Good things come in small packages

Pic­ture this: A sensor the size of two match­sticks side-​​by-​​side that can detect a bac­te­rial infec­tion in two min­utes flat. It would quickly enable health-​​care providers to admin­ister an antibi­otic that tar­gets the spe­cific bug rather than a broad-​​spectrum drug that could be hit-​​or-​​miss. That describes the mind-​​boggling research project that Daniel Ost­berg, E’20, dis­played in Inno­va­tion Alley at RISE:2016.

Northeastern joins innovative food systems collaborative

In recog­ni­tion of its forward-​​thinking approach to food, North­eastern Dining was invited to join the Menus of Change Uni­ver­sity Research Col­lab­o­ra­tive, which pro­motes inter­dis­ci­pli­nary research and prac­tice to offer healthier, more sus­tain­able menus in dining halls across the country.

Doctoral student gets hands-​​on research experience in population health

Through Northeastern’s pop­u­la­tion health doc­toral pro­gram, Cas­sidy Griffin com­bines her doc­toral studies with research at MEDITECH, a Massachusetts-​​based health infor­ma­tion com­pany. In so doing, she is learning how to con­duct both dis­covery– and innovation-​​driven research on how pop­u­la­tion health and data ana­lytics can help orga­ni­za­tions improve effi­ciency and effec­tive­ness of health­care delivery.

Who guided the national discussion on Ferguson?

New research from two North­eastern Uni­ver­sity pro­fes­sors shows that in the days fol­lowing Michael Brown’s fatal shooting, everyday citizens—not politi­cians, celebri­ties, or other promi­nent public figures—were the ones who, using Twitter, shaped the national dialogue.

David Luzzi appointed to new dual role in leading Northeastern initiatives in security, innovation

Provost and Senior Vice Pres­i­dent for Aca­d­emic Affairs James C. Bean has appointed David Luzzi vice provost for research inno­va­tion and devel­op­ment and vice pres­i­dent for the North­eastern Uni­ver­sity Inno­va­tion Campus in Burlington, Massachusetts.

Northeastern alumna, a pioneering neuroscientist, named MacArthur Fellow

Beth Stevens, BPH’93, dis­cov­ered a key func­tion of microglia, a lesser-​​known type of brain cell, that is prompting a shift in thinking about brain devel­op­ment in healthy states as well as in neu­ro­log­ical dis­or­ders like Alzheimer’s disease.