New book examines the emotional power of Emily Dickinson’s poetry

In her new book, Eng­lish pro­fessor Mary Loef­fel­holz argues that Emily Dickinson’s poems con­tinue to live on in the hearts and minds of readers due largely to their ability to com­fort those in times of sorrow. “She was a master of extending con­so­la­tion and recog­ni­tion to people in the wake of death,” Loef­fel­holz explains, “a master of acknowl­edging it, grieving it, and expressing it.”

Students, faculty praise global experience at Dialogue of Civilizations Fair

The most amazing thing I have ever done.” That’s how senior Christa Blomquist described her Dia­logue of Civ­i­liza­tions pro­gram in Ice­land. At Thursday’s annual dia­logue fair, she was among the stu­dents and fac­ulty who extolled the virtues of living, working, and studying in an unfa­miliar country.

Dean charts bold vision for College of Engineering

Growing up in France, Nadine Aubry knew that she wanted to har­ness the power of engi­neering to make a pos­i­tive impact on the world. Now, as dean of the Col­lege of Engi­neering, she is shaping the future of engi­neering edu­ca­tion while being rec­og­nized for her achieve­ments through pres­ti­gious appoint­ments and major awards.

ABC News political analyst to examine the 2016 campaign and the future of US politics during campus visit

ABC News chief polit­ical ana­lyst Matthew Dowd will address the numerous ways in which the 2016 elec­tion is trans­forming Amer­ican pol­i­tics. The inter­ac­tive discussion—“Election 2016: Where do we go from here?”—will take place on Friday at noon in Blackman Audi­to­rium and also will be shown live on Facebook.

3Qs: Why Bluetooth headphones are better than you might think

Apple cre­ated a stir when it announced it had elim­i­nated the head­phone jack from its latest iPhone model, pushing many users to wire­less head­phones. Here, Tom­maso Melodia, director of Northeastern’s Wire­less Net­works and Embedded Sys­tems Lab­o­ra­tory, explains the sci­ence behind Blue­tooth head­phones and how their quality com­pares to wired devices.

3Qs: Do newspapers’ presidential endorsements even matter?

If the out­come of the 2016 pres­i­den­tial elec­tion were based on news­paper endorse­ments, then Hillary Clinton would beat Donald Trump in a his­toric land­slide. But Dan Kennedy, asso­ciate pro­fessor of jour­nalism, doesn’t think that endorse­ments will have much sway over voters on Elec­tion Day, and says “such endorse­ments are more an expres­sion of values than a gen­uine attempt to per­suade voters to change their minds.”

New psychology professor studies link between physical activity, cognitive health

Chuck Hillman prac­tices what he preaches, applying his research find­ings to his per­sonal life. When he’s not studying the rela­tion­ship between phys­ical activity and cog­ni­tive health, he’s biking, playing ice hockey, or lifting weights in his home gym.

New professor has made crime prevention his life’s work

Anthony Braga, newly appointed Dis­tin­guished Pro­fessor and director of the School of Crim­i­nology and Crim­inal Jus­tice, has been working in con­junc­tion with the Boston Police Depart­ment for more than 20 years, ana­lyzing poli­cies and devel­oping pro­grams aimed at reducing the city’s vio­lent crime rate.

Recent graduate shines investigative light on 75-​​year-​​old civil rights cold case

Pvt. Felix Hall, a 19-​​year-​​old African Amer­ican from Mill­brook, Alabama, was lynched in the woods of Fort Ben­ning, Georgia, in 1941. More than 70 years later, Alexa Mills dug into the case as part of her course work in the School of Journalism’s Media Inno­va­tion pro­gram and then wrote a front-​​page fea­ture on her find­ings for The Wash­ington Post.

3Qs: How safe are US airports?

The Trans­porta­tion Secu­rity Admin­is­tra­tion is finding more firearms than ever at air­port check­points. Is this a sign that the TSA is doing its job or an indi­ca­tion that more trav­elers are trying to board planes with these weapons in their bags? And what about “insider threats” among air­port per­sonnel? We asked an expert.

3Qs: Discovery of Earth-​​like planet suggests ‘we might not be alone’

A newly dis­cov­ered planet called Proxima b is tan­ta­liz­ingly close to Earth and lies within the right dis­tance of its star to sup­port life. For Cor­dula Robinson, asso­ciate teaching pro­fessor in the Geospa­tial Infor­ma­tion Tech­nology pro­gram, the dis­covery sug­gests that “life out­side of our solar system is a pos­si­bility.” Here, she explains why all of us should take note of our nearest inter­stellar neighbor.