Elizabeth Maddock Dillon : Co-Director, Professor

Elizabeth Maddock Dillon

Co-Director, Professor

e.dillon@neu.edu
Elizabeth Maddock Dillon's Twitter

Fields: Early American literature, Atlantic colonialism, the early novel, feminist theory, political theory, aesthetics, transatlantic print culture, Caribbean literature, and early American drama.

Recent Publications: New World Drama: Theatre of the Atlantic, 1660-1850, forthcoming from Duke University Press

Current Projects: I study print and performance in the 18th-century Atlantic World. I’m interested in thinking about the theatre as a cultural commons; I’m also working on a project about geography, sex, race, and reproduction, especially in the early Caribbean.

David Lazer : Co-Director

David Lazer

Co-Director

d.lazer@neu.edu
David Lazer's Twitter

Fields: Computational Social Science

Professor Lazer is a professor of political science and computer and information science and the co-director of the NULab for Texts, Maps, and Networks. Before joining the Northeastern faculty in fall 2009, he was an associate professor of public policy at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and director of its Program on Networked Governance. He holds a PhD in political science from the University of Michigan. Professor Lazer’s research centers on social networks; governance, or how the patterns of institutional relations yield functional or dysfunctional systems; and technology and its use in communication. An authority on social networks, he has written several papers on the diffusion of information among interest groups and between these groups and the government. He is the co-editor of Governance and Information Technology: From Electronic Government to Information Government and also written extensively on the use of DNA in the criminal justice system.

Website: http://www.davidlazer.com/

Moya Bailey : Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

Moya Bailey

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

m.bailey@northeastern.edu
Moya Bailey's Twitter

Dr. Moya Bailey is an assistant professor in the Department of Cultures, Societies, and Global Studies and the program in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Northeastern University. Her work focuses on Black women’s use of digital media to promote social justice as acts of self-affirmation and health promotion. She is interested in how race, gender, and sexuality are represented in media and medicine. She currently curates the #transformDH Tumblr initiative in Digital Humanities (DH). She is a monthly sustainer of the Allied Media Conference, through which she is able to bridge her passion for social justice and her work in DH.

Nick Beauchamp : Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

Nick Beauchamp

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

n.beauchamp@neu.edu
Nick Beauchamp's Twitter

Fields: Political behavior; political opinion and psychology; Congress; social media; networks; automated text analysis; machine learning.

My work examines how political opinions form and change as a result of discussion, deliberation, and argument.  I use techniques from machine learning, automated text analysis, and social network analysis to understand how complex linguistic data affect, shape, and reveal beliefs in a variety of domains, such as legislatures, political ads, social media, and judicial decisions.  I am currently studying how conceptual networks differ by ideology, and how the propagation of phrases and talking points reveal hidden social networks and political strategies.

Website: http://nickbeauchamp.com/

Michelle Borkin : Assistant Professor, College of Computer and Information Science

Michelle Borkin

Assistant Professor, College of Computer and Information Science

m.borkin@neu.edu
Michelle Borkin's Twitter

Fields: Visualization (information and scientific), human-computer interaction (HCI), medical imaging and radiology, astrophysics, and cognition and perception

I work on the development of novel visualization techniques and tools to enable new insights and discoveries in data. I work across disciplines to bring together computer scientists, doctors, and astronomers to collaborate on new analysis and visualization techniques, and cross-fertilize techniques across disciplines. My research has resulted in the development of novel computer assisted diagnostics in cardiology, scalable visualization solutions for large network data sets, and novel astrophysical visualization tools and discoveries. My main research interests include information and scientific visualization, hierarchical and multidimensional data representations, network visualization, visualization cognition, user interface design, human computer interaction (HCI), and evaluation methodologies.

Ryan Cordell : Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

Ryan Cordell

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

r.cordell@neu.edu
Ryan Cordell's Twitter

Fields: Digital Humanities; nineteenth-century American literature; history of the book; print culture; periodical studies; new media history; religion and literature; American religious history

My work focuses on intersections between religion and fiction in nineteenth-century American mass media. I am currently developing a comparative, digital edition of Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Celestial Railroad" at celestialrailroad.org. I am also collaborating with NULab faculty David Smith and Elizabeth Dillon on a second project, Uncovering Reprinting Networks in Nineteenth-Century American Periodicals, which seeks to develop theoretical models describing what qualities, both textual and thematic, helped news stories, fiction, and poetry “go viral” in nineteenth-century America. I am a founding board member of centerNet's DHCommons Initiative, which is an online hub focused on matching digital humanities projects seeking assistance with scholars interested in project collaboration. I also contribute to the group blog ProfHacker at the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Website: http://ryancordell.org/

Cody Dunne : Assistant Professor, College of Computer and Information Science

Cody Dunne

Assistant Professor, College of Computer and Information Science

c.dunne@northeastern.edu
Cody Dunne's Twitter

Cody Dunne is an Assistant Professor at Northeastern University’s College of Computer and Information Science. He works at the intersection of information visualization, network science, human-computer interaction, and computer science. Cody focuses on techniques for making data easier to analyze and share, as well as the application of visualization techniques to real-world problems. He is currently researching ways to improve the readability of network visualizations as well as developing the next generation of tools for visually exploring, sharing and collaborating around data and analysis workflows.

Some domains Cody has worked on include visualizing concepts from medical records, the spread of infectious diseases, citations in academic literature, interactions of people and organizations, relationships in archaeological dig sites, news term co-occurrence, thesaurus category relationships, municipal energy use and computer network traffic flow. Cody’s research interests include information visualization, visual analytics, graph & network visualization, data workflows, data & analytic provenance, human-computer interaction (HCI), and personal health informatics.

Prior to joining Northeastern, Cody was a research scientist in IBM Watson Health, IBM Watson, and IBM Research. Cody received his PhD and M.S. degrees in computer science under Ben Shneiderman at the University of Maryland Human-Computer Interaction Lab in 2013 and 2009, respectively. Cody earned a B.A. degree in computer science and mathematics from Cornell College in 2007.

Website: http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/cody/

Julia Flanders : Core Faculty, Professor of the Practice; Interim Co-Director

Julia Flanders

Core Faculty, Professor of the Practice; Interim Co-Director

j.flanders@neu.edu
Julia Flanders's Twitter

Julia Flanders is a Professor of the Practice of English and Director of the Digital Scholarship Group at Northeastern University, where she also directs the Women Writers Project. She serves as editor in chief of Digital Humanities Quarterly, and has also served as chair of the Text Encoding Initiative Consortium, as president of the Association for Computers and the Humanities, and as secretary of the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations. She received BA degrees from Harvard University and Cambridge University, and a PhD in English from Brown University. From 1993 to 2013 she worked at Brown University at the Women Writers Project and as a member of the Scholarly Technology Group. Her research interests include scholarly text encoding, textual editing, and humanities data modeling.

Alan Mislove : Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

Alan Mislove

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

amislove@ccs.neu.edu
Alan Mislove's Twitter

Fields: Systems issues in online social networks; user privacy in online social networks; addressing multiple-idetity (Sybil) attacks; deriving insights from large-scale online social network data

My research interests revolve around understanding the security and privacy implications of emerging online services. We're interested in problems including algorithm auditing of large-scale systems, better understanding the (in)security of the SSL ecosystem, and how to better design cloud computing systems to meet end users' needs.

Alicia Sasser Modestino : Associate Professor, Economics & School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs

Alicia Sasser Modestino

Associate Professor, Economics & School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs

a.modestino@neu.edu
Alicia Sasser Modestino's Twitter

Fields: Labor Market Dynamics, Skills Mismatch, Youth Labor Market Attachment, Migration, Housing, Health Care Reform, Regional Economic Analysis

Dr. Alicia Sasser Modestino is an associate professor with appointments in the School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs and the Department of Economics. Previously, Modestino was a Senior Economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston where she lead numerous research projects on regional economic and policy issues for the New England Public Policy Center. In that role, she frequently advised policymakers and business leaders and testified on key pieces of legislation related to labor market policies. Her work has appeared in journals such as Regional Science and Urban Economics, Journal of Human Resources, and Health Affairs and has been presented at the annual meetings of the American Economic Association.

Website: http://www.northeastern.edu/cssh/faculty/alicia-sasser-modestino

Dietmar Offenhuber : Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

Dietmar Offenhuber

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

d.offenhuber@neu.edu
Dietmar Offenhuber's Twitter

Fields: Urban Studies, Visualization and Media Arts, Participatory Design

Dietmar Offenhuber is Assistant Professor at Northeastern University in the departments of Art + Design and Public Policy, where he heads the Information Design and Visualization graduate program. He holds a PhD in Urban Planning from MIT, a MS in Media Arts and Sciences from the MIT Media Lab, and a Dipl. Ing. in Architecture from the Technical University Vienna. Dietmar was Key Researcher at the Austrian Ludwig Boltzmann Institute and the Ars Electronica Futurelab and professor in the Interface Culture program of the Art University Linz, Austria.

His research field could be described as Accountability Design – focusing on the relationship between visual representations and urban governance. Dietmar led a number of research projects investigating formal and informal waste systems and has published books on the subjects of Urban Data, Accountability Technologies and Urban Informatics. His PhD dissertation received the Outstanding Dissertation Award 2014 from the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT, his research received the Best Paper Award 2012 from the Journal of the American Planning Association.

Website: http://www.offenhuber.net

Élika Ortega : Core Faculty, Assistant Professor, Department of Cultures, Societies and Global Studies

Élika Ortega

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor, Department of Cultures, Societies and Global Studies

e.ortegaguzman@northeastern.edu
Élika Ortega's Twitter

Élika Ortega is a literary and media scholar and a digital humanist. Her work focuses on the intersection of literature, print-digital culture, and global exchanges in the 21st Century. She writes about digital literature, media, materiality, reading practices, global networks, digital humanities, and multilingualism.

Her projects include “A Handbook of E-Lit Reading”, an archive of instructions to read electronic literature works; “No Legacy || Literatura electrónica” (2016) an exhibition of electronic and print literature in Spanish, Portuguese, and English; and Textual Environments, her monograph investigating print-digital works of literature.

Élika serves on several professional organizations. She is chair of Global Outlook::Digital Humanities, executive council officer of the Association for Computers and the Humanities, and part of the communications team of the Electronic Literature Organization.

Élika keeps close ties with scholars all over the world and often writes for Red de Humanidades Digitales and _laboratorio de literaturas extendidas y otras materialidades_.

Tina Eliassi-Rad : Associate Professor, College of Computer and Information Science

Tina Eliassi-Rad

Associate Professor, College of Computer and Information Science

eliassi@ccs.neu.edu
Tina Eliassi-Rad's Twitter

Tina Eliassi-Rad is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Northeastern University in Boston, MA. She is also on the faculty of Northeastern's Network Science Institute. Prior to joining Northeastern, Tina was an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Rutgers University; and before that she was a Member of Technical Staff and Principal Investigator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Tina earned her Ph.D. in Computer Sciences (with a minor in Mathematical Statistics) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research is rooted in data mining and machine learning; and spans theory, algorithms, and applications of massive data from networked representations of physical and social phenomena. Tina's work has been applied to personalized search on the World-Wide Web, statistical indices of large-scale scientific simulation data, fraud detection, mobile ad targeting, and cyber situational awareness. Her algorithms have been incorporated into systems used by the government and industry (e.g., IBM System G Graph Analytics) as well as open-source software (e.g., Stanford Network Analysis Project). In 2010, she received an Outstanding Mentor Award from the Office of Science at the US Department of Energy.

Website: http://eliassi.org

Christoph Riedl : Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

Christoph Riedl

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

c.riedl@neu.edu
Christoph Riedl's Twitter

Fields: Data science and computational social science which I apply to substantive research questions on decision making by individual (peer-review), decision making by groups (collective intelligence), social media and online social networks, individual and team productivity, and the Web as a platform for service innovation.

I study information diffusion and strategic behavior in multidimensional networks in crowdsourced creative collaboration. I also study team formation and creative collaboration in the context of crowdsourcing competitions.

Website: http://christophriedl.net

Benjamin Schmidt : Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

Benjamin Schmidt

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

b.schmidt@neu.edu
Benjamin Schmidt's Twitter

Benjamin Schmidt is an assistant professor of history at Northeastern University and core faculty at the NuLab for Texts, Maps, and Networks. His research interests are in the digital humanities and the intellectual and cultural history of the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries. His dissertation, “Paying Attention,” described how new ways of measuring attention in early 20th century psychology found unexpected uses in teaching, advertising, and media. His digital humanities research focuses particularly on text mining and the potential of large historical datasets for humanistic research. Recent work in topic modeling, visualization of historic data, and thematic mapping.

Website: http://benschmidt.org/

Rory Smead : Associate Professor, Philosophy

Rory Smead

Associate Professor, Philosophy

r.smead@northeastern.edu
Rory Smead's Twitter

Rory Smead is associate professor of philosophy at Northeastern University. He received his BA from the University of Minnesota Duluth, his MA from the University of California, and his PhD in logic and philosophy of science from the University of California, Irvine. Professor Smead’s research is currently focused on the evolution of social behavior, the connections between evolution and learning, applications of game theory to ethics, and philosophical issues surrounding the use of idealized mathematical models in the social and biological sciences.

Website: https://sites.google.com/site/rorysmeadhomepage/

David Smith : Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

David Smith

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

dasmith@ccs.neu.edu
David Smith's Twitter

Fields: Computational linguistics and natural language processing with applications to information retrieval, machine translation, and digital humanities

I study how analyzing natural language data helps us uncover underlying networks and how this relational structure helps us better analyze text. Along with Profs. Cordell and Dillon, I work on the Viral Texts project to explore the culture of reprinting the 19th century publications and its relationship to the communication, transportation, political and social networks of the time. I am looking at how the reuse of policy ideas in congressional bills illuminate the process of legislation. With researchers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, I am investigating how different subcommunities of scientists explore the research literature. I am also working on scalable information extraction and retrieval in large collections of scanned books and their use for modeling historical language change.

Lu Wang : Assistant Professor, College of Computer and Information Science

Lu Wang

Assistant Professor, College of Computer and Information Science

luwang@ccs.neu.edu
Lu Wang's Twitter

Fields: Natural Language Processing, Computational Social Science, Machine Learning

Lu Wang is Assistant Professor of College of Computer and Information Science at Northeastern University. She earned her Ph.D. in Computer Science from Cornell University and her B.S. in Intelligence Science and Engineering and her B.Econ. in Economics from Peking University. Lu is interested in developing Natural Language Processing and Machine Learning techniques to help people efficiently and effectively understand and absorb knowledge from large-scale text data with inherent noise. I am interested in understanding how people argue with and influence others, as well as form their own opinions on topics of interest. Especially, I study the task of discovering linguistic patterns that reflect these processes, and using them for social interaction analysis and prediction.

Website: http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/luwang/

Brooke Foucault Welles : Core Faculty, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication Studies

Brooke Foucault Welles

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication Studies

b.welles@neu.edu
Brooke Foucault Welles's Twitter

Brooke Foucault Welles is an Assistant Professor in the department of Communication Studies and a faculty affiliate of the Network Science Institute at Northeastern University. Dr. Foucault Welles studies how social networks shape and constrain human behavior, with a particular emphasis on how the recall and activation of network ties influences success in personal and team goals. In the past, Dr. Foucault Welles has examined how social networks influence friendship selection in online communities. More recently, her work focuses on how people come to recognize resources within their social networks and leverage them to achieve personal, organizational and social goals. Her work is supported by grants from the US Army Research Office (W911NF-14-1-0672) and US Army Research Lab (W911NF-09-2-0053).

Dr. Foucault Welles teaches classes in social science research methods, children and media, and social network analysis. Prior to joining the faculty at Northeastern University, Dr. Foucault Welles earned her Ph.D. from the department of Communication Studies at Northwestern University. She also holds BA and MS degrees in Communication Studies and Information Science from Cornell University.

Website: http://www.northeastern.edu/camd/commstudies/people/brooke-foucault-welles/

John Wihbey : Assistant Professor, Journalism, CAMD

John Wihbey

Assistant Professor, Journalism, CAMD

j.wihbey@neu.edu
John Wihbey's Twitter

Fields: News media and information quality/credibility issues; social networks and news dissemination/consumption; climate change communications and sustainability; societal effects of big data

John is an assistant professor in the School of Journalism, where he teaches digital storytelling, data journalism, and new media. His research interests include the dynamics of online environments for news production and engagement; government transparency and access to knowledge; and climate change communications. He was formerly Assistant Director for Journalist’s Resource at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy, and a lecturer in journalism at Boston University. He writes for outlets such as the New York Times, Boston Globe, National Geographic, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Nieman Journalism Lab, and Yale Climate Connections. He has been a producer and digital editor for the NPR show “On Point,” from WBUR-Boston, and a reporter for the Star-Ledger in New Jersey.

Website: http://www.northeastern.edu/camd/journalism/people/john-wihbey/

Christo Wilson : Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

Christo Wilson

Core Faculty, Assistant Professor

cbw@ccs.neu.edu
Christo Wilson's Twitter

Professor Wilson’s research focuses on security and privacy for online social networks. His work begins with fundamental measurement and modeling of social networks and user dynamics. He then applies this knowledge to to build security and privacy-preserving systems that scale to today's massive social networks. As part of this work, he developed a system for China’s largest social network that has successfully detected more than 1 million fake accounts in its first year of use. His expertise extends to other aspects of the social web and to networks more broadly. He is working with Assistant Professor Alan Mislove to explore the Internet filter bubble, a term social scientists coined to describe the perils of content personalization on major websites. His interests also include examining ways to improve network protocols for data centers.

Website: http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/cbw/index.html

Staff

Sarah Connell : Assistant Director

Sarah Connell

Assistant Director

sa.connell@northeastern.edu
Sarah Connell's Twitter

Fields: Early modern British and Irish literature, world medieval literature, medieval and early modern European historiography, archival studies, Irish studies, early women’s literature

Recent Publications: My recent publications include two chapters on text encoding and transformation, co-authored with Julia Flanders and Syd Bauman for Doing Digital Humanities: Practice, Training, Research; a presentation and accompanying article, “Meta(data)morphosis,” co-authored with Ashley Clark and published in Proceedings of XML In, Web Out: International Symposium on sub rosa XML by the Balisage Series on Markup Technologies; and the article “The Poetics and Politics of Legend: Geoffrey Keating’s Foras Feasa ar Éirinn and the Invention of Irish History,” published in The Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies.

Current Projects: My current current research activities include a text encoding project, Making Room in History, in which I am using markup to analyze the ways that medieval and early modern writers invoked historical and legendary materials to construct arguments about sovereignty. In addition to my work at the NULab, I am also the assistant director of the Women Writers Project, where we have just begun an NEH-funded initiative to research intertextual networks in early women's writing.