Marine Science Center works to protect oceans’ ‘vital role in sustaining life on Earth’

In honor of World Oceans Day, we spoke with Marine Sci­ence Center director Geoff Trussell about ocean con­ser­va­tion and what the MSC is doing to help pro­tect our marine ecosystem.

Three ways the Northeastern community is addressing ocean plastics pollution

A big emphasis of World Oceans Day this year is bringing aware­ness to the problem of marine plastic pol­lu­tion. Mem­bers of the North­eastern com­mu­nity are already focused on this chal­lenge by building sus­tain­able skate­boards, visu­al­izing ocean plas­tics data, and building sen­sors to iden­tify microplas­tics in the sea.

How serious is the threat posed by new ‘superbug’?

Reports of the arrival in the U.S. of a new superbug that is resis­tant to an antibi­otic of last resort have set off alarm bells among public health offi­cials. Last year, a team led by North­eastern pro­fessor Kim Lewis dis­cov­ered teixobactin, an antibi­otic that elim­i­nates bac­teria without encoun­tering any detectable resis­tance. We asked him to explain the new superbug, how wor­ried we should be, and how it might be stopped.

Chemical engineering professor moonlights as webcomic artist

In 2008, Lucas Land­herr cre­ated a slice-​​of-​​life web­comic called “Sur­viving the World” as a way to “main­tain his sanity” while he worked toward becoming a pro­fessor. Today, his comic series—as well as his pen­chant for idio­syn­cratic humor—is shaping his pro­fes­sional life in ways that he never could have imagined.

Northeastern researchers find that Amazon might not always be pitching you the best prices

A team led by Northeastern’s Christo Wilson shows that Amazon is much more likely to point buyers to sellers who use an auto­mated prac­tice called algo­rithmic pricing, even though those sellers’ prices may be higher than others’.

PhD student to study water access and control in Uganda through interviews—and equations

Matt Simonson got his under­grad­uate degree in math and inter­na­tional studies, but wasn’t sure they could be used together. That was until he found Northeastern’s first-​​in-​​the-​​nation doc­toral pro­gram in net­work science—and now he’s using math to under­stand human rela­tion­ships and tackle global challenges.

Researchers mine Twitter to reveal Congress’ ideological divide on climate change

Senate Democ­rats are three times more likely to follow science-​​related Twitter accounts than their Repub­lican peers, according to a new study led by Northeastern’s Brian Hel­muth. The research shows the growing divide between par­ties on the issue of cli­mate change, but also pro­vides hope, says Hel­muth, pointing to indi­vid­uals who cross the aisle and bridge the gap.

Take 5: The science of doping in sports

Reports of doping by Russia’s Olympic ath­letes con­tinue to grab head­lines. Just yes­terday, offi­cials con­firmed that 14 of the country’s ath­letes from the 2008 Games had been impli­cated by the I.O.C. in a re-​​testing of sam­ples. But doping in sports is not new. As early as the 8th cen­tury B.C., Greek ath­letes found ways to boost testos­terone to enhance per­for­mance, says Northeastern’s Rui Li, an expert on exer­cise phys­i­ology. Here, she talks about the sci­ence of doping and pos­sible mea­sures to stop it.

Researchers reveal inconsistent borders in online maps

Google and Bing maps of some coun­tries show users dif­ferent bor­ders based on where the users live. It’s how gov­ern­ments claim sov­er­eignty over dis­puted bor­ders. Researchers led by Northeastern’s Christo Wilson have devel­oped a com­put­er­ized system to reveal the manip­u­la­tions: It crawls online maps con­tin­u­ously, tracking and recording every border shift over time.

As Canada wildfires rage, faculty experts examine the ramifications

Wild­fires con­tinue to rage for a third week in and around the city of Fort McMurray in Canada’s Alberta province, the country’s oil-​​sands cap­ital. Some 96,000 people have been evac­u­ated from the area and 2,400 build­ings have been destroyed. We spoke with three North­eastern experts who share insight into how the cat­a­strophe will affect cli­mate change, the likely impact on U.S. con­sumers, and how the Fort McMurray com­mu­nity can recover.

CCIS dean’s own path spurs drive to increase student opportunities

Carla Brodley started col­lege as an eco­nomics major. She fin­ished with a double major in math and com­puter sci­ence, the result of a pro­gram­ming course she took during her sopho­more year. Brodley, the dean of the Col­lege of Com­puter and Infor­ma­tion Sci­ence, is being rec­og­nized Tuesday with a national men­toring award for her leading efforts to increase oppor­tu­ni­ties for students—particularly women and under­rep­re­sented groups.

Dean’s Medal recipient blends Pentagon experience with doctoral studies

Blurb: Through Northeastern’s Doctor of Law and Policy pro­gram, Hunter Hustus brought a crit­ical real-​​world chal­lenge from his work­place to his studies. That chal­lenge involved nuclear deter­rence decision-​​making, and his work­place is the Pen­tagon. At a hooding cer­e­mony last week, Hustus received the Dean’s Medal for Out­standing Doc­toral Work, the highest award pre­sented by the Col­lege of Pro­fes­sional Studies to doc­toral candidates.