3Qs: SCOTUS rejects affirmative action challenge

In a win for affir­ma­tive action advo­cates, the Supreme Court on Thursday rejected a chal­lenge to a pro­gram at the Uni­ver­sity of Texas that con­siders race as a lim­ited factor in admis­sions deci­sions. Dan Urman, assis­tant teaching pro­fessor and director of the Doc­torate in Law and Policy pro­gram, exam­ines the court’s deci­sion and what it means for affir­ma­tive action.

3Qs: Justice Scalia’s legacy, and what his death means for politics and the law

Supreme Court Jus­tice Antonin Scalia’s death touched off a polit­ical debate that could define Pres­i­dent Obama’s final year in office and bring drama to an already con­tentious pres­i­den­tial pri­mary. Pro­fessor Michael Melt­sner, a con­sti­tu­tional law expert, called Scalia’s death “a great blow to Repub­li­cans” and “a gift to Hillary Clinton.”

Law school alumna to argue landmark Supreme Court same-​​sex marriage case

Mary Bonauto, L’87, has been selected by the attor­neys for gay and les­bian plain­tiffs to argue for over­turning same-​​sex mar­riage bans, based on the rights afforded by the 14th amendment.

Looking ahead: US politics in 2015

The Obama administration’s agenda, the next pres­i­den­tial cam­paign, and polit­ical behavior on social media are among the topics that assis­tant pro­fessor of polit­ical sci­ence Nick Beauchamp will be closely fol­lowing this year.

3Qs: Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision

Law pro­fessor Wendy Parmet ana­lyzes the U.S. Supreme Court ruling Monday that some for-​​profit com­pa­nies with reli­gious objec­tions can avoid paying for employees’ con­tra­cep­tive care, a require­ment of the Afford­able Care Act.