Social insects put the ‘I’ in team to fight disease

New research from asso­ciate pro­fessor Rebeca Rosen­gaus con­firms ant larvae have retained their indi­vidual immune sys­tems throughout evo­lu­tion, which she said could help explain why social insects are geo­graph­i­cally wide­spread and eco­log­i­cally dominant.

A kid in a network shop

Baruch Barzel, a post-​​doctoral research asso­ciate in the Center for Com­plex Net­work Sci­ence, answers some of the most fun­da­mental ques­tions about com­plex net­works. The answers sur­prised even him.

A new era for human fertility research

In 2004, Jon Tilly, pro­fessor and chair of the Depart­ment of Biology, over­turned the par­a­digm that female mam­mals do not pro­duce new egg cells after birth. His dis­covery has opened the flood­gates for new clin­ical approaches to combat infer­tility and per­haps even stave off menopause.

Deep water data

Two new fac­ulty based at the Marine Sci­ence Center are har­vesting data from the ocean to under­stand how global change has impacted its ecosys­tems and will con­tinue to do so in the future.

In a bad mood? Change the channel

Research sug­gests that older adults main­tain their hap­pier out­look through dif­ferent emo­tion reg­u­la­tion strate­gies. With a new grant from the National Insti­tute on Aging, asso­ciate pro­fessor Derek Isaa­cowitz will examine how our mul­ti­media choices play into that.

You scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours

Com­mu­ni­ties with strong mutu­al­istic inter­ac­tions tend to be more resilient, according to a new study by Fil­ippo Simini, a post­doc­toral research asso­ciate in Northeastern’s Center for Com­plex Net­work Research.

Snails have a thing for sexy stems

Assis­tant pro­fessor Ran­dall Hughes exam­ines the envi­ron­mental impli­ca­tions of peri­winkle snails’ pref­er­ence for climbing sex­u­ally repro­duc­tive marsh grasses as opposed to veg­e­ta­tive ones.