3Qs: The legal fallout of American swimmers’ robbery claim in Brazil

Brazilian law enforce­ment offi­cials said on Thursday that the Amer­ican swim­mers who claimed to have been robbed at gun­point during the Rio de Janeiro Games had fab­ri­cated the story. We asked law pro­fessor Dan Danielsen to explain where this inter­na­tional drama might go from here, with a par­tic­ular focus on the legal con­se­quences facing the swim­mers and the tepid rela­tion­ship between Amer­ican and Brazilian officials.

3Qs: How ‘nomadic architecture’ will shape Rio’s Olympic legacy

Two venues at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro—the 12,000-seat Future Arena and the 15,000-seat Aquatic Stadium—will be dis­man­tled and rebuilt into entirely new build­ings fol­lowing the games. We asked assis­tant pro­fessor David Fannon, an archi­tect and building sci­en­tist, to explain how Rio’s reliance on “nomadic archi­tec­ture” might ben­efit Brazil in the decades to come.

The life and career of an engineering ‘genius’

Beaten by the KGB, branded an anti-​​Soviet activist, and black­balled from acad­emia, Alexander Gorlov fled the Soviet Union, immi­grating to America, where he joined the North­eastern fac­ulty in 1976. Gorlov died in June at the age of 85, leaving behind an impres­sive legacy of inven­tion and cre­ativity, including a tur­bine that gar­nered him inter­na­tional acclaim.

Women’s powerlifting club wins sport’s world cup

The team pushed and pulled its way to a dom­i­nating vic­tory in the Inter­na­tional Pow­er­lifting Federation’s inau­gural Uni­ver­sity Pow­er­lifting World Cup, which was held in Belarus last week. “I couldn’t be more proud of how the team per­formed,” said club cap­tain Kelsey McCarthy. “It shows how hard we trained and how com­mitted we were.”

The terror in Nice and security across the EU

France is reeling from its third major attack in 19 months after a lone ter­rorist sped a truck into a crowd of people gath­ered to watch Bastille Day fire­works. The attack killed at least 84 people and injured more than 200 others. We asked North­eastern experts to ana­lyze these types of “lone wolf” ter­rorist attacks, the media’s use of graphic footage from the scene, and what the terror in Nice could mean for the Euro­pean Union’s secu­rity procedures.

3Qs: Will ‘superbug’ in Rio’s waters harm Olympic athletes?

A new study from a team of Brazilian sci­en­tists has found that a drug-​​resistant bac­terium has been growing off two city beaches bor­dering Gua­n­abara Bay, where Olympic sailors will com­pete next month. We asked Daniel Faber, pro­fessor of soci­ology and director of Northeastern’s Envi­ron­mental Jus­tice Research Col­lab­o­ra­tive, to dis­cuss the social, polit­ical, and sci­en­tific impli­ca­tions of the findings.

Women’s powerlifting club to compete for sport’s world cup

Seven mem­bers of Northeastern’s pow­er­lifting club will show­case their strength, deter­mi­na­tion, and no-​​quit atti­tude at the inau­gural Uni­ver­sity Pow­er­lifting World Cup in Belarus next week. “This is a once-​​in-​​a-​​lifetime oppor­tu­nity and I’m looking for­ward to rep­re­senting the U.S.,” says Bin­glei Zhou, a second-​​year pow­er­lifter on the team who holds the country’s col­le­giate dead­lifting record.

How to make the most out of your international co-​​op

Many North­eastern stu­dents are about to begin their first inter­na­tional co-​​op. To help them max­i­mize their expe­ri­ences, we asked six stu­dents who have done global co-​​ops to share the wisdom they’ve cul­ti­vated from having lived and worked abroad.

Life after Brexit

Britain voted to leave the Euro­pean Union on Thursday, prompting Prime Min­ister David Cameron to announce his intent to resign and sending global mar­kets into a tail­spin. Here, Mai’a K. Davis Cross, assis­tant pro­fessor of polit­ical sci­ence and inter­na­tional affairs, explains what the British exit might mean for the EU and the U.K. going forward.

What Brexit could mean for Europe

The United Kingdom will hold a ref­er­endum on Thursday on whether Britain should leave the Euro­pean Union. If there is high voter turnout, “there is no ques­tion that the ‘remain’ side will easily win,” pre­dicts Northeastern’s Mai’a K. Davis Cross, an expert on Euro­pean pol­i­tics. Cross also cau­tions that a vote to leave could also “trigger the breakup of the United Kingdom.”