  Students will travel to Munich, Nuremberg, Berlin, Warsaw and Krakow – cities that played central roles during the Holocaust and that continue to be central as sites of remembrance, memory and trauma.

The program consists of visits to key sites of trauma and memory, including the concentration camps of Auschwitz and Dachau, the Nuremberg trial courtroom, Schindler’s factory, the former Jewish Ghettos in Warsaw and Krakow, Villa Wannsee, and many more sites.  These visits are complemented by lectures, seminars, guided tours – given by faculty of the University of Munich, the Free University Berlin and the Jagiellonian University Krakow - interviews with Holocaust survivors, and by archival research.


Germany: Photography and Design in a German Cultural Context – CLOSED

Dialogue of Civilizations | Berlin, Germany

*Please note this program is closed and no longer accepting applications*

Faculty Leader: Andrea Raynor (a.raynor@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Information Sessions: October 28th, 5:30pm, 305 Ryder

Term: Summer II

Courses:

  • ARTE 2500: Documentary Photography OR ARTG 1250: Design Process, Context and Systems
  • ARTE 2501:German Cultural History

Term: Summer II

Description:

Spend the summer 2 term studying photography or design in Berlin, Germany. Students can choose either the Documentary Photography class or the Design Process,Context + Systems class. All students will be enrolled in the German Cultural History Class. All classes are open to the University. The Photography and Design classes can serve as electives to students outside of the Art + Design Department and fulfill major and minor requirements to students within the department. The German Cultural History credits will fulfill the university requirement of Comparative Study of Cultures.

Berlin was a nexus of 20th-century European culture, for better and for worse. Through Nationalism, Fascism-Nazism, Communism, and now Internationalism (the EU)—Berlin has been a symbol and often a victim of Europe’s idea of itself. In the 21st century, Berlin has become both the hope and the testing ground of what Europe will be in the next fifty years. We intend for this dialogue to expose our students—through the practice of photography and design—to the follies of the past and the promise of the future, while we train them in the discipline of developing a considered visual response to direct observation.


Germany: Rhetoric and Justice in Europe: How Human Rights Transformed a Continent (Honors)

Dialogue of Civilizations | , Germany

Faculty Leader: Michael Hoppmann (m.hoppmann@neu.edu)

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Information Session: October 30, 2014, 6-8 pm, 135 Shillman

Term: Summer II

Courses: 

  • HONR 3309 Honors Seminar Abroad: From Fascist Propaganda to Human Rights
  • HONR 3309 Honors Seminar Abroad: Human Rights Communication

Description: 20th century central Europe has been a laboratory of what happens when dark rhetoric and progressive reasoning struggle for dominance. In our Dialogue, we will – metaphorically and literally – follow the journey from Nazi propaganda and rhetoric (Munich) and their tragic results (Dachau concentration camp) to modern reasoning (Brussels and Amsterdam) and Human Rights (The Hague). We will stop over in Nuremberg (the site of Leni Riefenstahl’s greatest work and the Nuremberg trials that inspired the Human Rights Declaration), Heidelberg (the national center of Sinti and Roma), and Strasbourg (home of the European Court of Human Rights), with brief excursions to Tubingen, Hambach castle and Bruges.

During the dialogue we will go into close interaction with local experts and scholars on Human Rights, Argumentation, and Rhetoric. We will visit many of the key sites of Human Rights and Communication of the 20th and 21st century. Finally, we will bring some of the landmark trials and decisions of the European Court of Human Rights, the International Criminal Court and the Tribunal on Former Yugoslavia to life again, and critically question the reasoning they present.


Multi-Country Programs – CIEE

Traditional | Seville, Spain

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Built around central academic themes—art and architecture, communications and new media, tourism and business, to name a few—CIEE summer multi-country programs pair two locations in one session to create the ultimate learning experience. Take your pick from specially designed duos to pursue your academic interests in not just one, but two of the most topically relevant cities in the world!

Summer Multi-Country Programs


Turkey and Germany: Politics of Space: Islam, Gender, Sexuality in Istanbul and Berlin

Dialogue of Civilizations | Istanbul, Turkey

Faculty leader: Prof. Berna Turam (b.turam@neu.edu) and Prof. Kathrin Zippel (k.zippel@neu.edu)

Teaching Assistant: Behice Pehlivan (pehlivan.b@husky.neu.edu

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

Information Session: October 29, 2014, 11am-12pm, 210B Renaissance Park

Term: Summer: II

Courses: SOCL3471 Social Conflict & Community Services Abroad:  Politics of Gender and Immigration: Homeland and Host land

INTL4944 Dialogue of Civilizations: Regional Engagement: Diaspora and Urban Studies in Europe and the Middle East

Description:

This dialogue will provide students with an interdisciplinary understanding of urban politics in Istanbul and Berlin. We will contrast issues facing the Turkish migrant population in Berlin, Germany, with the accommodation of religion in secular neighborhoods of  Istanbul.  After three successive victories of the pro-Islamic party in secular Turkey, we witness tension and power struggles between the long time secular and new pious residents of Istanbul. These deep fault lines between urbanites with different lifestyle will be the focus of our dialogue from Istanbul to Berlin. Throughout the dialogue and in interdisciplinary student’s research projects we will explore controversial issues of politics of the city, religion, gender, sexualities and immigration.

Shortly after the end of World War II, Turkish migrant workers were brought to Berlin to assist in the postwar reconstruction efforts.  These “Gastarbeiter” (guest workers) were settled in tenement-style buildings in what was intended to be temporary accommodations until they returned to their home country.  Over time it became apparent that these workers were not returning to their homeland and Turkish “ghettos” developed into the full-blown neighborhoods of Kreuzberg and Neukoelln.  These two neighborhoods will be the loci of our urban exposure and critical analysis. The former is a highly gentrified neighborhood of Berlin, which is known as the Turkish neighborhood, but in fact appeals to a large body of residents and visitors, who appreciate mixed multi-ethnic urban space. NeuKoelln is often associated largely with lower socio-economic migrant residents, who are mostly Arabs, Middle Easterners and Turks.

Through participant observation, informal conversations and /or group discussions with the faculty leaders and guest speakers including those from the Turkish-German, gender, LGBTQ and migration community organizations, we will explore the ways in which urban, religious, gender and migration politics are played out in Germany and Turkey as they accommodate Muslim politics with a stable secular democracy.

The courses are intended for students in the University Scholars program and other exceptionally motivated and qualified students, particularly in upper classes. We encourage students from all majors who are interested to bring a unique perspective to the politics of space, religion, gender and sexuality.


VALLENDAR: WHU, Otto Beisheim School of Management

Traditional | Vallendar, Germany

Study Abroad Coordinator: Liz McClanahan (e.mcclanahan@neu.edu)

The school is AACSB, EQUIS and FIBAA-accredited. WHU's Master program was assessed to be the best in Germany in the Financial Times Master in Management Ranking 2010. All of our graduate courses as well as 80% of the undergraduate courses are taught in English. Our academic calendar complies with the American model (please see also term dates). Apart from that, our Career Service is 100% accessible for exchange students. We also offer Summer Institutes for MBA as well as for Bachelor-students.

WHU has established a unique student-exchange network with more than 170 universities around the world. No other German university-level institution comes close to enjoying so many active and high-quality partnerships.