Publications

PUBLISHED BOOKS AND MONOGRAPHS

Holli Levitsky and Phil Brown (eds.), Summer Haven: The Catskills, the Holocaust, and the Literary Imagination. Forthcoming 2015, Academic Studies Press.

Phil Brown, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Stephen Zavestoski, and the Contested Illnesses Research Group, Contested Illnesses: Citizens, Science and Health Social Movements (2012, University of California Press).

Phil Brown, Toxic Exposures: Contested Illnesses and the Environmental Health Movement (2007, Columbia University Press).

Phil Brown and Stephen Zavestoski (eds.), Social Movements in Health (2005, Blackwell Publishers).

Phil Brown (ed.), In the Catskills: A Century Of The Jewish Experience In “The Mountains” (2002, Columbia University Press).

J. Stephen Kroll-Smith, Phil Brown, and Valerie Gunter (eds.), Illness and the Environment:  A Reader in Contested Medicine (2000, New York University Press).

Phil Brown, Catskill Culture: A Mountain Rat’s Memories of the Great Jewish Resort Area(1998, Temple University Press).

Phil Brown and Edwin J. Mikkelsen, No Safe Place:  Toxic Waste, Leukemia, and Community Action, (1990, revised edition 1997, University of California Press).

Phil Brown (ed.), Perspectives In Medical Sociology (1989, fourth edition 2007, Waveland Press).

Phil Brown (ed.), Mental Health Care and Social Policy (1985, Routledge & Kegan Paul).

Phil Brown, The Transfer of Care:  Psychiatric Deinstitutionalization and Its Aftermath (1985, Routledge & Kegan Paul).

 

PUBLISHED ARTICLES

  1. Oscar Zarate, Julia Green Brody, Phil Brown, Monica Ramirez-Andreotta, Laura Perovich, and Jacob Matz, “Balancing Benefits and Risks of Immortal Data:  Participants’ Views of Open Consent in the Personal Genome Project, Hastings Center Report. In press.
  2. Elizabeth Hoover, Mia Renauld, Michael Edelstein, and Phil Brown, “Social Science Contributions to Transdisciplinary Environmental Health,” Environmental Health Perspectives. In press.
  3. Alissa Cordner, Phil Brown, and Rachel Morello-Frosch, “Health” In David Pellow, Joni Adamson, and William Gleason, (eds.) Keywords in the Study of Environment and Culture. In press.
  4. Dianne Quigley, David Sonnenfield, Phil Brown, Linlang He, and Quing Tian, “Research Ethics and Cultural Competence Training for Place-based Communities and Cultural Groups:  Reflections from a Collaborative University Partnership,” Journal of Environmental Studies and Science, 2015. On-line ahead of publication. DOI: 10.1007/s13412-015-0236-x.
  5. Alissa Cordner and Phil Brown, “Flame Retardants as a Prompt to Chemical Reform in the United States: A Multi-Sector Alliance,” Environmental Sociology, 2015, 1:69-79. DOI: 10.1080/23251042.2015.1016685.
  6. Rachel Morello-Frosch, Julia Varshavsky, Max Liboiron, Phil Brown, and Julia Green Brody, “Communicating Results in Post-Belmont Era Biomonitoring Studies:  Lessons from Genetics and Neuroimaging Research,” Environmental Research, 2015, 136:363-372. DOI:10.1016/j.envres.2014.10.001.
  7. Alissa Cordner, Phil Brown, and Margaret Mulcahy “Playing with Fire: The World of Flame Retardant Activism and Policy” In Jan Willem Duyvendak and James M. Jasper (eds.) Players and Arenas: The Interactive Dynamics of Protest, Amsterdam University Press, 2015.
  8. Alissa Cordner, Kathryn Rodgers, Rachel Morello-Frosch, and Phil Brown, “Firefighters and Flame Retardant Activism,” New Solutions,2014,24:507-530. DOI: 10.2190/NS.24.4.f.
  9. Christine M. Vatovec, Mujde Z. Erten, Jane Kolodinsky, Phil Brown, Marie Wood, Ted James, and Brian L. SpragueDuctal carcinoma in situ: a brief review of treatment variation and impacts on patients and society,” Critical Reviews in Eukaryotic Gene Expression, 2014, 24: 281–286. DOI: 10.1615/CritRevEukaryotGeneExpr.2014011495. PMCID: PMC4372113.
  10. Julia G Brody, Sarah C Dunagan, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Phil Brown, Sharylle Patton and Ruthann A Rudel, “Reporting individual results for biomonitoring and environmental exposures: Lessons learned from environmental communication case studies,” Environmental Health, 2014, 13:40. DOI: 10.1186/1476-069X-13-40. PMCID: PMC4098947.
  11. Alissa Cordner, Phil Brown, and Rachel Morello-Frosch, “Health Social Movements” In William Cockerham, Robert Dingwall, and Stella Quah (eds.) Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Health, Illness, Behavior, and Society, Wiley-Blackwell, 2014.
  12. Rachel Morello-Frosch and Phil Brown, “Science, Social Justice, and Post-Belmont Research Ethics: Implications for Regulation and Environmental Health Science,” In Daniel Kleinman and Kelly Moore (eds.) Handbook of Science, Technology, and Society, Routledge, 2014.
  13. Kelly G. Pennell, Marcella Thompson, James W. Rice, Laura Senier, Phil Brown, Eric Suuberg, “Bridging Research and Environmental Regulatory Processes: The Role of Knowledge Brokers,” Environmental Science & Technology, 2013, 47(21):11985-11992. DOI: 10.1021/es4025244. PMCID: PMC3875357.
  14. Alissa Cordner, Phil Brown, and Margaret Mulcahy, “Chemical Regulation on Fire: Rapid Policy Successes on Flame Retardants,” Environmental Science & Technology,2013, 47(3): 7067–7076. DOI: 10.1021/es3036237.
  15. Phil Brown, “Integrating Medical and Environmental Sociology with Environmental Health: Crossing Boundaries and Building Connections through Advocacy,”Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 2013, 54:144-163. DOI: 10.1177/0022146513484473.
  16. Alissa Cordner and Phil Brown, “Moments of Uncertainty: Ethical Considerations and Emerging Contaminants,” Sociological Forum, 2013, 28(3):63-107. DOI: 10.1111/socf.12034. PMCID: PMC3829201.
  17. Bindu Panikkar, Natasha Smith, and Phil Brown, “Reflexive Research Ethics in Fetal Tissue Xenotransplantation Research,” Accountability in Research: Policies and Quality Assurance, 2012, 19(6):344-369. DOI: 10.1080/08989621.2012.728910. PMCID: PMC3689847.
  18. Alissa Cordner, David Ciplet, Rachel Morello-Frosch, and Phil Brown, “Research Ethics for Environmental Health and Justice: Academics and Movement-Building,” Social Movement Studies, 2012, 11:161-176. DOI: 10.1080/14742837.2012.664898. PMCID: PMC3370411.
  19. Phil Brown, Julia Green Brody, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Jessica Tovar, Ami R. Zota, and Ruthann A. Rudel, “Measuring The Success Of Community Science: The Northern California Household Exposure Study,” Environmental Health Perspectives, 2012, 120:326–331. DOI: 10.1289/ehp.1103734. PMCID: PMC3295345.
  20. Alison K. Cohen, Allison Waters, and Phil Brown, “Place-based Environmental Health Justice Education: A Community-University-Government-Middle School Partnership,” Environmental Justice, 2012, 5(4): 188-197. DOI: 10.1089/env.2010.0021.
  21. Alissa Cordner, Alison Cohen, and Phil Brown, “Public Sociology for Environmental Health and Environmental Justice,” In Philip Nyden, Leslie Hossfeld, and Gendolyn Nyden (eds.) Public Sociology; Research, Action, and Change, Los Angeles: Sage, 2011, 97-106.
  22. Phil Brown and Alissa Cordner, “Lessons Learned from Flame Retardant Use and Regulation Could Enhance Future Control of Potentially Hazardous Chemicals,” Health Affairs, 2011, 30(5):1-9. DOI: 10.1377/hlthaff.2010.1228.
  23. Phil Brown, Mercedes Lyson, and Tania Jenkins, “From Diagnosis to Social Diagnosis,” Social Science and Medicine, 2011, 73:939-943. DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.05.031.
  24. Crystal Adams, Phil Brown, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Julia Green Brody, Ruthann Rudel,  Ami Zota, Sarah Dunagan,Jessica Tovar, ­ and Sharylle Patton,“Disentangling the Exposure Experience: The Roles of Community Context and Report-back of Environmental Exposure Data,” Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 2011, 52(2):180-196. DOI: 10.1177/0022146510395593. PMCID: PMC3175404.
  25. Phil Brown, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Stephen Zavestoski, Laura Senier, Rebecca Altman, Elizabeth Hoover, Sabrina McCormick, Brian Mayer, and Crystal Adams, “Social Movements and Health,” In Bernice A. Pescosolido, Jack K. Martin, Jane McLeod, and Anne Rogers (eds.) Handbook of Health, Illness & Healing: Blueprint for the 21st Century, New York: Springer, 2011.
  26. Rachel Morello-Frosch, Phil Brown, Mercedes Lyson, Alison Cohen, and Kimberly Krupa, “Community Voice, Vision and Resilience in Post-Hurricane Katrina Recovery,” Environmental Justice, 2011, 4:71-80. DOI: 10.1089/env.2010.0029.
  27. Rachel Morello-Frosch, Phil Brown, Julia Green Brody, Rebecca Gasior Altman, Ruthann A. Rudel, Ami Zota, and Carla Perez, “Experts, Ethics, and Environmental Justice: Communicating and Contesting Results from Personal Exposure Science,” In Gwen Ottinger and Benjamin Cohen (eds.) Engineers, Scientists, and Environmental Justice, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2011.
  28. Phil Brown, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Julia Green Brody, Rebecca Gasior Altman,  Ruthann A. Rudel, Laura Senier, Carla Pérez and Ruth Simpson, “Institutional Review Board Challenges Related to Community-Based Participatory Research on Human Exposure to Environmental Toxins: A Case Study,” Environmental Health, 2010, 9:39. DOI: 10.1186/1476-069X-9-39. PMCID: PMC2914003.
  29. Brian Mayer, Phil Brown, and Rachel Morello-Frosch, “Labor-Environmental Coalition Formation: Framing and the Right-to-Know,” Sociological Forum, 2010, 25:745-768. DOI: 10.1111/j.1573-7861.2010.01210.x.
  30. Phil Brown, “Qualitative Approaches for Studying Environmental Health” In Ivy Lynn Bourgeault, Raymond DeVries, and Robert Dingwall (eds.) Handbook of Qualitative Health Research, Sage, 2010. DOI: 10.4135/9781446268247.n39.
  31. Phil Brown, Crystal Adams, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Laura Senier, and Ruth Simpson, “Health Social Movements: History, Current Work, and Future Directions,” Forthcoming in Peter Conrad, Chloe Bird, Allan Fremont, and Stefan Timmermans (eds.) Handbook of Medical Sociology, 2010.
  32. Phil Brown, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Stephen Zavestoski, Laura Senier, Rebecca Altman, Elizabeth Hoover, Sabrina McCormick, Brian Mayer, and Crystal Adams, “Field Analysis and Policy Ethnography: New Directions for Studying Health Social Movements,” In Jane Banaszak-Holl, Sandra Levitsky, and Mayer Zald (eds.) Social Movements and the Transformation of American Health Care, Oxford University Press, 2010. DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195388299.001.0001.
  33. Julia Green Brody, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Ami Zota, Phil Brown, Carla Pérez, and Ruthann A. Rudel, “Linking Exposure Assessment Science with Policy Objectives for Environmental Justice and Breast Cancer Advocacy: The Northern California Household Exposure Study,” American Journal of Public Health, 2009, 99:S600-S609. DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2008.149088. PMCID: PMC2774181.
  34. Julia Brody, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Phil Brown, and Ruthann Rudel, “Reporting Individual Results for Environmental Chemicals in Breastmilk in a Context That Supports Breastfeeding,” Breastfeeding Medicine, 2009, 4(2): 121–121. DOI: 10.1089/bfm.2009.0006. PMCID: PMC2932546.
  35. Nerissa Wu, Michael D. McClean, Phil Brown, Ann Aschengrau, and Thomas F. Webster, “Participant Experiences in a Breastmilk Biomonitoring Study,” Environmental Health, 2009, 8:4. DOI: 10.1186/1476-069X-8-4. PMCID: PMC2649062.
  36. Rachel Morello-Frosch, Julia Green Brody, Phil Brown, Rebecca Gasior Altman, Ruthann A. Rudel, Carla Pérez, “‘Toxic Ignorance’ and the Right-to-Know:  Assessing Strategies for Biomonitoring Results Communication in a Survey of Scientists and Study Participants,” Environmental Health, 2009, 8:6. DOI: 10.1186/1476-069X-8-6.
  37. Madeleine Kangsen Scammell, David Ozonoff, Laura Senier, Jennifer Darrah, Phil Brown, and Susan Santos, “Tangible Evidence and Common Sense: Finding Meaning in a Community Health Study,” Social Science and Medicine, 2009, 68:143-153. DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2008.10.002.
  38. Elizabeth Hoover, Phil Brown, Mara Averick, Agnes Kane, and Robert Hurt, “Teaching Small and Thinking Large: Effects of Including Social and Ethical Implications in an Interdisciplinary Nanotechnology Course,” Journal of Nano Education, 2008, 1:1-10. DOI: 10.1166/jne.2009.013.
  39. Rebecca Altman, Julia Brody, Ruthann Rudel, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Phil Brown, and Mara Averick, “Pollution Comes Home and Pollution Gets Personal: Women’s Experience of Household Toxic Exposure,” Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 2008, 49:417-435. DOI: 10.1177/002214650804900404. PMCID: PMC2720130.
  40. Laura Senier, Phil Brown, Benjamin Hudson, Sarah Fort, Elizabeth Hoover, and Rebecca Tillson, “The Brown Superfund Basic Research Program (SBRP): A Multistakeholder Partnership Addresses Real-World Problems in a Contaminated Community,” Environmental Science and Technology, 2008, 42(13):4655-4662. DOI: 10.1021/es7023498. PMCID: PMC2504735.
  41. Phil Brown and Laura Senier, “Environmental Sociologists Help Form Local Environmental Justice Organization” Environment and Technology Section Newsletter, American Sociological Association, 2008.
  42. Phil Brown, “Environmental Health as a Core Public Health Component” In James Colgrove, Gerald Markowitz, and David Rosner (eds.) The Contested Boundaries of American Public Health, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2008.
  43. Laura Senier, Brian Mayer, Phil Brown, and Rachel Morello-Frosch, “School Custodians and Green Cleaners: New Approaches to Labor-Environmental Coalitions,” Organization and Environment, 2007, 20:304-324. DOI: 10.1177/1086026607305740.
  44. Julia Green Brody, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Phil Brown, Ruthann A. Rudel, Rebecca Gasior Altman, Margaret Frye, Cheryl C. Osimo, Carla Perez, and Liesel M. Seryak, “Is It Safe? New Ethics for Reporting Personal Exposures to Environmental Chemicals,” American Journal of Public Health, 2007, 97: 1547-1554. DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2006.094813. PMCID: PMC1963285.
  45. Laura Senier, Rebecca Gasior Altman, Rachel Morello-Frosch, and Phil Brown, “Research and Action for Environmental Health and Environmental Justice: A Report on the Brown University Contested Illnesses Research Group,” Collective Behavior and Social Movements Newsletter, American Sociological Association, 2006.
  46. Phil Brown, “The Jewish Community in the Catskills” In Paul Buhle (ed.) Jews in American Popular Culture, NY: Praeger Publishers, 2006.
  47. Phil Brown, Sabrina McCormick, Brian Mayer, Stephen Zavestoski, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Rebecca Gasior, and Laura Senier, “‘A Lab of Our Own’:  Environmental Causation of Breast Cancer and Challenges to the Dominant Epidemiological Paradigm,” Science, Technology, and Human Values, 2006, 31:499-536. DOI: 10.1177/0162243906289610.
  48. Rachel Morello-Frosch, Steve Zavestoski, Phil Brown, Sabrina McCormick, Brian Mayer, and Rebecca Gasior, “Social Movements in Health: Responses to and Shapers of a Changed Medical World,” Kelly Moore and Scott Frickel (eds.) In The New Political Sociology of Science: Institutions, Networks, and Power, Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 2005.
  49. Benjamin Gerhardstein and Phil Brown, “The Benefits of Community Medical Monitoring at Nuclear Weapons Production Sites: Lessons from Fernald,” Environmental Law Reporter, 2005, XXXV:10530-10538.
  50. Stephen Zavestoski, Phil Brown, Sabrina McCormick, “Gender, Embodiment, and Disease: Environmental Breast Cancer Activists’ Challenges to Science, the Biomedical Model, and Policy,” Science as Culture, 2004, 13:563-586. DOI: 10.1080/0950543042000311869.
  51. Stephen Zavestoski, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Phil Brown, Brian Mayer, Sabrina McCormick, and Rebecca Gasior, “Health Social Movements and Contested Illnesses,” Research in Social Movements, Conflict and Change, 2004, 25:253-278. DOI: 10.1016/S0163-786X(04)25010-8.
  52. Kirsten Rudestam, Phil Brown, Christine Zarcadoolas, and Catherine Mansell, “Children’s Asthma Experience and the Importance of Place,” Health, 2004, 8:423-444. DOI: 10.1177/1363459304045697.
  53. Phil Brown, Steve Zavestoski, Theo Luebke, Josh Mandlebaum, Sabrina McCormick, and Brian Mayer, “Clearing the Air and Breathing Freely: The Health Politics of Air Pollution and Asthma,” Melanie Dupuis (ed.) In Smoke and Mirrors: Air Pollution as a Social and Political Artifact, New York: New York University Press, 2004. DOI: 10.2190/d7qx-q3fq-bjug-evhl.
  54. Phil Brown, Brian Mayer, Stephen Zavestoski, Theo Luebke, Josh Mandlebaum, and Sabrina McCormick, “The Politics of Asthma Suffering: Environmental Justice and the Social Movement Transformation of Illness Experience,” David Pellow and Robert Brulle (eds.) In Where We Live, Work, and Play: A Critical Appraisal of the Environmental Justice Movement, Cambridge: MIT Press, 2005.
  55. Phil Brown and Stephan Zavestoski, “Social Movements in Health: An Introduction,” Sociology of Health and Illness, 2004, 26:679-694. DOI: 10.1111/j.0141-9889.2004.00413.x.
  56. Phil Brown, Steve Zavestoski, Theo Luebke, Joshua Mandelbaum, Sabrina McCormick, and Brian Mayer, “Clearing the Air and Breathing Freely:  Disputes Over Air Pollution and Asthma,” International Journal of Health Services, 2004, 34:39-63. DOI: 10.2190/D7QX-Q3FQ-BJUG-EVHL.
  57. Sabrina McCormick, Julia Brody, and Phil Brown, “Lay Involvement in Breast Cancer Research,” International Journal of Health Services, 2004, 34:625-646. DOI: 10.2190/HPXB-9RK8-ETVM-RVEA.
  58. Stephen Zavestoski, Phil Brown, Sabrina McCormick, Brian Mayer, Maryhelen D’Ottavi, and Jaime Lucove, “Patient Activism and the Struggle for Diagnosis: Gulf War Illnesses and Other Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms in the US,” Social Science and Medicine, 2004, 58:161-175. DOI: 10.1016/S0277-9536(03)00157-6.
  59. Phil Brown, Steve Zavestoski, Sabrina McCormick, Brian Mayer, Rachel Morello-Frosch, and Rebecca Gasior, “Embodied Health Movements: Uncharted Territory in Social Movement Research,” Sociology of Health and Illness, 2004, 26:1-31. DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9566.2004.00378.x.
  60. Phil Brown, “Qualitative Methods in Environmental Health Research,” Environmental Health Perspectives, 2003, 111:1789-1798. DOI: 10.1289/ehp.6196.
  61. Sabrina McCormick, Phil Brown, and Stephen Zavestoski, “The Personal Is Scientific, the Scientific is Political: The Environmental Breast Cancer Movement,” Sociological Forum, 2003, 18:545-576. DOI: 10.1023/B:SOFO.0000003003.00251.2f.
  62. Phil Brown, Steve Zavestoski, Theo Luebke, Joshua Mandelbaum, Sabrina McCormick, and Brian Mayer, “The Politics of Asthma Suffering: Environmental Justice and the Social Movement Transformation of Illness Experience,” Social Science and Medicine, 2003, 57:453-464. DOI: 10.1016/S0277-9536(02)00375-1.
  63. Phil Brown, Steve Zavestoski, Meadow Linder, Sabrina McCormick, and Brian Mayer, “Chemicals and Casualties: The Search for Causes of Gulf War Illnesses,” In Monica Casper (ed.) Synthetic Planet: Chemical Politics and the Hazards of Modern Life, 2003, Routledge.
  64. Phil Brown, Brian Mayer, and Meadow Linder, “Moving Further Upstream: From Toxics Reduction to the Precautionary Principle,” Public Health Reports, 2002, 117:574-586. DOI: 10.1016/S0033-3549(04)50202-9. PMCID: PMC1497491.
  65. Phil Brown, Brian Mayer, Stephen Zavestoski, Sabrina McCormick, and Pamela Webster, “Policy Outcomes for Contested Environmental Diseases,” Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 2002, 584:175-202. DOI: 10.1177/0002716202584001013.
  66. Phil Brown and Richard Clapp, “Looking Back on Love Canal,” Public Health Reports, 2002, 117:95-117. DOI: 10.1016/S0033-3549(04)50115-2. PMCID: PMC1497413.
  67. Phil Brown, “Environmental Health and Safety, Social Aspects,” International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences, 2002.
  68. Steve Zavestoski, Phil Brown, Meadow Linder, Brian Mayer, and Sabrina McCormick, “Science, Policy, Activism, and War: Defining the Health of Gulf War Veterans,” Science, Technology, and Human Values, 2002, 27:171-205. DOI: 10.1177/016224390202700201.
  69. Phil Brown, Steve Zavestoski, Sabrina McCormick, Joshua Mandelbaum, and Theo Luebke, “Print Media Coverage of Environmental Causation of Breast Cancer,” Sociology of Health and Illness, 2001, 23:747-775. DOI: 10.1111/1467-9566.00274.
  70. Phil Brown, Steve Zavestoski, Sabrina McCormick, Joshua Mandelbaum, Theo Luebke, Meadow Linder, “A Gulf Of Difference: Disputes Over Gulf War-Related Illnesses,” Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 2001, 42:235-257. DOI: 10.2307/3090213.
  71. Phil Brown, “Health and the Environment,” In Peter Conrad, Chloe Bird, and Alan Fremont (eds.) Handbook of Medical Sociology, Prentice-Hall, 2000.
  72. Elizabeth Cooksey and Phil Brown, “Spinning on its Axes:  DSM and the Social Construction of Psychiatric Diagnosis,” International Journal of Health Services, 1998, 28: 525-554. DOI: 10.2190/1C4D-B7XT-BLLY-WH4X.
  73. Phil Brown, “Popular Epidemiology Revisited” Current Sociology, 1997, 45:137-156. DOI: 10.1177/001139297045003008.
  74. Phil Brown, “Social Science and Environmental Activism:  A Personal Account” In Philip Nyden, Anne Figert, Mark Shibley, and Darryl Burrows (eds.) Building Community:  Social Science in Action, Pine Forge Press, 1997.
  75. Phil Brown, Desiree Ciambrone, and Lori Hunter, “Does Green Mask Gray?:  Environmental Equity Issues at the Metropolitan Level,” International Journal of Contemporary Sociology, 1997, 34:141-158.
  76. Phil Brown, Peter Conrad, Jonathan Howland, Nicole Bell, and Martha Lang, “State Level Clustering of Safety Measures and Its Relationship to Injury Mortality,” International Journal of Health Services, 1997, 27:347-357.  Reprinted in Nancy Krieger (ed.) Embodying Inequality: Epidemiologic Perspectives, Amityville, N.Y.: Baywood, 2005.
  77. Phil Brown, “Catskill Culture:  An Ethnography of Jewish-American Resort Society” Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, 1996, 25:83-119. DOI: 10.1177/089124196025001006.
  78. Phil Brown and Judith Kelley, “Physicians’ Knowledge of and Actions Concerning Environmental Health Hazards: Analysis of Survey of Massachusetts Physicians,” Industrial and Environmental Crisis Quarterly, 1996, 9:512-542.
  79. Phil Brown, “Race, Class, and Environmental Health:  A Review and Systematization of the Literature,” Environmental Research, 1995, 69:15-30. DOI: 10.1006/enrs.1995.1021.
  80. Phil Brown, “Popular Epidemiology, Toxic Wastes, and Social Movements,” In Jonathan Gabe (ed.) Medicine, Health and Risk:  Sociological Perspectives, Oxford, UK: Blackwell, 1995, 91-112.
  81. Phil Brown, “Naming and Framing: The Social Construction of Diagnosis and Treatment,” Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 1995, extra issue:34-52.
  82. Phil Brown and Margaret Drugovich, “‘Some of These Questions May Sound Silly':  Humor, Discomfort, and Evasion in the Mental Status Examination,” Research in the Sociology of Health Care, 1995, 12:159-174.
  83. Phil Brown and Faith Ferguson, “‘Making a Big Stink': Women’s Work, Women’s Relationships, and Toxic Waste Activism” Gender & Society, 1995, 9:145-172.  Reprinted in Carolyn Sachs (ed.) Women and Natural Resources, Taylor and Francis, 1997.
  84. Ann Dill, Phil Brown, Desiree Ciambrone, and William Rakowski, “The Meaning and Practice of Self Care by Older Adults,” Research on Aging, 1995, 17:8-41. DOI: 10.1177/0164027595171002.
  85. Phil Brown and Susan Masterson-Allen, “The Toxic Waste Movement: A New Kind of Activism,” Society and Natural Resources, 1994, 7:269-286. DOI: 10.1080/08941929409380864.
  86. Peter Conrad and Phil Brown, “Rationing Medical Care: A Sociological Viewpoint,” Research in the Sociology of Health Care, 1993, 10:3-22.
  87. Phil Brown, “Psychiatric Intake as a Mystery Story,” Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry, 1993, 17:255-280. DOI: 10.1007/BF01379328.
  88. Phil Brown, “Popular Epidemiology and Toxic Waste Contamination:  Lay and Professional Ways of Knowing,” Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 1992, 33:267-281. DOI: 10.2307/2137356.
  89. Phil Brown, “Themes in Medical Sociology,” Journal of Health Policy, Politics, and Law, 1991, 16:595-604. Reprinted in Howard Schwartz (ed.) Dominant Themes in Medical Sociology, McGraw-Hill. DOI: 10.1215/03616878-16-3-595.
  90. Phil Brown, “The Popular Epidemiology Approach to Toxic Waste Contamination,” In Stephen Robert Couch and J. Stephen Kroll-Smith (eds.) Communities at Risk: Collective Responses to Technological Hazards. Peter Lang Publishers, 1991.
  91. Susan Allen and Phil Brown, “Public Reaction to Toxic Waste Contamination:  Analysis of a Social Movement,” International Journal of Health Services, 1990, 20:485-499. DOI: 10.2190/ATLC-AX39-M5EX-BYHF.
  92. Phil Brown, “The Name Game: Toward a Sociology of Diagnosis,” Journal of Mind and Behavior, 1990, 11(2-3).
  93. Phil Brown “Psychiatric Dirty Work Revisited: Conflicts in Servicing Non-Psychiatric Agencies,” Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, 1989, 2:182-201. DOI: 10.1177/089124189018002005.
  94. Phil Brown and Elizabeth Cooksey, “Mental Health Monopoly: Corporate Trends in Mental Health Services,” Social Science and Medicine, 1989, 28:1129-1138. DOI: 10.1016/0277-9536(89)90005-1.
  95. Phil Brown, “Recent Trends in the Political Economy of Mental Health Care” In Christopher J. Smith and John Giggs (eds.) Location and Stigma: Emerging Themes in the Study of Mental Health and Mental Illness, London: Allen and Unwin, 1989, 58-80.
  96. Phil Brown and Christopher J. Smith, “Mental Patients’ Rights: An Empirical Study of Variation across the United States,” International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 1988, 11:157-165. DOI: 10.1016/0160-2527(88)90028-3.
  97. Phil Brown, “Popular Epidemiology: Community Response to Toxic Waste-Induced Disease in Woburn, Massachusetts and Other Sites,” Science, Technology, and Human Values, 1987, 12(3-4):76-85. Reprinted in Peter Conrad and Rochelle Kern (eds.) The Sociology of Health and Illness, St. Martin’s Press and in Howard Schwartz (ed.) Dominant Themes in Medical Sociology, McGraw-Hill.
  98. Phil Brown, “Diagnostic Conflict and Contradiction in Psychiatry,” Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 1987, 28:37-50. DOI: 10.2307/2137139.
  99. Marion Wolf and Phil Brown, “Overcoming Institutional and Community Resistance to a Tardive Dyskinesia Management Program,” Hospital and Community Psychiatry, 1987, 38:65-68. Reprinted in Marion E. Wolf and Aron Mosnaim (eds.) Tardive Dyskinesia: Biological Mechanisms and Clinical Aspects, Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press, 1988.
  100. Phil Brown and Steven C. Funk, “Tardive Dyskinesia:  Barriers to the Professional Recognition of an Iatrogenic Disease,” Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 1986, 29:116-132. DOI: 10.2307/2136311.
  101. Phil Brown, “Mental Hospital Staff Attitudes towards Mental Patients’ Rights,” International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 1986, 8:423-441. DOI: 10.1016/0160-2527(86)90054-3.
  102. Phil Brown, “Psychiatric Treatment Refusal, Patient Competence, and Informed Consent,” International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 1986, 8:83-94. DOI: 10.1016/0160-2527(86)90085-3.
  103. Phil Brown, “The Right to Refuse Treatment and the Movement for Mental Health Reform,” Journal of Health Policy, Politics, and Law, 1984, 9:291-313. DOI: 10.1215/03616878-9-2-291.
  104. Phil Brown, “Marxism, Psychology, and the Sociology of Mental Health” International Journal of Health Services, 1984, 14:237-264. DOI: 10.2190/H82D-NBGF-3EYH-3AFY.
  105. Phil Brown, “Interdisciplinary Methods of Teaching about Mental Illness,” In Paul A. Lacy (ed.) Revitalizing Teaching through Faculty Development, Jossey-Bass, 1983.
  106. Phil Brown, “Mental Patients as Victims and Victimizers,” In Andrew Karmen and Donald MacNamara (eds.) Deviance and Victimology, Sage Publications, 1983, 183-217.
  107. Phil Brown, “Attitudes toward the Rights of Mental Patients: A National Study in the United States,” Social Science & Medicine, 1982, 16:2025-2039. DOI: 10.1016/0277-9536(82)90159-9.
  108. Phil Brown, “Public Policy and the Rights of Mental Patients: A National Study in the United States,” Mental Disability Law Reporter, Vol. 6, No. 1, 1982:55-58.
  109. Phil Brown “Approaches to Evaluating the Outcome of Deinstitutionalization: A Reply to Christenfeld,” Journal of Community Psychology, 1982, 10:256-280. DOI: 10.1002/1520-6629(198207)10:3<276::AID-JCOP2290100312>3.0.CO;2-H.
  110. Phil Brown, “Public Policy Failures in Deinstitutionalization: A Response to Critics,” Journal of Community Psychology, 1982, 10:90-94. DOI: 10.1002/1520-6629(198201)10:1<90::AID-JCOP2290100117>3.0.CO;2-B.
  111. Phil Brown, “Antipsychiatry and the Left,” Psychology and Social Theory, 1982, 1(2):19-28.
  112. Phil Brown, “The Mental Patients’ Rights Movement and Mental Health Institutional Change,” International Journal of Health Services, 1981, 11:523-540. DOI: 10.2190/CU8G-D0RJ-YY54-UC3F.
  113. Phil Brown, “Social Implications of Deinstitutionalization,” Journal of Community Psychology, Vol. 8, No. 4, October 1980. DOI: 10.1002/1520-6629(198010)8:4<314::AID-JCOP2290080405>3.0.CO;2-J.
  114. Phil Brown, “Mental Health Policy Problems,” In Richard Baron, Irving Rutman and Barbara Klaczynski (eds.) The Community Imperative: Proceedings of a National Conference on Overcoming Care of the Mentally Ill, Philadelphia, Horizon House Institute for Research and Development, 1980, 415-428.
  115. Phil Brown, “The Transfer of Care: U.S. Mental Health Policy since World War II” International Journal of Health Services, Vol. 9, No. 4, November 1979. DOI: 10.2190/T9PN-63L0-Q9DW-U8FT.
  116. Phil Brown, “Political-Economic and Professionalist Barriers to Community Control of Mental Health Services,” Journal of Community Psychology, Vol. 6, No. 4, October 1978. DOI: 10.1002/1520-6629(197810)6:4<384::AID-JCOP2290060417>3.0.CO;2-V.
  117. Phil Brown, “Political Psychology,” Issues in Radical Therapy, No. 20, Fall 1977.
  118. Phil Brown, “Early Indian Trade in the Development of South Carolina: Politics, Economics, and Social Mobility in the Proprietary Period, 1670-1719,” South Carolina Historical Magazine, Vol. 76, No. 3, July 1975.
  119. Phil Brown, “Social Change at Harrowdale State Hospital,” Rough Times, Vol. 2, No. 6, April 1972. Reprinted in Radical Therapist Collective (ed.) Rough Times, Ballantine, 1973.
  120. Phil Brown, “Civilization and Its Dispossessed:  Wilhelm Reich’s Correlation of Sexual and Political Repression,” The Radical Therapist, Vol. 2, No. 4, December 1971.
  121. Phil Brown, “Male Supremacy in Freud,” The Radical Therapist, Vol. 2, No. 2, September 1971. Reprinted in Jim Smrtic (ed.) Abnormal Psychology: A Perspectives Approach, Wayne, NJ, Avery Publishing, 1979.
  122. Phil Brown, “Notes on Fanon,” The Radical Therapist, Vol. 1, No. 2, June-July 1970. Reprinted in Radical Therapist Collective (ed.) The Radical Therapist, Ballantine, 1972.