The wonder of human movement

North­eastern pro­fessor Dagmar Sternad received the 50th annual Robert D. Klein Uni­ver­sity Lec­turer Award on Tuesday and dis­cussed her inter­dis­ci­pli­nary research on how the brain con­trols the human body.

Brilliant and motivated, but a good hire?

World-​​renowned net­work sci­en­tist Albert László Barabási was installed as the inau­gural Robert Gray Dodge Pro­fessor of Net­work Sci­ence on Monday, when he deliv­ered a lec­ture high­lighting his research on the “sci­ence of success.”

Particle physics goes public

North­eastern is part of an inter­na­tional con­sor­tium working to make all data from the field of high-​​energy par­ticle physics avail­able to the public.

3Qs: A new way to battle HIV

New research from physics pro­fessor Mark Williams stands to trans­form HIV/​AIDS drug dis­covery by elu­ci­dating a long-​​held paradox about the mol­e­cules that form our first line of immune defense against the virus.

You scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours

Com­mu­ni­ties with strong mutu­al­istic inter­ac­tions tend to be more resilient, according to a new study by Fil­ippo Simini, a post­doc­toral research asso­ciate in Northeastern’s Center for Com­plex Net­work Research.

Local bioterrorism as a potential global threat

In new research, net­work sci­en­tist Alessandro Vespig­nani and his team show through com­pu­ta­tional mod­eling that a hypo­thet­ical attack involving smallpox may spread to two or four coun­tries before the first cases are ever diagnosed.

A wiring diagram for disease

Baruch Barzel, a post­doc­toral researcher in world-​​renowned net­work sci­en­tist Albert-​​László Barabási’s lab, has worked out a method for map­ping the inter­ac­tions between cel­lular com­po­nents, moving the team a step closer in its quest to under­stand, pre­dict, and con­trol disease.

Validation for flu prediction

In 2009, North­eastern Uni­ver­sity net­work sci­en­tist Alessandro Vespig­nani devel­oped a com­pu­ta­tional model that pre­dicted the spread of the H1N1 virus. Three years later, new studies show that these pre­dic­tions were highly accurate.