Effectiveness of a comprehensive workplace wellness and exercise program on self-reported quality of life measures and health indicators

Abstract

Objective: To examine the effectiveness of a comprehensive workplace wellness and exercise program on self-reported quality of life measures and health indicators. æMethods: A sample of 62 employees of a small business participated in a 10-week fitness program followed by a 10-week wellness program. Data were collected at baseline, after each intervention, and at 1 year, and included biometrics, fitness level, self-reported measures for stages of change, general health behaviors and perceived health. Data were analyzed using SPSS Statistical Software. æResults: Significant changes (p<.05) from baseline to 10-weeks were found for SF-36 subscales: emotional problems, energy fatigue, social functioning, and general health. Only improvements on the emotional well-being subscale were maintained at the long-term follow-up. Change from baseline to 10 weeks in social functioning was associated with change in heart rate recovery at 2 minutes (HRR2) (?=-.408, p=.048); and change in energy fatigue was associated with change in systolic blood pressure (SBP) (?=-.45, p=.018) and HRR2 (?=-.67, p=.001). Change from baseline to 20 week in general health was associated with change in energy fatigue (?=.414, p=.018). Trends were found between change in general health and change in weight (?=-.366, p=.079) and number of workouts (?=.377, p=.058); and between æchange in energy fatigue and both change in weight (?=-.376, p=.070) and cardiovascular risk factors (CVR) (?=.381, p=.066). æConclusions: Small businesses implementing a comprehensive workplace wellness program have the potential to influence employeesÍ self-perceived quality of life, in addition to weight and cardiovascular health. The present findings will inform future interventions.