The challenges and opportunities for women in politics

The three female polit­ical leaders who com­prised the panel for the fall semester’s first install­ment of the Women who Inspire Speaker Series, held Monday night in the Curry Stu­dent Center […]

Looking ahead: Social movements in 2015

Marches and demon­stra­tions aimed at shaping the con­ver­sa­tion around race and social inequal­i­ties cap­tured the nation’s atten­tion in 2014. Here, North­eastern assis­tant pro­fessor Sarah Jackson talks about what we’ve learned from recent activism and what we might expect in 2015.

Looking ahead: US politics in 2015

The Obama administration’s agenda, the next pres­i­den­tial cam­paign, and polit­ical behavior on social media are among the topics that assis­tant pro­fessor of polit­ical sci­ence Nick Beauchamp will be closely fol­lowing this year.

Student lands big late-​​night gig

North­eastern stu­dent Marvin McMoore is helping to shape the future of Boston’s late-​​night cul­ture as one of two-​​dozen mem­bers of a task force cre­ated to inves­ti­gate oppor­tu­ni­ties to enhance the city’s nightlife.

Grassroots experiences inspire political dreams

Leah Camp­bell, SSH’14, is finding her own niche in the polit­ical world after grass­roots expe­ri­ences at Oxfam America, the Bar­bara Lee Family Foun­da­tion and the Bar­bara Lee Polit­ical Office.

Blog:  iNSolution

You can’t shut down government text-​​mining

North­eastern Uni­ver­sity pro­fes­sors David Smith and Ryan Cordell are inter­ested in hidden social net­works. In par­tic­ular, they want to under­stand how ties between edi­tors, writers, politi­cians, busi­ness mag­nates, etc., made the […]

Music, race, and the White House

Hip-​​hop in Amer­ican cul­ture and its con­nec­tions with Barack Obama’s pres­i­dency set the stage for a thought-​​provoking panel dis­cus­sion with experts in race, music, gender studies, pop cul­ture, and politics.

Blog:  iNSolution

Polling in the new era of Italian politics

In late Feb­ruary, some­thing hap­pened to the Italian gov­ern­ment that had never hap­pened before: a hung par­lia­ment. After 75 per­cent of the pop­u­la­tion turned out to vote, it took two […]

Blog:  iNSolution

Two realities: science and the federal budget

Last week I met with asso­ciate pro­fessor of polit­ical sci­ence W. D. Kay, hoping for a primer on the fed­eral budget. I keep hearing terms like seques­tra­tion and appro­pri­a­tions and […]

Blog:  iNSolution

Guest Post: More debate analysis from Twitter

Debate season is an exciting time for pro­fessor David Lazer’s lab, and I’m delighted to be able to bring you more analysis from their team. This time, research assis­tant pro­fessor Yu-​​​​Ru […]

Blog:  iNSolution

Data for the debates

Sixty mil­lion people are expected to tune in on Wednesday night to watch the first pres­i­den­tial debate of this elec­tion season. While the debates them­selves may not deter­mine the outcome […]

3Qs: Debating the impact of ‘stand your ground’ laws

The death of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed, black teenager shot by self-​​appointed com­mu­nity watch cap­tain George Zim­merman in Florida, has sparked a tur­bu­lent nation­wide dia­logue on race and so-​​called “stand your ground” laws, which autho­rize the use of lethal force in cases of self-​​defense. On Tuesday, law pro­fessor Deb­orah Ramirez spoke at a panel con­vened by Con­gres­sional Democ­rats to address the case.

3Qs: From Tinseltown to Public Office

Having expressed an interest in run­ning for elec­tive office—perhaps as a Repub­lican can­di­date in the 2013 New York City mayor’s race—actor Kelsey Grammer may be the latest celebrity hoping to cross over to the world of pol­i­tics. We asked jour­nalism pro­fessor Alan Schroeder to weigh in on the his­tory of celebri­ties who run for office and ana­lyze the advan­tages they have over tra­di­tional candidates.

3Qs: A perilous deal for the president

Ear­lier this week, Pres­i­dent Obama signed a bill passed by Con­gress that would raise the debt ceiling and avoid default. The com­bative nego­ti­a­tions that pre­ceded the deal, how­ever, high­lighted the deep polit­ical divide in Wash­ington. We asked Robert Gilbert, the Edward W. Brooke Pro­fessor in Northeastern’s Depart­ment of Polit­ical Sci­ence, to examine the polit­ical cli­mate in light of this deal, and what it means for the 2012 elections.

Partisan politics hinders debt-​​ceiling deal

Con­gress and Pres­i­dent Obama have yet to reach an agree­ment to raise the nation’s debt ceiling, a neces­sity to ensure that the United States is able to meet its finan­cial oblig­a­tions. William Dickens, a Dis­tin­guished Pro­fessor of Eco­nomics and Social Policy at North­eastern, said that the U.S. economy could slide into depres­sion if a deal is not agreed upon by the Aug. 2 deadline.

3Qs: A political conflict ended, but still reverberating

The sesqui­cen­ten­nial of the Civil War is an oppor­tu­nity to revisit its legacy; the many ways that it con­tinues to affect our society and cul­ture. Here, Pro­fessor Bal­lard Camp­bell, an expert in Amer­ican polit­ical his­tory, dis­cusses how the polit­ical divi­sions of the 1860s con­tinue to res­onate in our pol­i­tics. Camp­bell is a Dis­tin­guished Lec­turer for the Orga­ni­za­tion of Amer­ican Historians.