Give thanks, and prosper

In new a paper, North­eastern psy­chology researchers chal­lenge long-​​held beliefs about patience by showing that cul­ti­vating grat­i­tude can pro­mote impulse control—which many pre­vious studies have linked to better long-​​term outcomes.

3Qs: Our fascination with mystery

Psy­chology pro­fessor John Coley dis­cusses how the need for expla­na­tion can drive society—and per­haps the media—to be con­sumed with curiosity into the unknown, like with the missing Malaysia Air­lines Flight 370.

Your face says it all? Not so fast

New research from Uni­ver­sity Dis­tin­guished Pro­fessor of Psy­chology Lisa Feldman Barrett’s lab refutes a decades-​​old belief in emo­tion science—that emo­tions are uni­ver­sally rec­og­nized across people and cultures.

Your iPhone gets emotional

Vir­tual humans, rela­tional robots, brain imaging devices, and mobile eye-​​tracking tech­nolo­gies were among the inno­v­a­tive research projects high­lighted at a day­long con­fer­ence at North­eastern that explored the inter­sec­tion of emo­tion sci­ence and technology.

Dead or alive? Researchers use uncertainty to scare

Lisa Feldman Bar­rett, Uni­ver­sity Dis­tin­guished Pro­fessor of Psy­chology, and her team at the Inter­dis­ci­pli­nary Affec­tive Sci­ence Lab­o­ra­tory use the sci­ence of emo­tion to scare people at a haunted house — and raise money for charity.

In a bad mood? Change the channel

Research sug­gests that older adults main­tain their hap­pier out­look through dif­ferent emo­tion reg­u­la­tion strate­gies. With a new grant from the National Insti­tute on Aging, asso­ciate pro­fessor Derek Isaa­cowitz will examine how our mul­ti­media choices play into that.

How chemists think

Com­plex decision-​​making requires us to select the most impor­tant infor­ma­tion and throw out the rest, according to John Coley, an asso­ciate pro­fessor of psychology.