Why bacteria are beautiful, and why we need them

Nobel lau­reate Sir Richard Roberts, recently appointed Dis­tin­guished Uni­ver­sity Pro­fessor in the Col­lege of Sci­ence, dis­cussed his love for bac­teria and their sym­biosis with people on Monday after­noon at his inau­gural lec­ture, after which he con­versed with Pres­i­dent Joseph E. Aoun.

Ancient bacteria go under the lens

Cyanobac­teria, which are respon­sible for pro­ducing a quarter of the earth’s breath­able oxygen, are nearly 3 bil­lion years old, but they’ve yet to be well under­stood on a genetic level. Asso­ciate pro­fessor Jacque­line Piret aims to change that.

You scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours

Com­mu­ni­ties with strong mutu­al­istic inter­ac­tions tend to be more resilient, according to a new study by Fil­ippo Simini, a post­doc­toral research asso­ciate in Northeastern’s Center for Com­plex Net­work Research.

A wiring diagram for disease

Baruch Barzel, a post­doc­toral researcher in world-​​renowned net­work sci­en­tist Albert-​​László Barabási’s lab, has worked out a method for map­ping the inter­ac­tions between cel­lular com­po­nents, moving the team a step closer in its quest to under­stand, pre­dict, and con­trol disease.

Lego robots go for the gold

North­eastern doc­toral can­di­date Daniel Blus­tein devel­oped a cur­riculum to intro­duce middle school stu­dents to bio­mimetic sci­ence, the focus of his own research.

Study: Antibiotics are unique assassins

In recent years, the notion that there is a single mech­a­nism by which antibi­otics wipe out bac­teria has per­me­ated the field of micro­bi­ology. Now, new research from pro­fessor Kim Lewis and his team ques­tions that hypothesis.

How to start a termite ‘orgy’

In new research, Rebeca Rosen­gaus, an asso­ciate pro­fessor in the depart­ment of marine and envi­ron­mental sci­ences, and her stu­dent Tamara Hartke turn an old theory of ter­mite behavior on its head.