Fear not: The number of locally transmitted cases of Zika in US to be very small

North­eastern researchers project the prob­a­bility of locally trans­mitted Zika cases out­side of Florida to be extremely low, ‘just one or two.’ Much of the U.S. has no mos­qui­toes with Zika and will remain unaffected.

3Qs: What the Lochte saga can teach us about branding

After get­ting dropped by all his major spon­sors, Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte signed a new endorse­ment deal with a little-​​known cough drop com­pany. It’s a poten­tially low-​​risk, high-​​reward move for both the ath­lete and the brand, says pro­fessor Bruce Clark.

EpiPen’s pricing debacle and its impact on patients, insurers

A firestorm erupted this week in response to the phar­ma­ceu­tical com­pany Mylan’s sharp increase in the price of its EpiPen, a life-​​saving treat­ment for severe allergic reac­tions. The com­pany quickly back­tracked, announcing a rebate plan. Here, three North­eastern fac­ulty members—pharmacist Tayla Rose, health­care finance expert Steven Pizer, and health policy researcher Gary Young—explain the clin­ical, eco­nomic, and policy impli­ca­tions of the controversy.

Chew on this: How we believe our meat is raised can influence how it tastes

New research from North­eastern psy­chology pro­fessor Lisa Feldman Bar­rett shows that our beliefs about how farm ani­mals are raised—whether on “fac­tory farms” or in more humane conditions—can shape our meat-​​eating expe­ri­ence, from how we think it smells and tastes to how much we’d be willing to pay for it. “We show that what you feel very directly influ­ences not only how you inter­pret what you see but also very lit­er­ally what you see,” Bar­rett said.

Researchers work to ‘predict’ the future of transit

Through work with London’s transit system, pro­fessor Haris Kout­sopoulos and a doc­toral stu­dent are devel­oping real-​​time pre­dic­tive models to fore­cast the ebbs and flows of transit activity. The tools could aid transit oper­a­tors with real-​​time system man­age­ment and help com­muters avoid crowded sta­tions or trains.

Research sheds new light on proton behavior, draws praise from science community

A dis­covery by a research team led by Northeastern’s Paul Cham­pion upends the under­standing held for cen­turies of pro­tons’ behavior. The researchers—using an ultra­fast pulsed laser system designed at Northeastern—have revealed that pro­tons actu­ally tunnel through ther­mo­dy­namic bar­riers rather than travel over them. Sci­ence mag­a­zine, struck by the results, high­lighted the research in its “Editor’s Choice” column.

Influence of Young Scholars Program reverberates through time

As a rising high school senior, assis­tant pro­fessor Matthew Eck­elman, spent a summer at North­eastern sim­u­lating earth­quakes on a shaker table to eval­uate the sta­bility of land­fill liner sys­tems. Twenty-​​one years later, he’s come full circle, hosting young scholars in his lab, guiding them toward STEM careers.

3Qs: The cat-​​and-​​mouse game of blocking digital ads

If you were using Face­book on a desktop last week, you may have noticed that your ad-​​blocking soft­ware was being blocked. That was a move by Face­book. We asked two North­eastern pro­fes­sors to explain how new strate­gies and tech­nolo­gies are changing the dig­ital land­scape for users, con­tent providers, and advertisers.

What’s that bruise on Michael Phelps’ shoulder?

From cir­cular bruises, to col­orful tapes, to one-​​arm sleeves, Olympic ath­letes have been sporting some unique mark­ings and add-​​ons during the Rio de Janeiro Games. We asked a group of pro­fes­sors to explain what you’ve been seeing, with a par­tic­ular focus on the sci­ence behind it.

3Qs: What is greatness—and how do you achieve it?

More than 11,000 ath­letes are com­peting at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, show­casing their supe­rior skill in nearly 40 dif­ferent sports. We asked Rachel Rodgers, asso­ciate pro­fessor in the Depart­ment of Applied Psy­chology, to define the con­cept of great­ness and explain how everyday people might tap into their own great­ness, regard­less of wealth, fame, or skill set.