3Qs: What’s the key to keeping the world safe?

I have never been as con­cerned with the world as I am today,” says North­eastern pro­fessor Denise Garcia, who is taking a group of stu­dents to the 11th Inter­na­tional Secu­rity Forum in Geneva this week. Here, she dis­cusses the con­fer­ence, the United States’ stock­pile of nuclear weapons, and the biggest secu­rity threats facing the world today.

3Qs: Why court ruling on emission reductions is ‘important and influential’

The Mass­a­chu­setts’ Supreme Judi­cial Court ruled recently, after hearing argu­ments from a North­eastern School of Law alumna, that the com­mon­wealth must specif­i­cally adhere to man­dates that call for sig­nif­i­cant emis­sion reduc­tions by 2020, a ruling that North­eastern envi­ron­mental law expert Lee Breck­endridge says is influ­en­tial and demon­strates the role courts can play in addressing cli­mate change.

3Qs: Experts contest claims of battery technology ‘breakthrough’

Recent research pub­lished in the pres­ti­gious journal Sci­ence described a break­through in lithium-​​battery tech­nology that could keep elec­tric cars going longer for less money. Northeastern’s K.M. Abraham, an expert on the topic, exam­ines the claims.

3Qs: What coral bleaching in the Great Barrier Reef means for the world

Marine sci­en­tists in Aus­tralia recently reported that 93 per­cent of the Great Bar­rier Reef is now bleached. Northeastern’s Steven Vollmer explains why the con­di­tion, typ­i­cally the result of warming ocean tem­per­a­tures, could lead to “the ocean’s equiv­a­lent of a rain­forest with no trees.”

3Qs: How to overcome the global drug problem

The United Nations Gen­eral Assembly recently con­vened a spe­cial ses­sion on drugs, marking its first meeting on the topic since 1998. We asked North­eastern drug policy expert Leo Beletsky, who spoke at one of the session’s side events, to reflect on the his­toric meeting and the future of drug policy reform.

3Qs: Is there a media bias in terrorist attack coverage?

In the past sev­eral months, ter­rorist attacks have rocked cities around the world. Many people have crit­i­cized the Western media’s cov­erage of the attacks as being uneven for con­cen­trating largely on the strikes in Euro­pean cities. We spoke with John Wihbey, assis­tant pro­fessor of jour­nalism and new media at North­eastern, about what he refers to as per­ceived “dif­fer­en­tial treat­ment” by main­stream news outlets.

3Qs: As Obama’s visit begins, what’s next for US and Cuba?

José Buscaglia, pro­fessor and chair of the Depart­ment of Lan­guages, Lit­er­a­tures, and Cul­tures, has just returned from Havana as part of a North­eastern del­e­ga­tion that explored sev­eral poten­tial aca­d­emic and research part­ner­ships in Cuba. Here, he exam­ines Pres­i­dent Obama’s trip there, which began Sunday, and how nor­mal­ized rela­tions may impact the two coun­tries going forward.

3Qs: How politicians are using your data to influence your vote

The cam­paign for Repub­lican pres­i­den­tial can­di­date Ted Cruz is working with a British data com­pany to develop behavior-​​based models of Amer­ican voters. As voters head to the polls today as part of Super Tuesday, we asked pro­fessor Nick Beauchamp if the prac­tice, called micro­tar­geting, is the quin­tes­sen­tial form of polit­ical per­sua­sion or simply a dirty trick played on the unwit­ting public.

3Qs: What’s next in the partisan fight to replace Scalia?

Pres­i­dent Obama intends to ful­fill his con­sti­tu­tional duty to nom­i­nate a new Supreme Court jus­tice to replace Antonin Scalia, but Senate Repub­li­cans have vowed to block his pick. We asked law pro­fessor Daniel Medwed how this polit­ical battle is likely to play out.