3Qs: Do newspapers’ presidential endorsements even matter?

If the out­come of the 2016 pres­i­den­tial elec­tion were based on news­paper endorse­ments, then Hillary Clinton would beat Donald Trump in a his­toric land­slide. But Dan Kennedy, asso­ciate pro­fessor of jour­nalism, doesn’t think that endorse­ments will have much sway over voters on Elec­tion Day, and says “such endorse­ments are more an expres­sion of values than a gen­uine attempt to per­suade voters to change their minds.”

New psychology professor studies link between physical activity, cognitive health

Chuck Hillman prac­tices what he preaches, applying his research find­ings to his per­sonal life. When he’s not studying the rela­tion­ship between phys­ical activity and cog­ni­tive health, he’s biking, playing ice hockey, or lifting weights in his home gym.

New professor has made crime prevention his life’s work

Anthony Braga, newly appointed Dis­tin­guished Pro­fessor and director of the School of Crim­i­nology and Crim­inal Jus­tice, has been working in con­junc­tion with the Boston Police Depart­ment for more than 20 years, ana­lyzing poli­cies and devel­oping pro­grams aimed at reducing the city’s vio­lent crime rate.

Recent graduate shines investigative light on 75-​​year-​​old civil rights cold case

Pvt. Felix Hall, a 19-​​year-​​old African Amer­ican from Mill­brook, Alabama, was lynched in the woods of Fort Ben­ning, Georgia, in 1941. More than 70 years later, Alexa Mills dug into the case as part of her course work in the School of Journalism’s Media Inno­va­tion pro­gram and then wrote a front-​​page fea­ture on her find­ings for The Wash­ington Post.

3Qs: How safe are US airports?

The Trans­porta­tion Secu­rity Admin­is­tra­tion is finding more firearms than ever at air­port check­points. Is this a sign that the TSA is doing its job or an indi­ca­tion that more trav­elers are trying to board planes with these weapons in their bags? And what about “insider threats” among air­port per­sonnel? We asked an expert.

3Qs: Discovery of Earth-​​like planet suggests ‘we might not be alone’

A newly dis­cov­ered planet called Proxima b is tan­ta­liz­ingly close to Earth and lies within the right dis­tance of its star to sup­port life. For Cor­dula Robinson, asso­ciate teaching pro­fessor in the Geospa­tial Infor­ma­tion Tech­nology pro­gram, the dis­covery sug­gests that “life out­side of our solar system is a pos­si­bility.” Here, she explains why all of us should take note of our nearest inter­stellar neighbor.

3Qs: Exploration and collaboration are taking gaming to the next level

Two of the most unique—and poten­tially revolutionary—games of all-​​time were released this summer, in “Pokémon Go” and “No Man’s Sky.” The seem­ingly very dif­ferent games share a striking sim­i­larity that says a lot about the future of the gaming industry. Here, Casper Harteveld, assis­tant pro­fessor of game design, explains why.

3Qs: Will states follow Feds’ lead on phasing out private prisons?

The Jus­tice Depart­ment will be phasing out the use of pri­vate prisons, citing safety con­cerns as well as their lack of reha­bil­i­ta­tive ser­vices. We asked Natasha Frost, a mass incar­cer­a­tion expert, to explain how this direc­tive might affect for-​​profit prisons at the state level and whether the pres­i­den­tial elec­tion could impact the DOJ’s new policy.

3Qs: The legal fallout of American swimmers’ robbery claim in Brazil

Brazilian law enforce­ment offi­cials said on Thursday that the Amer­ican swim­mers who claimed to have been robbed at gun­point during the Rio de Janeiro Games had fab­ri­cated the story. We asked law pro­fessor Dan Danielsen to explain where this inter­na­tional drama might go from here, with a par­tic­ular focus on the legal con­se­quences facing the swim­mers and the tepid rela­tion­ship between Amer­ican and Brazilian officials.

The life and career of an engineering ‘genius’

Beaten by the KGB, branded an anti-​​Soviet activist, and black­balled from acad­emia, Alexander Gorlov fled the Soviet Union, immi­grating to America, where he joined the North­eastern fac­ulty in 1976. Gorlov died in June at the age of 85, leaving behind an impres­sive legacy of inven­tion and cre­ativity, including a tur­bine that gar­nered him inter­na­tional acclaim.

3Qs: How to tame the Twitter haters

A score of Twitter users were banned by the social media ser­vice last week for hurling a spate of vile remarks at Ghost­busters star Leslie Jones. To find out how online anonymity affects the way people act toward each other and what social media sites like Twitter could do to curb tar­geted attacks, we turned to North­eastern assis­tant pro­fessor Joseph Reagle, an expert on internet trolling.

3Qs: What can a crime drama teach us about justice?

Law pro­fessor Jes­sica Silbey will dis­cuss the his­tory of law in Amer­ican film on Wednesday at a Law Library of Con­gress event. Here, she looks at the pit­falls of crime shows, names her favorite legal drama, and explains how the depic­tion of law in film has changed over the past 125 years.