3Qs: What can a crime drama teach us about justice?

Law pro­fessor Jes­sica Silbey will dis­cuss the his­tory of law in Amer­ican film on Wednesday at a Law Library of Con­gress event. Here, she looks at the pit­falls of crime shows, names her favorite legal drama, and explains how the depic­tion of law in film has changed over the past 125 years.

3Qs: Why for-​​profit prisons are on the rise

Pri­vate prisons are a par­tic­u­larly hot topic these days, the set­ting of the Net­flix dramedy Orange is the New Black and the sub­ject of a recent 35,000-word Mother Jones exposé. Here, Natasha Frost, asso­ciate pro­fessor in Northeastern’s School of Crim­i­nology and Crim­inal Jus­tice, explains how for-​​profit prisons are changing the crim­inal jus­tice system.

3Qs: Will ‘superbug’ in Rio’s waters harm Olympic athletes?

A new study from a team of Brazilian sci­en­tists has found that a drug-​​resistant bac­terium has been growing off two city beaches bor­dering Gua­n­abara Bay, where Olympic sailors will com­pete next month. We asked Daniel Faber, pro­fessor of soci­ology and director of Northeastern’s Envi­ron­mental Jus­tice Research Col­lab­o­ra­tive, to dis­cuss the social, polit­ical, and sci­en­tific impli­ca­tions of the findings.

3Qs: Trapped in social media ‘echo chambers’

Social media has become a go-​​to plat­form for people to express their opin­ions on the hot topics of the day. But in many cases, people are sharing those thoughts with those who have sim­ilar opin­ions. Here, assis­tant pro­fessor Brooke Fou­cault Welles explains how this trend cor­re­lates to offline debates.

3Qs: SCOTUS rejects affirmative action challenge

In a win for affir­ma­tive action advo­cates, the Supreme Court on Thursday rejected a chal­lenge to a pro­gram at the Uni­ver­sity of Texas that con­siders race as a lim­ited factor in admis­sions deci­sions. Dan Urman, assis­tant teaching pro­fessor and director of the Doc­torate in Law and Policy pro­gram, exam­ines the court’s deci­sion and what it means for affir­ma­tive action.

3Qs: Is soda losing its fizz?

Philadel­phia recently became the first major U.S. city to pass a soft drink tax, and a new report from Bev­erage Mar­keting Corp. found that bot­tled water will soon sur­pass soda as the nation’s most pop­ular bev­erage. Here, Janice Maras, research man­ager in the Depart­ment of Health Sci­ences, who spe­cial­izes in dietary data analysis, explains how a soda tax might affect dietary habits and what kind of long-​​term impact the declining pop­u­larity of soft drinks will have on the nation’s obe­sity epidemic.

3Qs: Donald Trump’s acrimonious relationship with the press

Trump’s recent move to revoke the press cre­den­tials for The Wash­ington Post will back­fire on the pre­sump­tive Repub­lican pres­i­den­tial nom­inee, says Jonathan Kauf­mann, director of Northeastern’s School of Jour­nalism. “Ban­ning the Post from his ral­lies can only hurt Trump,” he explains. “Reporters are resourceful and they will get the news.”

3Qs: When hate and terror collide

Was the mas­sacre at a gay night­club in Orlando on Sunday morning a hate crime or an act of ter­rorism? Both, according to Gor­dana Rabren­ovic, director of Northeastern’s Brud­nick Center on Vio­lence and Con­flict, who char­ac­ter­ized the attack as a “mass shooting that sin­gled out a par­tic­ular group of people.”

3Qs: What’s the key to keeping the world safe?

I have never been as con­cerned with the world as I am today,” says North­eastern pro­fessor Denise Garcia, who is taking a group of stu­dents to the 11th Inter­na­tional Secu­rity Forum in Geneva this week. Here, she dis­cusses the con­fer­ence, the United States’ stock­pile of nuclear weapons, and the biggest secu­rity threats facing the world today.

3Qs: Why court ruling on emission reductions is ‘important and influential’

The Mass­a­chu­setts’ Supreme Judi­cial Court ruled recently, after hearing argu­ments from a North­eastern School of Law alumna, that the com­mon­wealth must specif­i­cally adhere to man­dates that call for sig­nif­i­cant emis­sion reduc­tions by 2020, a ruling that North­eastern envi­ron­mental law expert Lee Breck­endridge says is influ­en­tial and demon­strates the role courts can play in addressing cli­mate change.