3Qs: The legal fallout of American swimmers’ robbery claim in Brazil

Brazilian law enforce­ment offi­cials said on Thursday that the Amer­ican swim­mers who claimed to have been robbed at gun­point during the Rio de Janeiro Games had fab­ri­cated the story. We asked law pro­fessor Dan Danielsen to explain where this inter­na­tional drama might go from here, with a par­tic­ular focus on the legal con­se­quences facing the swim­mers and the tepid rela­tion­ship between Amer­ican and Brazilian officials.

3Qs: How ‘nomadic architecture’ will shape Rio’s Olympic legacy

Two venues at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro—the 12,000-seat Future Arena and the 15,000-seat Aquatic Stadium—will be dis­man­tled and rebuilt into entirely new build­ings fol­lowing the games. We asked assis­tant pro­fessor David Fannon, an archi­tect and building sci­en­tist, to explain how Rio’s reliance on “nomadic archi­tec­ture” might ben­efit Brazil in the decades to come.

3Qs: What is greatness—and how do you achieve it?

More than 11,000 ath­letes are com­peting at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, show­casing their supe­rior skill in nearly 40 dif­ferent sports. We asked Rachel Rodgers, asso­ciate pro­fessor in the Depart­ment of Applied Psy­chology, to define the con­cept of great­ness and explain how everyday people might tap into their own great­ness, regard­less of wealth, fame, or skill set.

3Qs: Why better infrastructure could solve Rio’s water problems

The Olympic sailing com­pe­ti­tion began on Monday in Rio de Janeiro’s Gua­n­abara Bay, the site of exten­sive water pol­lu­tion that offi­cials have warned is a health risk for the ath­letes. Here, Geoff Trussell, director of Northeastern’s Marine Sci­ence Center, explains how bad the pol­lu­tion can be for the aquatic ecosystem and what needs to be done to fix the problem.

3Qs: The ‘perfect storm’ that led to Brazil’s drastic and rapid decline

The state of Brazil in 2009, when Rio de Janeiro was awarded the Summer Olympics, stands in stark con­trast to the state of the nation today. As the world turns its focus to Rio for tonight’s Opening Cer­e­monies, asso­ciate pro­fessor Thomas Vicino explains Brazil’s change of fortune.

Underreporting of Zika is rife; researchers project epidemic’s spread

A team led by North­eastern pro­fessor Alessandro Vespig­nani responded to a “call to arms” to model the spread of the Zika virus, revealing the dis­parity between the number of reported cases and the number of pro­jected cases of this largely asymp­to­matic dis­ease. The results will help coun­tries in the Amer­icas plan a response.

Take 5: The science of doping in sports

Reports of doping by Russia’s Olympic ath­letes con­tinue to grab head­lines. Just yes­terday, offi­cials con­firmed that 14 of the country’s ath­letes from the 2008 Games had been impli­cated by the I.O.C. in a re-​​testing of sam­ples. But doping in sports is not new. As early as the 8th cen­tury B.C., Greek ath­letes found ways to boost testos­terone to enhance per­for­mance, says Northeastern’s Rui Li, an expert on exer­cise phys­i­ology. Here, she talks about the sci­ence of doping and pos­sible mea­sures to stop it.