Highway of dreams for microbiologists

A few years ago, biol­o­gists Slava Epstein and Yoshiteru Aoi fan­ta­sized about a device that would work like a highway lane clo­sure to iso­late pure bac­te­rial sam­ples from the envi­ron­ment. They teamed with assis­tant pro­fessor of chem­ical engi­neering Ed Goluch to make their dream a reality.

Blog:  iNSolution

Guest post: The a-​​capella-​​singing salamander scientist

Today’s guest post comes to you from the capable hands of blos­soming sci­ence writer Gwen Schanker, AMD’18. Schanker just com­pleted her first year at North­eastern, where she studies jour­nalism and […]

Why bacteria are beautiful, and why we need them

Nobel lau­reate Sir Richard Roberts, recently appointed Dis­tin­guished Uni­ver­sity Pro­fessor in the Col­lege of Sci­ence, dis­cussed his love for bac­teria and their sym­biosis with people on Monday after­noon at his inau­gural lec­ture, after which he con­versed with Pres­i­dent Joseph E. Aoun.

Blog:  iNSolution

Making whoopee, coral style

When it comes to making babies, most species pick a strategy and stick with it. Humans, for example, are per­fectly happy with our sexual mode of repro­duc­tion: Half the DNA […]

You scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours

Com­mu­ni­ties with strong mutu­al­istic inter­ac­tions tend to be more resilient, according to a new study by Fil­ippo Simini, a post­doc­toral research asso­ciate in Northeastern’s Center for Com­plex Net­work Research.

A wiring diagram for disease

Baruch Barzel, a post­doc­toral researcher in world-​​renowned net­work sci­en­tist Albert-​​László Barabási’s lab, has worked out a method for map­ping the inter­ac­tions between cel­lular com­po­nents, moving the team a step closer in its quest to under­stand, pre­dict, and con­trol disease.