About the Office of International Study Programs

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The Office of International Study Programs at Northeastern University is committed to providing you with high-quality study abroad opportunities that will allow you to develop the knowledge, skills and networks needed to become productive and successful participants in the global community.

Northeastern University was the recipient of the 2010 NAFSA Senator Paul Simon Award for Campus Internationalization, and the 2011 IIE Andrew Heiskell Award for Innovation in International Education: Study Abroad.

Northeastern offers two kinds of study abroad programs: Traditional, for a full fall or spring semester, or a half semester in the summer; and our own faculty-led Dialogue of Civilizations programs, in the summer. You will typically earn 16 semester hour credits in a full semester program, and 8 credits in a half-semester program. In all of our programs, you can earn Northeastern University grades and credits, and financial aid can generally be applied toward the cost.

Traditional Programs

In a traditional study abroad program, students study at one of our more than 60 Northeastern-approved institutions around the world for a full semester in fall or spring, or a half-semester in the summer. These programs are generally open to Northeastern students in any major. Students usually take courses along with the students of the host institution and in the language of the country concerned. In many cases, however, a foreign university may offer their courses in English even though that is not the primary language of the country concerned.

In addition to regular course work, some of our traditional study abroad programs, such as those in Brussels, Canberra, Dublin, and London, include opportunities for students to intern for a few hours a week with a member of parliament in the country concerned. These programs are selective and competitive.

Students may be housed in university residences on or off campus, or may opt for home-stays with local families where these options are available. Normally, our traditional programs involve a semester-long stay and will result in a student receiving 16 semester hour credits upon the successful completion of four courses. In some locations, such as Cambridge, London and Rome, it may be possible to have a half-semester stay, in which case a student will receive eight semester hour credits upon the successful completion of two courses.

Dialogue of Civilizations Programs

Open to students of any major, the Dialogue of Civilizations programs offer the opportunity for interaction between students and members of the local community around the world. The goal of each program is to connect students with their peers in different national, cultural, political and social environments, and provide them with a global experience that builds upon and enhances their academic studies and training at Northeastern.

Dialogue programs are generally offered only in Summer 1 or Summer 2. For each Dialogue program, a Northeastern faculty member leads a group of 20 or more students to one or more countries, and will teach one or both of the courses involved.

The "dialogue" in each country involves a series of meetings and discussions between students and local government and community leaders on a range of topics, including politics, popular culture, human rights and women and gender dynamics across cultures. The possible themes are virtually unlimited.

The dialogue occurs within the context of two courses (eight semester credits), which have specific themes (language immersion, politics, economics, environmental studies, conflict negotiation, globalization, communication, service learning, community activism, development studies, etc.). Dialogue programs also involve lectures, site visits and cultural events. The locations of the faculty-led programs may change from year to year, but the options are always wide-ranging.

Dialogue programs are open to eligible non-Northeastern students, but priority is given to NU students, and admission is subject to the permission of the faculty leader.