profile photo

Elizabeth Maddock Dillon

Co-Director, Professor
English, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley
@EMDillon
Fields: Early American literature, Atlantic colonialism, the early novel, feminist theory, political theory, aesthetics, transatlantic print culture, Caribbean literature, and early American drama.
Recent Publications: New World Drama: Theatre of the Atlantic, 1660-1850, forthcoming from Duke University Press
Current Projects: I study print and performance in the 18th-century Atlantic World. I’m interested in thinking about the theatre as a cultural commons; I’m also working on a project about geography, sex, race, and reproduction, especially in the early Caribbean.
profile photo

David Lazer

Co-Director
Political Science, Ph.D. University of Michigan
Website   
Fields: Computational social science
Recent Publications: A. Hannak, P. Sapiezynski, A. Kakhki, B. Krishnamurthy, D. Lazer, A. Mislove, C. Wilson, “Measuring Personalization of Web Search,” In Proceedings of the 22nd International World Wide Web Conference (WWW'13), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, May 2013. Y. Altshuler, M. Fire, E. Shmueli, Y. Elovici, A. Bruckstein, A. Pentland and D. Lazer, “The Social Amplifier – Reaction of Human Communities to Emergencies,” Journal of Statistical Physics, 2013. K. Esterling, M. Neblo, and D. Lazer, “Means, Motive, & Opportunity in Becoming Informed About Politics: A Deliberative Field Experiment with Members of Congress and Their Constituents,” Public Opinion Quarterly 75, 2012: 483-503 M. Binz-Scharf, D. Lazer, and I. Mergel, Searching for answers: Networks of Practice among Public Administrators. American Review of Public Administration, 41(2), 2012: 202-225. (Winner of best paper of the year in ARPA)
profile photo

Ryan Cordell

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor
English, Ph.D. University of Virginia
Website    @ryancordell
Fields: Digital Humanities; nineteenth-century American literature; history of the book; print culture; periodical studies; new media history; religion and literature; American religious history
Recent Publications: "'Taken Possession of’: The Reprinting and Re-authorship of Hawthorne’s ‘Celestial Railroad’ in the Antebellum Religious Press” forthcoming in Digital Humanities Quarterly, Spring 2013.
Current Projects: My work focuses on intersections between religion and fiction in nineteenth-century American mass media. I am currently developing a comparative, digital edition of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Celestial Railroad” at celestialrailroad.org. I am also collaborating with NULab faculty David Smith and Elizabeth Dillon on a second project, Uncovering Reprinting Networks in Nineteenth-Century American Periodicals, which seeks to develop theoretical models describing what qualities, both textual and thematic, helped news stories, fiction, and poetry “go viral” in nineteenth-century America. I am a founding board member of centerNet’s DHCommons Initiative, which is an online hub focused on matching digital humanities projects seeking assistance with scholars interested in project collaboration. I also contribute to the group blog ProfHacker at the Chronicle of Higher Education.
profile photo

Alan Mislove

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor
Computer Science, Ph.D. Rice University

Fields: Systems issues in online social networks; user privacy in online social networks; addressing multiple-idetity (Sybil) attacks; deriving insights from large-scale online social network data
Recent Publications: “Defending against large-scale crawls in online social networks” in Proceedings of the 8th ACM International Conference on emerging Networking EXperiments and Technologies (CoNEXT’12), Nice, France, December 2012
Current Projects: I am studying new approaches to content distribution in online social networks, and new mechanisms for building online social networks that afford users more privacy and control over their data.
profile photo

Isabel Meirelles

Core Faculty, Associate Professor
Visual Communication Design, MFA Massachusetts College of Art
Website    @IsabelMeirelles
Fields: Information design; visualization of data; interaction design; graphic design.
Recent Publications: Design for Information: An introduction to the histories, theories, and best practices behind effective information visualizations (Rockport Publishers, 2013)
Current Projects: I examine the fundamentals underlying how information is structured, represented, and communicated in different media. My design practice focuses on interdisciplinary collaborations with research groups toward structuring and visualizing information. I co-chair the Arts, Humanities, and Complex Network symposium that runs parallel to the Network Science Conference–NetSci, with recent publication of an eBook produced in partnership with Leonardo/International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology and MIT Press.
profile photo

Christo Wilson

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor
Computer Science, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara
Website    @bowlinearl
Current Projects: Professor Wilson’s research focuses on security and privacy for online social networks. His work begins with fundamental measurement and modeling of social networks and user dynamics. He then applies this knowledge to to build security and privacy-preserving systems that scale to today¹s massive social networks. As part of this work, he developed a system for China’s largest social network that has successfully detected more than 1 million fake accounts in its first year of use. His expertise extends to other aspects of the social web and to networks more broadly. He is working with Assistant Professor Alan Mislove to explore the Internet filter bubble, a term social scientists coined to describe the perils of content personalization on major websites. His interests also include examining ways to improve network protocols for data centers.
profile photo

Dietmar Offenhuber

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor
Art + Design and Public Policy, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Website   
Fields: Urban Studies, Visualization and Media Arts, Participatory Design
Recent Publications: Offenhuber, Dietmar, David Lee, Malima I. Wolf, Santi Phithakkitnukoon, Assaf Biderman, and Carlo Ratti. 2012. “Putting Matter in Place.” Journal of the American Planning Association 78 (2): 173–196. (Best Paper 2012, Journal of the American Planning Association), Offenhuber, Dietmar, and Carlo Ratti, eds. 2013. Die Stadt entschlüsseln. Basel: Bauwelt Fundamente.
Current Projects: Accountability Technologies - visual media in urban governance; Forager - technologies for participatory waste systems; Infrastructure legibility - design factors for urban services
profile photo

David Smith

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor
Computer Science, PhD, Johns Hopkins University
@dasmiq
Fields: Computational linguistics and natural language processing with applications to information retrieval, machine translation, and digital humanities
Recent Publications: Infectious texts: Modeling text reuse in nineteenth-century newspapers. In IEEE Workshop on Big Data and the Humanities, 2013; Efficient nearest-neighbor search in the probability simplex. In Proceedings of the International Conference on the Theory of Information Retrieval (ICTIR), 2013; Online polylingual topic models for fast document translation detection. In Proceedings of the Workshop on Statistical Machine Translation, 2013.
Current Projects: I study how analyzing natural language data helps us uncover underlying networks and how this relational structure helps us better analyze text. Along with Profs. Cordell and Dillon, I work on the Viral Texts project to explore the culture of reprinting the 19th century publications and its relationship to the communication, transportation, political and social networks of the time. I am looking at how the reuse of policy ideas in congressional bills illuminate the process of legislation. With researchers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, I am investigating how different subcommunities of scientists explore the research literature. I am also working on scalable information extraction and retrieval in large collections of scanned books and their use for modeling historical language change.
profile photo

Nick Beauchamp

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor
Political Science, Ph.D. New York University
Website   
Fields: Political behavior; political opinion and psychology; Congress; social media; networks; automated text analysis; machine learning.
Recent Publications: “Someone is Wrong on the Internet: Political Argument as the Exchange of Conceptually Networked Ideas” (under review); “A Bottom-up Approach to Linguistic Persuasion in Advertising” (under review).
Current Projects: My work examines how political opinions form and change as a result of discussion, deliberation, and argument. I use techniques from machine learning, automated text analysis, and social network analysis to understand how complex linguistic data affect, shape, and reveal beliefs in a variety of domains, such as legislatures, political ads, social media, and judicial decisions. I am currently studying how conceptual networks differ by ideology, and how the propagation of phrases and talking points reveal hidden social networks and political strategies.
profile photo

Christoph Riedl

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor
Information Systems, PhD, Technische Universität München, Germany; Information Systems, MSc; Computer Science, BSc
Website    @criedl
Fields: Data science and computational social science which I apply to substantive research questions on decision making by individual (peer-review), decision making by groups (collective intelligence), social media and online social networks, individual and team productivity, and the Web as a platform for service innovation.
Recent Publications: Tweeting to Feel Connected: A Model for Social Connectedness in Online Social Networks, International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction (IJHCI), 29(10), 1-18.
Current Projects: I study information diffusion and strategic behavior in multidimensional networks in crowdsourced creative collaboration. I also study team formation and creative collaboration in the context of crowdsourcing competitions.
profile photo

Julia Flanders

Core Faculty, Professor of the Practice
English, PhD, Brown University; BA, Harvard University and Cambridge University
Website    @julia_flanders
Julia Flanders is a Professor of the Practice of English and Director of the Digital Scholarship Group at Northeastern University, where she also directs the Women Writers Project. She serves as editor in chief of Digital Humanities Quarterly, and has also served as chair of the Text Encoding Initiative Consortium, as president of the Association for Computers and the Humanities, and as secretary of the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations. She received BA degrees from Harvard University and Cambridge University, and a PhD in English from Brown University. From 1993 to 2013 she worked at Brown University at the Women Writers Project and as a member of the Scholarly Technology Group. Her research interests include scholarly text encoding, textual editing, and humanities data modeling.
profile photo

Benjamin Schmidt

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor
History, Ph.D, Princeton University
Website    @benmschmidt
Benjamin Schmidt is an assistant professor of history at Northeastern University and core faculty at the NuLab for Texts, Maps, and Networks. His research interests are in the digital humanities and the intellectual and cultural history of the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries. His dissertation, “Paying Attention,” described how new ways of measuring attention in early 20th century psychology found unexpected uses in teaching, advertising, and media. His digital humanities research focuses particularly on text mining and the potential of large historical datasets for humanistic research. Recent work in topic modeling, visualization of historic data, and thematic mapping.
profile photo

Brooke Foucault Welles

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication Studies
PhD, Media, Technology & Society, School of Communication, Northwestern University
Website    @foucaultwelles
Recent Publications: Big Data, Big Problems, Big Opportunities, forthcoming in Hargittai, E. and Sandvig, C. Digital Confidential. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
Current Projects: My research focuses on how network structure shapes and constrains human behavior, with a particular emphasis on how computer-mediated communication networks influence individual and team success. I am currently collaborating with after school programs in Boston and New York to better understand how social media help young people understand and access social capital, and I am also collaborating with NULab co-director David Lazer to develop a series of online experiments that examine how distributed teams can build effective online communication networks.
profile photo

Benjamin J. Doyle

Graduate Fellow
Department of English
Benjamin Doyle is a first-year Ph.D. student in English at Northeastern University. He researches eighteenth and nineteenth-century transatlantic American, Caribbean, and British print and performance cultures. His work is informed by studies in aesthetic and poetic theory, political philosophy, postcolonial theory, visual theory, and the digital humanities. He is currently developing a project that investigates the political poetics of dissensus in the work of Phillis Wheatley and Frederick Douglass, and that argues for the site of unfreedom as necessarily the proper locus for transformational political thought and practice. He is also working as a research assistant for Professors Elizabeth Maddock Dillon and Nicole Aljoe to develop a digital archive of the Caribbean through Northeastern University’s NULab for Texts, Maps, and Networks.
profile photo

Abby Mullen

Graduate Fellow
Department of History
Website    @abbymullen
Abby Mullen is a second-year PhD student in world history. Her general fields of interest are the early American republic and Atlantic history. Her special area of focus is the early American navy, particularly in the age of sail. Her projected dissertation topic analyzes the American navy's diplomatic and military roles in the Mediterranean from 1800-1815. She is also interested in how to use the tools of digital humanities in pedagogy, both in and out of the classroom. She blogs at abbymullen.org, and is on Twitter @abbymullen. She works on the Viral Texts project at the NULab.
profile photo

Elizabeth Hopwood

Graduate Fellow
Department of English
@LizzieHopwood
Elizabeth Hopwood is a Ph.D. candidate in English at Northeastern University studying C19 transatlantic literature and the Digital Humanities. Her dissertation, "Eating the Atlantic: Race, Gender, and Gastronomic Borders in 19th Century U.S. and Caribbean Literature," examines foodways nineteenth century U.S. and Caribbean novels and slave narratives. Most recently she has worked as a research assistant on Our Marathon: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive; the Women Writer's Project; and the Early Caribbean Digital Archive.
profile photo

David DeCamp

Graduate Fellow
Department of History
@DeCampD
David DeCamp is a Ph.D. student in World History at Northeastern University. His research interests primarily concern London transportation and urbanization after the Industrial Revolution, with a particular focus perceptions and portrayals of the London Underground. He has worked on digital projects such as Around DH in 80 Days, Our Marathon, and Knowledge Organization and Data Modeling in the Digital Humanities for the Women Writer's project.
profile photo

James McGrath

Graduate Fellow
Department of English
@JimMc_Grath
Jim McGrath is a Ph.D. candidate in English at Northeastern University. His dissertation examines contemporary American poetry, new media, and archival practices. His research interests include new media, digital poetics, digital archives, and Internet culture. He is presently a project director on Our Marathon: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive, and he runs the Twitter account for The NULab. He's also the bibliographic developer for Digital Humanities Quarterly. Recreational projects include floating around Weird Twitter under various pseudonyms and very occasionally blogging here (and even less occasionally here and here).
profile photo

Alicia Peaker

Graduate Fellow
Department of English
Website    @aliciapeaker
Alicia Peaker is a PhD Candidate in English literature at Northeastern University. Her dissertation, “The Different Way We Tried to Respond”: Women, Literature, and the Environment 1900-1950 is an eco-feminist project that explores how women writing in Britain in the first half of the twentieth century contributed to ecological discourses. Her research interests include gender and sexuality studies, digital humanities, landscape studies, and 19th & 20th century British literature. She is currently a project director at Our Marathon: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive, the project coordinator for the Women Writers Project, and the development editor for GradHacker.