3Qs: New GMO labeling law brings controversy, confusion

North­eastern pro­fessor and food policy expert Chris Bosso says there are honest argu­ments on each side of the debate over whether to label foods as having genet­i­cally mod­i­fied ingre­di­ents. But he notes the new bill, signed into law last week, is “a poor solu­tion to a com­plex problem.”

Russian athlete ban, not Rio prep, to be 2016 Olympics’ legacy

The 2016 Summer Olympics are finally here, opening this week in Rio de Janeiro amid a plethora of con­cerns, including the Zika virus, water con­t­a­m­i­na­tion, and civil unrest. Here, Olympics expert and asso­ciate teaching pro­fessor Philip D’Agati explains what we can expect and says of the city, “Their plan­ning hasn’t been that bad.”

3Qs: The strategy of selecting a vice presidential candidate

After weeks of intense public spec­u­la­tion, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton intro­duced their vice pres­i­den­tial can­di­dates. That got us won­dering how pres­i­den­tial hope­fuls select their run­ning mates and whether those selec­tions typ­i­cally impact elec­tions. Here, Bill Crotty, pro­fessor emer­itus and an expert on pres­i­den­tial pol­i­tics, exam­ines those questions.

How the Democratic Party’s email fiasco will affect the presidential race

The release of nearly 20,000 Demo­c­ratic National Com­mittee emails by Wik­ileaks on Friday cre­ated havoc within the party and forced the res­ig­na­tion of DNC head Debbie Wasserman Schultz. Rumors of Russia’s alleged involve­ment in the data breech added fur­ther intrigue to the story. We asked three North­eastern experts to weigh in on how the data dump will impact the elec­tion, the voting process, and the cyber­se­cu­rity of polit­ical parties.

Women’s powerlifting club wins sport’s world cup

The team pushed and pulled its way to a dom­i­nating vic­tory in the Inter­na­tional Pow­er­lifting Federation’s inau­gural Uni­ver­sity Pow­er­lifting World Cup, which was held in Belarus last week. “I couldn’t be more proud of how the team per­formed,” said club cap­tain Kelsey McCarthy. “It shows how hard we trained and how com­mitted we were.”

The terror in Nice and security across the EU

France is reeling from its third major attack in 19 months after a lone ter­rorist sped a truck into a crowd of people gath­ered to watch Bastille Day fire­works. The attack killed at least 84 people and injured more than 200 others. We asked North­eastern experts to ana­lyze these types of “lone wolf” ter­rorist attacks, the media’s use of graphic footage from the scene, and what the terror in Nice could mean for the Euro­pean Union’s secu­rity procedures.

3Qs: Why for-​​profit prisons are on the rise

Pri­vate prisons are a par­tic­u­larly hot topic these days, the set­ting of the Net­flix dramedy Orange is the New Black and the sub­ject of a recent 35,000-word Mother Jones exposé. Here, Natasha Frost, asso­ciate pro­fessor in Northeastern’s School of Crim­i­nology and Crim­inal Jus­tice, explains how for-​​profit prisons are changing the crim­inal jus­tice system.

3Qs: Will ‘superbug’ in Rio’s waters harm Olympic athletes?

A new study from a team of Brazilian sci­en­tists has found that a drug-​​resistant bac­terium has been growing off two city beaches bor­dering Gua­n­abara Bay, where Olympic sailors will com­pete next month. We asked Daniel Faber, pro­fessor of soci­ology and director of Northeastern’s Envi­ron­mental Jus­tice Research Col­lab­o­ra­tive, to dis­cuss the social, polit­ical, and sci­en­tific impli­ca­tions of the findings.

In Slovenia, Northeastern students present research on international criminal tribunal

Inspired by an expe­ri­ence on a Dia­logue of Civ­i­liza­tions pro­gram in 2014, a group of stu­dents exam­ined whether there is inherent bias in the Inter­na­tional Crim­inal Tri­bunal for the former Yugoslavia, which han­dles war crimes stem­ming from the con­flicts in the Balkans in the early 1990s.

Survey finds youth in Boston summer jobs program gain job readiness skills, higher academic aspirations

After youth par­tic­i­pated in Boston’s summer jobs pro­gram, a greater number reported having job readi­ness skills, higher aca­d­emic aspi­ra­tions, and improved con­nec­tions with their neighborhoods—with the largest gains in some areas among minority groups—according to a new report co-​​authored by Northeastern’s Alicia Sasser Modestino.

How to make the most out of your international co-​​op

Many North­eastern stu­dents are about to begin their first inter­na­tional co-​​op. To help them max­i­mize their expe­ri­ences, we asked six stu­dents who have done global co-​​ops to share the wisdom they’ve cul­ti­vated from having lived and worked abroad.

Life after Brexit

Britain voted to leave the Euro­pean Union on Thursday, prompting Prime Min­ister David Cameron to announce his intent to resign and sending global mar­kets into a tail­spin. Here, Mai’a K. Davis Cross, assis­tant pro­fessor of polit­ical sci­ence and inter­na­tional affairs, explains what the British exit might mean for the EU and the U.K. going forward.