Hot and bothered: climate change and the ecology of fear

When ani­mals must bal­ance the fear of being eaten with their own need to feed, their deci­sions affect the whole ecosystem. New research from North­eastern pro­fessor Geoff Trussell, who directs Northeastern’s Marine Sci­ence Center, sug­gests this effect is even more pro­nounced under future cli­mate change scenarios.

Stuck in the middle with oysters and crabs

New research from marine sci­en­tists at North­eastern shows that the behavior of middle preda­tors in marine food webs plays an impor­tant role in the wel­fare of the whole system—and that, like our behavior, middle predator behavior is pretty fickle.

Blog:  iNSolution

Making whoopee, coral style

When it comes to making babies, most species pick a strategy and stick with it. Humans, for example, are per­fectly happy with our sexual mode of repro­duc­tion: Half the DNA […]

You scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours

Com­mu­ni­ties with strong mutu­al­istic inter­ac­tions tend to be more resilient, according to a new study by Fil­ippo Simini, a post­doc­toral research asso­ciate in Northeastern’s Center for Com­plex Net­work Research.