Sponsor:  National Institutes of Health

Sponsor Program Solicitation: NIH PAR-15-178
Funding Amount: None Specified
Duration: 1 to 2 years


Status of this Limited Submission Opportunity

Closed


Deadlines

NU Pre-Proposal Deadline: 04/24/2015
Sponsor Deadline: 06/10/2015


Eligibility and Nomination Requirements

Only one application per institution is allowed.  This opportunity is still open.  If you are interested in applying, please contact Karen Drew (-4824) as soon as possible.

 

The applicant institution must have strong, high-quality research ongoing in the area(s) proposed under this FOA and must have the requisite faculty, staff, students and postdoctorates (as applicable), and facilities on site to conduct the proposed institutional program. It is anticipated that program faculty will have active, funded research projects in which participating trainees may gain relevant experiences consistent with their research interests and goals. In many cases, it is anticipated that the proposed program will complement other ongoing research training programs occurring at the applicant institution and that a substantial number of program faculty will have active research projects in which participating trainees may gain relevant experiences consistent with their research interests and goals.

Participating ICs

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)


Funding Areas

The Jointly Sponsored NIH Predoctoral Training Program in the Neurosciences (JSPTPN) supports broad and fundamental research training in the neurosciences via institutional NRSA research training grants (T32) at domestic institutions of higher education. Trainees appointed to this training grant are financially supported for either one or two years, during the first 2 years of their graduate research training. The primary objective is to prepare individuals for careers in neuroscience that have a significant impact on the health-related research needs of the Nation.

Broad-based research training. In keeping with the goals of the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research (http://neuroscienceblueprint.nih.gov/), the National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) are continuing this Jointly Sponsored Predoctoral Training Program in the Neurosciences (JSPTPN). The aim of this program is to encourage and support broad training in the neurosciences that will prepare students for research in the mission of any of the participating institutes.

Trainees are expected to participate in a predoctoral curriculum that provides broad and fundamental training in the neurosciences. This curriculum should include education in multiple levels of analysis (which may include, for example, genetic, molecular, cellular, systems, behavior and/or computational; note that not all programs will necessarily cover all levels of analysis, but there must be enough coverage to be considered adequate for an broad understanding of neurobiological function and the technologies used for neuroscience research ). In addition, programs are encouraged to expose students to basic, clinical and translational research approaches, and should provide significant exposure to the neuroscience of disease and disorders. It is critical that students obtain a thorough understanding of experimental design, including the principles of experimental rigor, through formal training activities (note that, although some of these examples focus on preclinical and clinical research, the principles are important, and applicable training is necessary, for all research). Programs should ensure that students have a solid understanding of statistics appropriate for neuroscience research, and should provide students with broad exposure to experimental methodologies, as success in future neuroscience research is likely to depend upon a working knowledge of multiple methodological approaches to answering scientific questions. Programs are strongly encouraged to engage students in quantitative approaches to research, which may include quantitative problem-solving, an introduction to programming, exercises in quantitative analysis of experimental research, and/or other didactic or hands-on activities that will enhance student understanding of the value of quantitative approaches to answering scientific questions.