All articles posted in Society & Culture

3Qs: How ‘nomadic architecture’ will shape Rio’s Olympic legacy

Two venues at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro—the 12,000-seat Future Arena and the 15,000-seat Aquatic Stadium—will be dis­man­tled and rebuilt into entirely new build­ings fol­lowing the games. We asked assis­tant pro­fessor David Fannon, an archi­tect and building sci­en­tist, to explain how Rio’s reliance on “nomadic archi­tec­ture” might ben­efit Brazil in the decades to come.

3Qs: What is greatness—and how do you achieve it?

More than 11,000 ath­letes are com­peting at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, show­casing their supe­rior skill in nearly 40 dif­ferent sports. We asked Rachel Rodgers, asso­ciate pro­fessor in the Depart­ment of Applied Psy­chology, to define the con­cept of great­ness and explain how everyday people might tap into their own great­ness, regard­less of wealth, fame, or skill set.

3Qs: Why voting rights rulings will help the Democrats at the polls

Over the past two weeks, courts in five states have ruled against voter ID and proof-​​of-​​citizenship laws, citing their dis­crim­i­na­tory impact on minori­ties. Martha Davis, law pro­fessor and human rights expert, says that the court rul­ings will likely favor the Democ­rats, par­tic­u­larly in the swing states where restric­tive voter laws have been struck down.

3Qs: The ‘perfect storm’ that led to Brazil’s drastic and rapid decline

The state of Brazil in 2009, when Rio de Janeiro was awarded the Summer Olympics, stands in stark con­trast to the state of the nation today. As the world turns its focus to Rio for tonight’s Opening Cer­e­monies, asso­ciate pro­fessor Thomas Vicino explains Brazil’s change of fortune.

Russian athlete ban, not Rio prep, to be 2016 Olympics’ legacy

The 2016 Summer Olympics are finally here, opening this week in Rio de Janeiro amid a plethora of con­cerns, including the Zika virus, water con­t­a­m­i­na­tion, and civil unrest. Here, Olympics expert and asso­ciate teaching pro­fessor Philip D’Agati explains what we can expect and says of the city, “Their plan­ning hasn’t been that bad.”

3Qs: Social media and the success of viral campaigns

With news last week that money raised by the Ice Bucket Chal­lenge helped fund break­throughs in ALS research, we asked assis­tant pro­fessor of mar­keting Yakov Bart how social media has helped to ele­vate suc­cessful viral cam­paigns, and why Snapchat could be the future plat­form for those campaigns.

3Qs: US, Russia, and the 2016 presidential election

Russia this week played a leading role in the con­ver­sa­tion about the U.S. pres­i­den­tial race, from its alleged role in hacking Demo­c­ratic National Com­mittee emails to Donald Trump’s com­ments that he hoped the country had suc­cess­fully hacked Hillary Clinton’s email. We asked Ryan Maness, an expert in Russian for­eign policy and inter­na­tional cyber­con­flict and secu­rity, to examine what this could mean for the dynamic between the two nations.

3Qs: How to tame the Twitter haters

A score of Twitter users were banned by the social media ser­vice last week for hurling a spate of vile remarks at Ghost­busters star Leslie Jones. To find out how online anonymity affects the way people act toward each other and what social media sites like Twitter could do to curb tar­geted attacks, we turned to North­eastern assis­tant pro­fessor Joseph Reagle, an expert on internet trolling.

How Ailes’ fall could signal more changes at Fox News

Roger Ailes is out at Fox News. The media tycoon resigned on Thursday, just two weeks after former anchor Gretchen Carlson filed a law­suit alleging sexual harass­ment. Here, Dan Kennedy, asso­ciate pro­fessor and a nation­ally known media com­men­tator, talks about Ailes’ swift down­fall and pre­dicts that it “will stand as yet another mile­stone in the shift from tra­di­tional forms of media to digital.”